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Old 04-05-2011, 03:01 PM
 
Location: West Texas
2,441 posts, read 5,246,318 times
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... are light green while across my street as well as up the street they have the same tree but their leaves are darker green.

One tree is older, one is a little younger.

I don't want to end up over-watering if that's not the problem... nor over fertilizing, nor anything else until I know what I might be so I can treat it accordingly.
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Old 04-06-2011, 05:09 AM
 
Location: Newport, NC
956 posts, read 3,487,548 times
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Not sure about your area, but in PA. the off colored leaves are caused by iron being bound up by the soil and not available to the tree. Mostly affects oaks. Do you know if topsoil was imported for the trees that are green? Are these new trees or trees that have been in the ground awhile?
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Old 04-06-2011, 09:48 AM
 
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I'm in TX and we have 6 medium to large sized Bradford pears lining our driveway and we don't do a darn thing to them...water, fertilize, nothing. They do get water from the sprinkler system but we don't run it often, at least we don't until the blazing, searing TX heat settles in. Bradfords from my understanding are supposed to be low maintanence and don't need alot of water (unless they newly planted) and can adapt to pretty much any kind of soils so I guess I wouldn't over water or over fertilize them.
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Old 04-10-2011, 08:16 AM
 
Location: West Texas
2,441 posts, read 5,246,318 times
Reputation: 3094
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rtom45 View Post
Not sure about your area, but in PA. the off colored leaves are caused by iron being bound up by the soil and not available to the tree. Mostly affects oaks. Do you know if topsoil was imported for the trees that are green? Are these new trees or trees that have been in the ground awhile?
I'm in west Texas (read: desert), but there are tons of Bradford Blooming non-fruit bearing pear trees. And they are all hearty (as the poster between our posts noted).

I'm just curious for the type of soil in the area our houses are (red clay) why the variance in tree leaf color. I wouldn't be so worried if I saw one or two others with light leaves too, but it's just mine. When I planted my tree, I dug twice the area recommended and used tree/shrub soil since I knew the red clay and caliche are hard for trees to establish in.

Oh well.. thanks for the reply!
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