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Old 08-16-2007, 01:56 PM
 
1,408 posts, read 7,255,790 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by southward bound View Post
We have a huge hydrangea next to the garage. It gets good morning sun and some afternoon sun. The rest of the time it's shaded. We moved in late last year and thought perhaps we missed the blooming time and thought we'd see it this year, but it didn't happen. I fed it a few times this year, hoping to encourage it. Maybe I didn't water as often as it needs? It looks very healthy.

It lost some growth during the early spring freeze we had in NC this year, and I cut those branches back. It has filled out beautifully, though.

What does it need to make it bloom?

We had a beautiful bush where we used to live (up north) and I never had to fuss with it much at all. It bloomed every year.
i have a blue blooming hydrangea myself. one year i cut it back (forget when) and the following 3 seasons i didn't get a single flower (this is the first season it bloomed). someone told they're somewhat sensitive to change and will stop blooming for a few seasons while it "heals" itself. also as for cutting i was told (by the same person) to only cut the dead stems after the plant has bloomed so you know for sure which ones are dead.
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Old 08-17-2007, 12:53 PM
 
Location: Out there somewhere...
38,677 posts, read 45,030,920 times
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Good advice from Torrie and lpdsag.
Many plants when frozen or trimmed will not bloom until the following season when it gets new growth.
Yes use acid type fertilizers, ie; MirAcid or Super Bloom. Not only will you get colorful flowers, but larger ones and more abundant flowering if you feed them regularly by following the directions on the fertilizer package.
When fertilizing make sure you water thoroughly as to not burn the upper root system.
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Old 08-23-2007, 11:02 AM
 
2,177 posts, read 4,998,513 times
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ok, thought this would be appropriate here as it is a hydrangea thread. I am less than skilled(ok a complete dolt) in the art of gardening, I moved to SC this year and the heat overwhelmed my hydrangea(it was already planted, I did not transplant it), and I did not water it enough. it is a pink one I think(thats what it says on the tag?) anyway, my question is other than what i'm already doing, keeping the soil wet, fertilizing every 7 days, trimming the really dead branches, is there anything more I can do, it is already starting to bounce back, but I don't want to kill it by doing anything stupid? i'm using miracle grow liquifeed, and it seems to be working great, any ideas?
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Old 08-23-2007, 11:29 AM
 
Location: City of the damned, Wash
428 posts, read 2,217,442 times
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Although I can't seem to get the bloom color that I want, I'm pretty good at keeping the foliage happy. When it hits 90+ degrees, the foliage will wilt, so I mist the plant and put a full bin of ice at the base.
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Old 09-10-2007, 04:25 AM
 
Location: NJ
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Some hydrangia don't bloom IMO because they probably don't like the spot they are planted in. A friend gave me one (Lacecap) that always had sun, I planted it in morning sun, never bloomed again.

I had a few bushes from my old house that never bloomed. These were over 15 years old, so I'm not sure if they bloom on old or new but by last year I dug them because they'd maybe give me one bloom.

I can grow roses but not hydrangia.
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Old 09-15-2007, 09:49 PM
 
Location: University Place, WA
420 posts, read 1,128,710 times
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Pruning Hydrangea depends on the type of Hydrangea you have. Here is a link that tells the different types and whether they flower on old wood or new wood:Pruning Hydrangea - Renovators Place (http://www.renovatorsplace.com/dsp_articles.cfm?l_article_id=307&l_cat_id=155&cat id=41 - broken link)

I prune mine down almost to the ground in March and the foliage comes in lush and full of blue blooms. Also, when I was redoing my backyard about 7 years ago, I tried to get rid of it--didn't work, that Hydrangea bush grew back hardier than ever.

I'm beginning to think that if you want a healthy, full, blooming Hydrangea all you need to do is act like you are trying to get rid of it---hack it back, dig at the roots, and curse at it; it will grow with a vengeance.
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Old 06-09-2008, 10:01 AM
 
Location: a nation with hope
13,155 posts, read 16,873,712 times
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Ok. We have abundant blossoms, ready to pop! The tiny buds have a blue tinge to them, but when they open, they are very nearly white. Unless one looks closely, one would call it white. It just beginning to bloom.

Is it too late to apply acid to turn the color to true blue?

We're in a new home and the bush froze last year, so it didn't bloom at all and I had no idea what to expect of it. I just left it alone, fed it in the spring, and here we are. It will be pretty just as a white hydrangea, but I do so love the blue ones!
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Old 06-09-2008, 04:59 PM
 
Location: a primitive state
9,537 posts, read 19,405,892 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by southward bound View Post

Is it too late to apply acid to turn the color to true blue?
I don't know. Get some Miracid (the acidifying Miracle Grow product) and give it a try. Then let us know.
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Old 06-09-2008, 05:36 PM
 
Location: Finally escaped from Philly ;-}
1,182 posts, read 1,302,449 times
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Default organic fertilizer?

My hydrangeas didn't seem to like the sun. So I transplanted them to the shadier side of the house & they filled out. But still no flowers. I read somewhere to feed them stale coffee grounds & tea leaves. Now they get huge flowers all summer long. They are a dark bluish-rose color.
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Old 06-09-2008, 05:48 PM
 
Location: Out there somewhere...
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Coffee grounds acidify the soil, that's what they like. MirAcid does the same.
Too much shade and you'll get poor or no blooms. They need about 6 hours of sun, especially the first 6 hours of the day.
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