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Old 08-05-2010, 06:33 PM
 
Location: Rockport Texas from El Paso
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Default Fruit Trees-recently planted pomegranate - -leaves wilting

I planted them last week - it was and is hot and sunny on the Texas Coast.
One has some dead dry leaves on parts of the branch has been bent down.

Others just have no new growth and the leaves aren' t the bright green color- they have been in the ground 1-2 weeks.

I'm not very good at this and my kids ask me why I keep trying lol
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Old 08-05-2010, 07:25 PM
 
Location: rain city
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Mid-summer sizzling heat is not a good time to be planting fruit trees.

They may not make it.

If they croak, plant new fruit trees early next spring so that by the heat of summer they've been able to establish a decent root system.
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Old 08-06-2010, 07:20 AM
 
Location: Rockport Texas from El Paso
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Of course the nurseries didn't say that to us. I can't afford to do this again-- I need these guys to live.
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Old 08-06-2010, 05:06 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
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As has been pointed out - this is the worst time of the year to plant anything in the south. If you want to give your trees a fighting chance - arrange the surface soil around the root ball like a big cup - that will hold water (build up the edges of the "cup" - with your hands). And then drench the roots by filling the cup perhaps every other day (or every day if your temps are in the mid to high 90's or 100's - unless you have clay type soils that hold a lot of water). Do not apply any fertilizer. Just try to keep those thirsty suckers alive until the temps are cooler.

BTW - did you plant the trees at the correct depth? The root ball level should be at the soil level - and optimally - a bit higher. Robyn

Last edited by Robyn55; 08-06-2010 at 05:25 PM..
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Old 08-06-2010, 05:14 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
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And I am assuming that what you bought *can* be grown in the part of Texas where you live (it's a big state with a lot of different climates). Where I live - the "big box" stores are notorious for selling stuff that won't do well here (our gardening climate here in NE Florida is tough - we have some hard freezes in the winter - but not a lot of chill hours - so we can't grow tropical or northern fruits - and the summer temps with average highs in the 90's aren't a lot of fun for most non-native trees either). Robyn

P.S. Plants/trees in the south generally put on new growth in the late winter/spring/early summer. And then "tread water" or get stressed out during the late summer - fall and early winter. Don't expect any new growth until next year - just try to keep them alive (however ratty they look).

Last edited by Robyn55; 08-06-2010 at 05:26 PM..
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Old 08-07-2010, 02:23 AM
 
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I suspect these trees were grown under a light shade. As such when you stuck them in the ground in full sun light they went into shock, probably sun scald. Try covering with a light colored shade material until it gets establish. Keep well hydrated.
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Old 08-07-2010, 01:34 PM
 
Location: Rockport Texas from El Paso
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Thanks Robyn and bulldogdad.

It already has a cup shaped circle around it and i can soak it good every other day.
I can sprinkle leaves during the day.


What I did was but a big box on a stake about 2 feet east of the plant. I then draped a blue tarp over it and it covers the sides of the tree. This should cut reduce sunlight from about 11 hrs a day full sun- to perhaps 5 hrs full sun and the rest semi shade.


Is this wise?
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Old 08-07-2010, 04:54 PM
 
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Yeah dont put water on the leaves it only acts to magnify the sun like a prizim.

Well I understand the shade structure you built. Its not what I would have done. I would just use a light weight shade cloth/fabric.
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Old 08-07-2010, 05:14 PM
 
Location: Ponte Vedra Beach FL
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I understand the shade thing you built too - and I'd be reluctant to do it. Believe it or not - plants/trees do things based on where the sun is in the sky during various seasons. So if you deprive the tree of the info it gets from the sky - it might get "confused" in terms of when it's supposed to do what.

The pomegranate is supposed to grow in full sun. But - if your specimen was raised under a little shade - I'd probably just use a general light shade screen from now until fall comes to your neck of the woods - then take the screen off and let it get used to where you planted it. Robyn
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Old 08-08-2010, 07:06 AM
 
Location: Rockport Texas from El Paso
2,452 posts, read 4,686,385 times
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What I ended up doing was putting a light blue tarp -thin material between two ladders so there is plenty of air to circulate underneath and parts still get pretty full sun. Its not too different from the picture bulldog put.

Do I water the bottom every other day or so? I may get a moisture meter today.
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