U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 01-14-2015, 03:55 PM
 
Location: Old Hippie Heaven
16,143 posts, read 7,089,742 times
Reputation: 9150

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by katary View Post
hey just wondering is there an ideal temperature range for the worms??? i mean will they freeze at a certain point? what can they tolerate??
tyvm
Depends on the kind of worms you are talking about. Your local earthworms can obviously deal with what your weather can dish out.

Most vermicomposting uses red worms, because they can tolerate the warmish conditions of decomposition. They are most active from around 65F up to around 95F. If you keep them in an outside bin, as I do, they need to be insulated from freezing. They will slow down when its colder, and, depending on your conditions, may survive the winter only as egg cases, not adults.

Absolutely anything you might want to know can be found here (with a little digging - it's not the most organized site you'll ever encounter) -
Red Worm Composting

Edited to add - and here are people with outdoor worm bins in a cold climate -
http://www.sierrawormsolutions.com/outdoorbin.html
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-15-2015, 10:06 AM
 
Location: Bowie but New Orleans born and bred
667 posts, read 713,568 times
Reputation: 475
From what I read, for vermicomposting, between 50-80 degrees F is preferable
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-15-2015, 10:13 AM
 
Location: Dallas
5,457 posts, read 4,575,985 times
Reputation: 15588
Quote:
Originally Posted by katary View Post
hey just wondering is there an ideal temperature range for the worms??? i mean will they freeze at a certain point? what can they tolerate??
tyvm
My neighbor tried wormiculture. He gave up because they couldn't tolerate the heat in his barn (TX) and kept dying off. I've heard some people keep them under the kitchen sink so temperature fluctuations aren't an issue.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-15-2015, 03:47 PM
 
19 posts, read 18,138 times
Reputation: 52
thanks for the info i just recently started composting & have been watching videos on youtube in regards to the red worms and im this close I--I to starting a worm bin but i'd never seen anything as to the temps i do belive it will be my weekend project thanks again for the info & link.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-15-2015, 08:33 PM
 
25,631 posts, read 29,103,055 times
Reputation: 23049
Miss MOgals posts and threads.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-16-2015, 06:49 AM
 
3,513 posts, read 4,355,224 times
Reputation: 4586
Quote:
Originally Posted by WhoDatInMD View Post
From what I read, for vermicomposting, between 50-80 degrees F is preferable
This is what I have seen. My worms curl up in a ball when it gets cold.

I bought large plastic tubs with lids and drilled holes along the top for air circulation. Then shredded paper and wet it for bedding, placed the worms in there, and then covered the bedding and worms with food scraps. Only vegetation and, sometimes, eggshells. Use only newsprint or paper without colored ink for the bedding. Add water from time to time to keep the bedding just moist.

I am really bad about keeping up on it and would probably would get a lot more worm castings if I tended to it better.

Only use red wigglers. Earthworms don't fulfill the same purpose but are great in the garden.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-26-2015, 01:46 PM
 
3,513 posts, read 4,355,224 times
Reputation: 4586
I'm bumping this old thread because I have a couple of questions.

I started vermicomposting last fall and I don't think I am doing it right.

I did get one good size clump of castings from one of my bins. For the most part, though, I neglected the bins and most of the castings I did get are interspersed with the bedding material and vegetation.

Do you wait until it is 100%, or nearly so, to harvest the castings? I was concerned because I read somewhere that worm castings a toxic to the worms that didn't produce it. So I am not sure at what point to harvest.

Can you use grass as bedding?

When I was working in my yard, I came across some worms that looked like they could be red wigglers and I threw them in my bin. If they are not red wigglers, will it hurt the current population?

ETA: I just check on my bins and two of them are seriously full of other bugs. Earwigs for one but lots of others too.

Last edited by Everdeen; 05-26-2015 at 01:57 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-26-2015, 02:22 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
16,702 posts, read 20,456,636 times
Reputation: 30698
This facebook group is great. You just have to click on the button to ask to join and they'll add you. In case the link isn't allowed, the group is "Vermicomposting - Worm Farming Facebook Group."

https://www.facebook.com/groups/wormfarm/

I had great luck growing worms inside my apartment. The problem I ran into, is that it's impossible, in my opinion, to separate worms from their castings. I was growing red wigglers.

If I had an outside garden where I didn't care if I added worm eggs (in cocoons), then I'd definitely grow worms. They are amazing at composting. And it's fun to grow them.

But, if you intend to put castings in pots or containers, it's a bad idea, unless you first go ahead and sterilize the soil, to kill the eggs.

Plus, no matter how you try, you will end up with mites and other critters in your soil. Again, if you have them outside and you intend to just add the castings to an outside garden, it would be fine. Or you can just sterilize the castings, to kill the critters.

Honestly, there are cheaper and cleaner ways to add compost and fertilizer to your garden. I enjoyed learning about worms, but I wouldn't bother with them again, unless I had an outside compost pile I could just throw some into.

But, if you want to learn, that facebook group is full of nice people. Keep in mind that many of them want to sell you things, so they'll try and tell you it can be done cleanly and easily lol. The honest ones will admit they don't worry about some worms ending up in their final product.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-26-2015, 02:46 PM
 
3,513 posts, read 4,355,224 times
Reputation: 4586
Quote:
Originally Posted by NoMoreSnowForMe View Post
This facebook group is great. You just have to click on the button to ask to join and they'll add you. In case the link isn't allowed, the group is "Vermicomposting - Worm Farming Facebook Group."

https://www.facebook.com/groups/wormfarm/

I had great luck growing worms inside my apartment. The problem I ran into, is that it's impossible, in my opinion, to separate worms from their castings. I was growing red wigglers.

If I had an outside garden where I didn't care if I added worm eggs (in cocoons), then I'd definitely grow worms. They are amazing at composting. And it's fun to grow them.

But, if you intend to put castings in pots or containers, it's a bad idea, unless you first go ahead and sterilize the soil, to kill the eggs.

Plus, no matter how you try, you will end up with mites and other critters in your soil. Again, if you have them outside and you intend to just add the castings to an outside garden, it would be fine. Or you can just sterilize the castings, to kill the critters.

Honestly, there are cheaper and cleaner ways to add compost and fertilizer to your garden. I enjoyed learning about worms, but I wouldn't bother with them again, unless I had an outside compost pile I could just throw some into.

But, if you want to learn, that facebook group is full of nice people. Keep in mind that many of them want to sell you things, so they'll try and tell you it can be done cleanly and easily lol. The honest ones will admit they don't worry about some worms ending up in their final product.
Well, that's good to know. I have some organic pesticide, but I'll try sterilizing it for sure. I bet if I just laid out the casings on a tarp, most of the critters would scatter away.

I can't imagine a cheaper way to to compost. At least to get the quality that worm castings provide.

Thanks.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-26-2015, 03:06 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
16,702 posts, read 20,456,636 times
Reputation: 30698
I think most of the mites, etc., are beneficial insects, but in a bin the population can explode. Outside, in a compost pile, perhaps things would balance themselves out better.

If you just feed them a worm food, or just use a dry grain, for instance, you can control what ends up in the bin. But, if you are adding cardboard and veggie peelings, etc., there can be all kinds of critters and critter eggs on them, that you just can't control.

I think the best way to do it, is in an outside open compost pile. The worms will have freedom of movement to go towards or away from heat. And they will always be drawn to the food, so I don't think you'd have to worry about them wandering off. If I ever did it again, that's how I'd do it. And I'd get some of the bigger worms, too, that can also be used for fishing.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top