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Old 06-12-2011, 02:55 PM
 
Location: Between Heaven And Hell.
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With the weather being cold for at least half of the year, and the need for fresh salad crops, Iíve often played with the idea of growing vegetables indoors. Not that I have a room spare at the moment, but the economics would seem to add up. From the information that I have found, it doesnít take too much electricity for lighting, and the wasted electricity from inefficiency of the lighting could prove to be a positive thing, being that it ends up as heat. There would also be a negligible risk from pests or disease, I would assume.

I know that having a load of florescent lighting could raise suspicion from certain authorities, but it looks like an interesting project.

Anyone ever tried this, if so, how well did the resultant veg or fruit come out?
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Old 06-13-2011, 03:10 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BECLAZONE View Post
I know that having a load of florescent lighting could raise suspicion from certain authorities, but it looks like an interesting project.

Anyone ever tried this, if so, how well did the resultant veg or fruit come out?
One of the things the cops are interested in is the smell coming out of your house. Unless your rutabagas smell like pot I wouldn't worry too much.

Years ago hydroponic gardening for indoor vegetable growing was semi-popular. You might look into that.
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Old 06-13-2011, 04:20 PM
 
Location: Between Heaven And Hell.
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Originally Posted by DewDropInn View Post
One of the things the cops are interested in is the smell coming out of your house. Unless your rutabagas smell like pot I wouldn't worry too much.

Years ago hydroponic gardening for indoor vegetable growing was semi-popular. You might look into that.
You just brought back a load of memories. Years ago I had a glasshouse full of plants grown the hydroponic method, that was back in the 80s, it seemed to go out of fashion. I do think veg tastes better grown in soil, though I may look into that again, it could be fun.
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Old 06-13-2011, 04:46 PM
 
Location: not where you are
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I've got a few things growing indoors, mainly herbs. But then I live in Fl. very sunny window. If I ever find where I threw my camera this morning I'll snap a pic and post it.

In the mean time, there are hundreds of videos of people doing indoor veg/plant growing how to's on youtube.

Just a sampling of what you'll find there


YouTube - ‪Grow a tomato plant indoors‬‏


YouTube - ‪Grow a tomato plant indoors in winter‬‏


YouTube - ‪Indoor Container Garden 8‬‏


YouTube - ‪SNL - Christopher Walken: Indoor Gardening Tips From A Man Who's Very Scared Of Plants‬‏
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Old 06-13-2011, 05:30 PM
 
1,014 posts, read 2,402,581 times
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Originally Posted by BECLAZONE View Post
With the weather being cold for at least half of the year, and the need for fresh salad crops, Iíve often played with the idea of growing vegetables indoors. Not that I have a room spare at the moment, but the economics would seem to add up. From the information that I have found, it doesnít take too much electricity for lighting, and the wasted electricity from inefficiency of the lighting could prove to be a positive thing, being that it ends up as heat. There would also be a negligible risk from pests or disease, I would assume.

I know that having a load of florescent lighting could raise suspicion from certain authorities, but it looks like an interesting project.

Anyone ever tried this, if so, how well did the resultant veg or fruit come out?
I would be interested in hearing others experiences with this as well. I don't have a yard but have my deck/patio filled with container plants of tomatoes, peppers and herbs. I took clippings from many of my plants and have transferred them to pots indoors. My hope is by the time my outdoor crop has fizzled I will have a new crop indoors. At least that is the plan.
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Old 06-16-2011, 04:11 AM
 
Location: Between Heaven And Hell.
11,076 posts, read 7,183,777 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TRosa View Post
I've got a few things growing indoors, mainly herbs. But then I live in Fl. very sunny window. If I ever find where I threw my camera this morning I'll snap a pic and post it.

In the mean time, there are hundreds of videos of people doing indoor veg/plant growing how to's on youtube.

Just a sampling of what you'll find there


YouTube - ‪Grow a tomato plant indoors‬‏


YouTube - ‪Grow a tomato plant indoors in winter‬‏


YouTube - ‪Indoor Container Garden 8‬‏


YouTube - ‪SNL - Christopher Walken: Indoor Gardening Tips From A Man Who's Very Scared Of Plants‬‏
Thank you.

Thank God for broadband. Just looking at those videos gives quite an insight into the pitfalls of growing veg indoors. The first two are very informative. The third one needs to use better lighting and to change his potting compost.

Christopher Walken is just on another planet.
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Old 06-16-2011, 04:21 AM
 
Location: Between Heaven And Hell.
11,076 posts, read 7,183,777 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by neecewh View Post
I would be interested in hearing others experiences with this as well. I don't have a yard but have my deck/patio filled with container plants of tomatoes, peppers and herbs. I took clippings from many of my plants and have transferred them to pots indoors. My hope is by the time my outdoor crop has fizzled I will have a new crop indoors. At least that is the plan.
This was also my plan originally.

I think there may be problems with the lifespan of your Tomato plants taken from cuttings, it depends on whether the varieties you have are determinate or indeterminate though.
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Old 06-16-2011, 08:05 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BECLAZONE View Post
This was also my plan originally.

I think there may be problems with the lifespan of your Tomato plants taken from cuttings, it depends on whether the varieties you have are determinate or indeterminate though.
BECLAZONE, I have both. I do have a patio tomato variety as well as rutgers, marion heirloom, and sweet 100. I thought the sweet 100s might have the greatest chance of success, but this is my first time trying. I need any and all tips I can get.
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Old 06-16-2011, 01:28 PM
 
Location: Between Heaven And Hell.
11,076 posts, read 7,183,777 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by neecewh View Post
BECLAZONE, I have both. I do have a patio tomato variety as well as rutgers, marion heirloom, and sweet 100. I thought the sweet 100s might have the greatest chance of success, but this is my first time trying. I need any and all tips I can get.
I hadn’t heard of those varieties, (I am in the UK, and we have different names for some varieties), but after looking them up, sweet 100 looks like a good contender, but Marion heirloom could also be worth considering.

If you start a new batch from seed though, whether they are determinate or indeterminate is of no consequence, it is just worth considering how tall the plants are expected to grow, and if you have room for them.

I said that was my plan originally, because I’ve come to the conclusion that it may be better to start a new lot of plants off late in the season. (We have a lot of disease over here, and it’s not worth the risk of setting up all the equipment, and then losing all the plants to disease. If they are indoors from the start, there is very little chance of that happening).

May I ask, have you thought about the lighting that will be needed?

Last edited by BECLAZONE; 06-16-2011 at 01:37 PM..
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Old 06-16-2011, 05:45 PM
 
1,014 posts, read 2,402,581 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BECLAZONE View Post
May I ask, have you thought about the lighting that will be needed?
I have a couple spots in my house that have very good natural light but I have been looking into florescent lighting. I haven't invested in the lighting yet, but I am sure it won't be long before I will have to do so. I think my herbs will be fine without additional help, but from what I have read the tomatoes will need some assistance. Right now my tomatoes outside are only getting about 6 hours, at the most, of sunlight because they are in pots on my deck (which has a solid fence along one side). They are thriving, I picked my first tomato mid May. That being said, it isn't 85 degrees in my house so I am sure extra lighting will help.
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