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Old 08-08-2010, 12:27 PM
 
46 posts, read 36,336 times
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I purchased a baby orange tree from Walmart in about a 3 gallon soil container late last year and it has not grown much at all. Maybe an inch. I purchased citrus fertilizer spikes to put in the ground and that has not helped much. (We do live in an area were orange trees grow naturally)

What are some things I can do to help this baby citrus tree grow?

Do orange trees require orange trees directly next to it to produce fruit?

Thank you
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Old 08-09-2010, 11:27 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rmd2010 View Post
I purchased a baby orange tree from Walmart in about a 3 gallon soil container late last year and it has not grown much at all. Maybe an inch. I purchased citrus fertilizer spikes to put in the ground and that has not helped much. (We do live in an area were orange trees grow naturally)

What are some things I can do to help this baby citrus tree grow?

Do orange trees require orange trees directly next to it to produce fruit?

Thank you

Ok, firstly, no it need not be next to another to produce fruit.

Now, what kind of soil are you using? Citrus needs very well-draining soil that stays moist but not soggy.

Lose the fertilizer spikes and get a proper fertilizer for citrus- I use something called Foliage Pro and it is pretty good
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Old 08-09-2010, 02:33 PM
 
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[quote=Moth;15398402]Ok, firstly, no it need not be next to another to produce fruit.

Now, what kind of soil are you using? Citrus needs very well-draining soil that stays moist but not soggy.

Lose the fertilizer spikes and get a proper fertilizer for citrus- I use something called Foliage Pro and it is pretty good[/quote

The soil is a combination of top soil mixed with a the local soil here. The soil is in an area were flowers have been planted years ago so maybe the soil does not have the nutrients it needs. Should I get some different soil? Other plants are growing well there. The area is near a hill so it drains well. We have just been watering the tree daily. It has been raining alot the last few days and the weather report says it will rain every day this week.

What do you think?
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Old 08-09-2010, 03:28 PM
 
11,287 posts, read 16,804,919 times
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[quote=rmd2010;15401231]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Moth View Post
Ok, firstly, no it need not be next to another to produce fruit.

Now, what kind of soil are you using? Citrus needs very well-draining soil that stays moist but not soggy.

Lose the fertilizer spikes and get a proper fertilizer for citrus- I use something called Foliage Pro and it is pretty good[/quote

The soil is a combination of top soil mixed with a the local soil here. The soil is in an area were flowers have been planted years ago so maybe the soil does not have the nutrients it needs. Should I get some different soil? Other plants are growing well there. The area is near a hill so it drains well. We have just been watering the tree daily. It has been raining alot the last few days and the weather report says it will rain every day this week.

What do you think?
I use a mix of 5 parts pine bark chips, 1 part peat moss, and 1 part perlite. This drains the soil very well and brings in air. Then you only water when it about to be dry. This summer I water about 2x per week. I mix the Foliage Pro in the water. And like you, I am conscious of rainfall.

Use small pine bark chips- you can get them at HD for a song. Many people use coconut husk chips but I do not know where to get them. You can also use Repti bark- bark for pet reptiles- available at any pet store.

To test and see if the soil has dried out, use a wooden dowel. Insert into the soil to the bottom. Then hold it up against your skin. If you feel any moisture, leave it alone.

Citrus is tricky. I am far from an expert.

There are other variations of this, but that is the basic medium mix.
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Old 08-11-2010, 05:13 PM
 
Location: State of Jefferson coast
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A citrus tree that has been in the ground less than a year is not yet established. It needs to develop a network of root hairs that interface with the soil before it will put on new top growth. This takes time.
In my experience, citrus trees tend to decline quite quickly if conditions are not to their liking. If yours looks good, but has just stalled, I would just be patient. Apply NO FERTILIZER until a tree shows signs of active growth. Fertilizer does not stimulate inactive trees into growing and can easily cause root damage.
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Old 08-13-2010, 09:47 AM
 
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My tips were for container grown citrus. I agree with Brenda on the in ground.
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Old 09-25-2010, 11:37 PM
 
Location: Carrboro and Concord, NC
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Good advice thus far. Very good drainage, LOTS of sunlight, and don't overdo the fertilizer.

I keep citrus in pots - too cold in North Carolina for them to overwinter outdoors. I have grafted and seedling - calamondin, yuzu, sudachi, tangelo, pummelo, eureka lemon, and key lime. The grafted trees did exactly the same thing when I got them - the calamondin grew none for several months, before waking up (slightly) while indoors for the winter, and going into a massive growth flush in March; it has since doubled in size. The yuzu has been more episodic, but still steady in its' growth, and it too has grown quite a bit. They do like soil that tends towards the acidic.

Thus I'd suggest that you keep a close eye on them, especially watching out for pests or signals of decline, like chlorosis. That noted I wouldn't be TOO concerned - as my experience suggests that citrus take a few months to acclimate to changes of scenery.
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