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Old 10-16-2010, 07:13 AM
 
Location: N of citrus, S of decent corn
28,098 posts, read 35,072,454 times
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We have never had it before. Is it going to turn tan this winter, no matter what we do?
We have a nice thick green lawn which we do not irrigate. It has held up great through the hot summer. I notice that some of the neighbor's grass is starting to get a little brown, despite the fact that most of them have sprinklers. We are about to give it a dose of fall fertilizer. Is this all we need to do, or should we put some water on it, or doesn't it matter?
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Old 10-16-2010, 10:45 AM
 
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You are in the Pooler area, right?

Centipede can stay green all year around. BUT... a frost will brown the leaves. I really don't think you want to fertilize it now. Wait until Spring. A few days of HOT, DRY weather, like we had a short while ago, will cause it to brown a little.

It does need to be watered during dought conditions. We have been lucky this year as the amount of rain seems to have been enough. It's possible to overwater. I have no idea why your neighbor's grass is starting to brown.
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Old 10-16-2010, 07:15 PM
 
Location: N of citrus, S of decent corn
28,098 posts, read 35,072,454 times
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Ok, I don't mind saving some money and waiting until spring to fertilize. I just want to take good care of it, but don't know anything about centipede.
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Old 10-16-2010, 09:34 PM
 
Location: Floribama
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Centipede goes dormant and turns brown during the winter (as does St Augustine). I agree with waiting until spring to fertilize. Mine has been growing fine for 40 years with hardly any fertilizer at all. Centipede can be bad about thatch build up, so it doesn't hurt to de-thatch it every few years.

You can overseed it with annual rye grass, but you'll be mowing it often all winter long.
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Old 10-17-2010, 08:29 AM
 
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It seems that we have a difference of opinion about whether or not centipede goes dormant in the winter. All I can say is, it depends. It depends on the amount on cold nights that we have. In the last few years, we have been lucky and the grass has managed to hold it's color. Being near the Atlantic does raise the temps a couple of degrees. That seems to be enough. If the winter is warm, and we have a lot of rain, you may find that the grass does grow a bit. You may even want to mow.
We run our mulching mower over it to get the leaves and that takes care of the tiny bit of growth that the grass has.

It used to be that it was a common practice to overseed the lawn with rye grass. This led to a peculiar looking neighborhood where one lawn was bright green and all the rest were not. I think it has sort of fallen out of favor in this area. It seems like a lot of trouble for just a couple of months. The first hard frost that is enough to turn the entire lawn, may not come until January or February. Of course, it goes without saying, that THIS year may be entirely different. I would not bet money on anything the weather does lately.

Watch your neighbors. They may have centipede, St Augustine or a mixture of both. I have both. Some years, the St. A. takes over and other years, the centipede takes it's turn. We just mow and don't worry about it. Mother Nature has her quirks. Last winter was the first in several years where the grass turned brown all over. It comes back quickly when spring started. St. Augustine can take more heat and less water than centipede. You may find that the centipede in full sun all day wilts after several very hot hours. It comes back the next day.

Unless your ground happens to be very worn out, it might not need fertilizer. Be careful. Both grasses seem to be able to outgrow a healthy root system.

Good luck!!
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Old 10-17-2010, 08:36 AM
 
7,101 posts, read 22,070,863 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Padgett2 View Post
Unless your ground happens to be very worn out, it might not need fertilizer. Be careful. Both grasses seem to be able to outgrow a healthy root system.

Good luck!!
What ever you do.....don't use a fertilizer that is heavy on nitrogen. The grass will grow like crazy, but the roots won't be strong enough to support it through the hot summer.

I think the accepted height to set the mower is about 2 1/2 inches for centipede, and 3 1/2 inches for St. Augustine. This will be enough shade to protect the roots and shade out weeds.
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Old 10-25-2010, 02:38 PM
 
Location: Aiken, South Carolina, US of A
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Centipede grass likes poor soil.
It's the only grass that I can grow nicely with little care.
You have to fertilize centipede with a grass fertilizer SPECIFICALLY for
centipede grass. In spring, once.
That's it.
I water mine once a week real good, we have been in a drought situation.
Centipede NATURALLY never goes dormant at all. In China, where it is from.
As soon as you get a frost, it will turn brown.
It is the last grass to turn brown though.
I love centipede grass, mow your centipede at 1 1/2 inches by the way.
Unless you want it to seed, in that case, 2- 2 1/2 inches.
You are fortunate to have centipede grass, it is strong as steel.
Remember, you have to buy products SPECIfically made for centipede.
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Old 03-18-2017, 12:08 PM
 
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My centipede lawn was greening up nice the last few weeks. We had a mild frost one or two nights now it is brown. Will this comeback? I haven't fertilized the lawn as of yet. Thanks for any input. I am a Maine transplant here to Ga. so I am not familar with centipede grasses or with seeing a lawn before May!
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Old 03-19-2017, 07:45 AM
 
Location: N of citrus, S of decent corn
28,098 posts, read 35,072,454 times
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Oh my, it is 6 years later now, and I've gotten used to caring for centipede. Douggrowe, the grass turns brown, just like the autumn leaves up north. Pretty soon the switch will flip, and it will turn green again. No fear about the late frost we had a few days ago. Around here, the men are tuning up the mowers. You'll be mowing in a few weeks.

Right now, our dilemma is getting some new seed to germinate on some bare spots. Hubby want to reseed, but I think it just needs warmer temps.
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