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Old 05-07-2011, 03:39 PM
 
2,516 posts, read 990,545 times
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Great thread, PITTS. I am curious what the white flower is... It reminds me of Passion Vine. Your Hibiscus flowers are gorgeous and I love your sense of whimsy in the garden.

***I wasn't able to copy the pics for some reason. The flower in question is from the first page. Do you know the name of each of your hibiscus?
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Old 05-08-2011, 03:40 AM
 
Location: Sarasota, Florida
15,292 posts, read 11,528,963 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shadowne View Post
Great thread, PITTS. I am curious what the white flower is... It reminds me of Passion Vine. Your Hibiscus flowers are gorgeous and I love your sense of whimsy in the garden.

***I wasn't able to copy the pics for some reason. The flower in question is from the first page. Do you know the name of each of your hibiscus?
THANKYOU shadowne......thet's a Night Blooming Cerus Cactus plant....I'll post another pic of it....the plant is "ugly" like cigars and very scraggly but the blooms are spectacular....nearly the size of a dinner plate.

I like eclectic whimsy in the garden for a nonformal and more "natural feel".

No I forget the names not long after I plant them....some of the Hibiscus are nearly 10 years old.

Here's some pics of the Cereus Cactus>>>>>

Cereus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Nightblooming cereus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The type we have are thin and climbing up a telephone pole and Palm Tree.









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Old 05-10-2011, 08:43 PM
 
Location: Sarasota, Florida
15,292 posts, read 11,528,963 times
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Old 05-11-2011, 12:03 PM
 
Location: Charlotte, NC dreaming of other places
939 posts, read 1,147,923 times
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Nice pics everyone, thanks for sharing. My garden still in the works, will post when I have something growing.
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Old 05-12-2011, 03:39 PM
 
Location: Sarasota, Florida
15,292 posts, read 11,528,963 times
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Originally Posted by happehart View Post
Nice pics everyone, thanks for sharing. My garden still in the works, will post when I have something growing.
Looking forward to your pictures>>>>>









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Old 05-16-2011, 05:11 AM
 
Location: Sarasota, Florida
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Old 05-20-2011, 11:50 PM
 
Location: Sarasota, Florida
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Old 05-21-2011, 06:04 PM
 
Location: Funky Town
15,920 posts, read 4,613,154 times
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Hey Pitts & gardening friends. Here's a few pics of my little garden spot. It's the only area around my house that the deer can't munch on, so I'm playing around with annuals & succulents in addition to my established perennials. Sorry I'm not the best photographer.



My new rooter plant.


My little porch.


An old wash drum with succulents.


My money tree! $$$

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Old 05-22-2011, 10:02 AM
 
Location: Carrboro and Concord, NC
965 posts, read 1,133,081 times
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">

^
Strawberry Guava, about 1 year old. In my part of the world, these are winter-indoors, container plants. Given their invasiveness in warm-winter places, the indoor-outdoor thing might actually be ideal.


">

^
Lemon - recovering from some windburn and sunbrun from taking it out too early this spring. This guy is now about 2.5 feet tall, 2 years and 1 month old, seeds from a supermarket lemon. Tis done magnificently - they are a little tougher than I was expecting. Rub the leaves and then smell your fingertips, and the smell is the greatest thing in the world.

">

^
Sterile (no fruit) wild muscadine of some sort growing at the end of my backyard.

">

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Apple guava, or common guava, or green guava. Indoor winter, outside the rest of the time. These are really gorgeous, tough (=almost weedy) little trees. This one's about a year old. apart from frost sensitivity, they can take anything you can dish out - in a year, this guy has been through drought, rainy spells, 100-degree heat, they don't care!

">

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Sudachi citrus. Rare in cultivation outside of a handful of spots in southern Japan. They are slower-growing, smaller (dwarfish), shrubbier, longer-lived in spite of their small stature, and a bit more frost hardy (20s, not 30s) than other citrus - VERY close relatives of kaffir limes, yuzu, kabosu, and other papeda-type citrus. The fruit is small - clementine-sized, and grows in tight bunches like grapes or grapefruit. Incredibly sour (seed for this plant came from fresh fruit), even by citrus standards, nearly inedible - the juice and zest are treated more like a spice in Japanese cuisine, though I understand that heavily sweetened you can make a dynamite marmalade with them, and un-sweetened, the fruit also figures into some wicked Japanese salsa-type concoctions. As a potted, seed grown plant, it will be years - if ever - if this ever blooms and sets fruit. The UC Riverside citrus research station in southern CA apparently has shrubby little sudachi that are decades old and still set tons of fruit, so once they start to bear, they just go and go and go. The leaves smell/taste a lot like kaffir lime leaves, for spice/culinary uses.

">

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Ice cream beans, a.k.a. pacay. A rare legume - bean relative from Ecuador & Peru. So far content in a large pot. Distant kin to other tree legumes: honey mesquite, palo verde, honey locust, tamarind, carob. Like all of those, it produces and edible fruit (pod fruit, like all legumes), lined with this vanilla-flavored wooly pulp. Mine haven't set any fruit yet, though the seed came from fresh fruit, so we shall see. Beautiful plants either way, and FAST growers.
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Old 05-23-2011, 04:52 AM
 
Location: Sarasota, Florida
15,292 posts, read 11,528,963 times
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Great pictures everyone; THANKYOU so much for sharing your gardens>>>>>









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