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Old 06-23-2012, 07:14 AM
 
Location: Prospect, KY
5,288 posts, read 17,482,726 times
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They definitely can be overwatered and they should not be sopping but they should never dry out even on top - they need to be evenly moist and as has been stated, keep the leaves dry. They do like humidity so growing them near the kitchen sink or bathrooms (where generally the humidity is higher) and where there is sufficient indirect natural light works very well.

No one has mentioned fertilizing - African Violets need regular fertilizing - 15-30-15. They should be fed several times a month with a 1/2 strength dose of fertilizer. Growers feed them with every watering. If your leaves are beautifully healthy and you have no flowers, it is probably because you aren't fertilizing them.

The other thing: The wild violets that some of you have growing in your yard are acclimated to being outside and are not the same variety of violets as the hot-house grown African violets that you buy at the grocery store or plant center. African violets are grown in green-houses under ideal growing conditions: Lots of indirect light, constant even moisture, usually fertilizer with every watering, correct humidity - so we are talking about 2 different plants that thrive under different growing conditions.

Last edited by Cattknap; 06-23-2012 at 08:20 AM..
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Old 06-26-2012, 07:50 PM
 
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I've heard don't get water on the leaves from many people...thing is how do they ever survive in the wild when it rains?

Several people told me they do better if they get extremely pot bound. So my last pair of violets I avoided transplanting them to a new fancy AV 2-piece pot after purchasing and just left them in their extremely crowded plastic pot. Then did well for months till last week I killed one.
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Old 06-27-2012, 04:45 PM
 
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I received an Acrican Violet as present 3 yrs ago and kept it on the same pot by the East-facing window. It continues to give vivid-violet/ blue flowers. I was thinking about transplanting it to a bigger pot. I never fertilize it, and was wondering if I should. I will give it some 13-13-13 as I have plenty of those, and will see how it grows.
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Old 06-27-2012, 06:43 PM
 
Location: Prospect, KY
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HB2HSV View Post
I received an Acrican Violet as present 3 yrs ago and kept it on the same pot by the East-facing window. It continues to give vivid-violet/ blue flowers. I was thinking about transplanting it to a bigger pot. I never fertilize it, and was wondering if I should. I will give it some 13-13-13 as I have plenty of those, and will see how it grows.
It needs 15 30 15.
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Old 06-27-2012, 07:22 PM
 
Location: Kenmore, WA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by crabbylion View Post
These plants have been a little tough to manage and I'm trying to narrow down the one thing I'm doing to prevent growing success. Would too much light hurt the African Violets as much as too little light? How much water is considered ideal. Do they fair well indoors (under flourescent lighting) on a desk? I really like this species and I'm determined to conquer them. Thanks.
Mine was delivered to me from my DH, in '98. I try to keep it out of direct sunlight, but it has had its sunny days when we were in the RV -- sitting on the dashboard when we were parked. I didn't do that intentionally, but there were times when we'd leave it in the shade, and not return until it was in full sun. Now it sits on a bookcase in our sun room, out of the direct light -- but still gets lots of light.

My aunt used to hang hers in her living room windows and they grew long. I think they were a different kind.

I change out the soil about once every three or four years -- using the african violet soil from the grocery store. For awhile, it kept putting out "babies" so I put it in one of those oblong pots, but I split them off and gave them to others and put it back into its little (4") clay pot. I have it sitting on a much larger clay tray filled with gravel -- from our side yard. When the leaves start to droop, I water it until the tray fills.
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Old 07-01-2012, 02:31 AM
 
Location: Moku Nui, Hawaii
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Actually, the African violets growing in my yard are the exact same variety as grown in greenhouses. I got them from Lyndon Lyon and whenever they don't do well in the house (i.e. they've stopped blooming) I put them outside until they bloom again and then bring them in. I treat them just like orchids and they do fine.

This works for me, but this might not work in your yard. In the back yard here the lowest recorded temperature was 55 degrees Fahrenheit and the hottest recorded temperature is 91 degrees Fahrenheit. Humidity is almost always above seventy percent. The African violets are in a shaded spot under the tree ferns and they thrive there. They get rained on and it's almost always somewhat damp under the tree ferns. Our average annual rainfall is 129 inches (or ten feet, nine inches) of rain each year. They don't really get fertilized much other than a bit of bunny manure or bunny manure tea since that's the only fertilizer I have. So, if you have trouble with your African violets, just move to Hawaii and keep them in your yard.

There are three different basic types of African violet that I know of. The "standard" which we are all familiar with, then a "miniature" version as well as a "trailing" version. The flowers come in a few different types as well as the leaves can be of several different types, too. They really are sweet little plants.
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Old 07-02-2012, 05:44 PM
 
Location: Prospect, KY
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African violets are indigenous to Africa but not Hawaii. If you have African violets in your yard, it is because someone other than mother nature planted them there. You probably have very good growing conditions where you live and many things thrive. We have wild violets - really they are a weed more than anything - they will take over your lawn - much smaller plant than African violets.
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Old 07-03-2012, 08:47 AM
 
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Default 4 things to remember with african violet

There are four major things to be very careful if you want to succeed with African violet.

Watering:
Watering | Cor2000.com

light:
Light | Cor2000.com

Temperature:
Temperature | Cor2000.com

Fertilization:
Fertilization | Cor2000.com

The good news, all four of them are easy to achieve in the house environment.
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Old 10-23-2012, 08:31 PM
 
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The conditions in the wild are different from the artificial indoor condition of your house. The African violets in the wild are plants from the lower strata. They are not exposed to direct sunlight. The water can damage the cells of the leaf by amplifying the light coming from a direct source. It is not the water itself but the heat produced from the light amplification that affects the sensitive cells of the plant. Sometimes, the water of our city contains numerous chemicals as chlorine. These chemicals can also damage the cells of the leaves.

See: Watering | Cor2000.com
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Old 10-23-2012, 08:44 PM
 
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A beautiful Saintpaulia is a plant with a round crown of leaves and well stocked flowers . To achieve this, we need to recreate the original conditions of his ancestors who lived in the African forest. In technical terms, to flower, the Saintpaulia needs from 5000 to 13,000 lux for about 12 hours. One lux is an abbreviation for Lumens per square meter. An old plant needs between 10 000 and 15 000 lux to be comfortable. A young plant needs less light is from 5 000 to 8000 lux. If a plant has less than 5000 lux, it will stay in the vegetative stage.


Light | Cor2000.com
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