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Old 07-24-2010, 07:45 PM
 
3 posts, read 4,889 times
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So, I have planted some tomato seeds last month and after they germinated, I transplanted some from the growing pot which I started them in to a different garden box. The original ones that I left in the growing pot have doubled in size since and the transplanted ones in the garden box haven't grown much at all; no significant growth noticed. Is this some kind of growth shock from transplanting them?? Are they dying or do they just need time to reroot??
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Old 07-24-2010, 07:59 PM
 
Location: Little Rock AR USA
2,457 posts, read 6,295,036 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cvan83 View Post
So, I have planted some tomato seeds last month and after they germinated, I transplanted some from the growing pot which I started them in to a different garden box. The original ones that I left in the growing pot have doubled in size since and the transplanted ones in the garden box haven't grown much at all; no significant growth noticed. Is this some kind of growth shock from transplanting them?? Are they dying or do they just need time to reroot??
I suspect "shock" is the answer if everything else is equal. Did you plant them deep enough? I like to plant them at least up to the first leaf, and if they are tall enough I take it off and plant them up to the next ones.
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Old 07-24-2010, 10:01 PM
 
Location: Spokane via Sydney,Australia
6,611 posts, read 11,258,627 times
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I've seen SO many poor beginning to wilt/die off tomato plants (the ones left over at nurseries etc) lately.

I could probably save them but even at clearance "please take them" prices, realistically how many tomatoes do I need/can cope with? I wonder why they have so MANY plant starts left (of all kinds, especially annuals). Did they just not run the numbers right or does this happen every year? Seems like such a waste of resources.
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Old 07-25-2010, 02:47 PM
 
Location: Little Rock AR USA
2,457 posts, read 6,295,036 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Opyelie View Post
I've seen SO many poor beginning to wilt/die off tomato plants (the ones left over at nurseries etc) lately.

I could probably save them but even at clearance "please take them" prices, realistically how many tomatoes do I need/can cope with? I wonder why they have so MANY plant starts left (of all kinds, especially annuals). Did they just not run the numbers right or does this happen every year? Seems like such a waste of resources.
Happens every year. Starts are so cheap to produce they are not interested in "number crunching". That's another reason some of the stores which also have a "garden center" associated with it do not go to any effort to take care of the plants before they are sold.
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Old 07-28-2010, 05:45 PM
 
Location: Land of Free Johnson-Weld-2016
6,473 posts, read 13,872,943 times
Reputation: 6427
Quote:
Originally Posted by cvan83 View Post
So, I have planted some tomato seeds last month and after they germinated, I transplanted some from the growing pot which I started them in to a different garden box. The original ones that I left in the growing pot have doubled in size since and the transplanted ones in the garden box haven't grown much at all; no significant growth noticed. Is this some kind of growth shock from transplanting them?? Are they dying or do they just need time to reroot??
Hey, I'm new to vegetable gardening, too! My mom has a huge green thumb, and so do I...but mostly with houseplants. I planted my own vegetable gardening for the first time this year, and I'm learning a lot.

Actually it's kind of a struggle, personally I think perennials are more fun, but I can share my little tomato experience with you.

The roots of your transplants may have been damaged a little when you moved them. Give them water more regularly than the un-transplanted plants for a bit until they're established.

I do the same thing I do when I transplant anything else, I pick off a couple of leaves so the roots that were damaged in the transfer have less plant to support.

Apparently I planted the everything late-- I didn't plant my guys until June--but my transplanted Tommy-toes look pretty good and they have flowers now.

No fruit...lol just flowers.

Make sure the transplants have a lot of sun AND water. Apparently food plants, require massive amounts of resources. Also, I normally do not fertilize shrubs/trees, but food plants and esp plants in a pot probably need a little *fertilizer as well as organic material. That way they can grow a lot of fruit/leaves etc. before they croak.
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Old 07-29-2010, 11:08 PM
 
Location: NC, USA
7,088 posts, read 12,995,517 times
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I have been planting the same three varieties of tomato for the past ten years, always get good yields, great flavor. I grow tomatos mostly because I love tomato sandwiches. I grow Celebrity, Better Boy, and German Johnson. This year I planted a new one, well.......new to me anyway, a "Purple Cherokee" very large round purple-ish fruit that makes the best sandwich I have ever eaten. I will plant more of them next year. I could easily get three thick slice sandwiches from a single purple tomato.
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