U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-17-2011, 12:36 PM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
69,278 posts, read 79,447,244 times
Reputation: 38636

Advertisements

OK, so our local store had nice sized pots on sale today for 1/2 price and I bought 5, should have bought more. Anyway, I am putting them aside til next year when I will try cukes and something else in containers. These pots do not have holes in the bottom. Should I make sure there are bottom holes or leave they the way they are and other than cukes and tomatoes what else works well in pots? I don't want to do tomatoes, I grow too many of them. Of course I know about herbs, but I have smaller pots and am growning them fine this year (in the front yard I will add) : We live in a pretty rural area so only 6 neighbors have reported us for growing a garden in the front yard.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-17-2011, 01:11 PM
 
Location: San Francisco Bay Area
1,482 posts, read 4,647,133 times
Reputation: 774
I'd put holes in the bottom. I put onions (chives) in pots.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-21-2011, 09:33 PM
 
Location: Kronenwetter, Wis
444 posts, read 972,652 times
Reputation: 260
I have a friend that plants certain veggies in containers (pots). He cuts the bottoms right out and buries the pot about 3/4 in the ground. His plants are really doing great. Saves on water too.
I'm going to try this next year, mostly for tomatoes.

I tried pole beans last year in pots in window boxes. Disaster. I think pots were too small. They definitely did not like those pots.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-21-2011, 09:58 PM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
17,393 posts, read 3,537,755 times
Reputation: 22599
You can grow a lot in pots...the pot **size is key. And very rich & loamy soil. And definitely holes in the pots....otherwise they will not succeed. And heavy feeding, as the soil gets leached of plant nutrients quickly in summer with frequent watering.

I have seen: potatoes (in lg bags), small cukes, bush beans-lg pots (not pole), small peppers, small carrots ie Nante, leaf lettuce (does well as roots are shallow), radishes....green onions. Also snow peas...

These of course would not work: squash/zucchini, pumpkins or anything that takes an incredible amt of space.

Google vegetable container gardening!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-21-2011, 09:59 PM
 
Location: oregon
893 posts, read 2,459,154 times
Reputation: 649
I grow tomatos in pots, strawberries in window boxes,..When doing pots of any kind..Get the best potting soil you can, read the label for stuff like worm casing and other good stuff..
Better Homes and Gardens has a neat book out about grown anything and everything in pots, window boxes and more..See if your library has copy..
Good luck
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-22-2011, 07:32 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
69,278 posts, read 79,447,244 times
Reputation: 38636
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamh View Post
I grow tomatos in pots, strawberries in window boxes,..When doing pots of any kind..Get the best potting soil you can, read the label for stuff like worm casing and other good stuff..
Better Homes and Gardens has a neat book out about grown anything and everything in pots, window boxes and more..See if your library has copy..
Good luck
thanks, I think I will get the book for next spring. Right now I am only planning on growing cukes and peppers in pots. I decided, as mentioned the squash needs too much room and I plant way too many tomatoes to try pots. I would need about 20 pots. We do have a lot of friends that plant them in pots and have fair success, but not as good as planting them directly in the ground.

Nita
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-22-2011, 02:43 PM
 
Location: Out there somewhere...
38,677 posts, read 45,030,920 times
Reputation: 106703
Yes pots can restrict their growth patterns. No holes in pots = root rot, no drainage with too wet of soil at the bottom, plus no oxygen can permeate correctly through the soil.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-25-2011, 11:57 AM
 
17,749 posts, read 15,026,257 times
Reputation: 6377
Quote:
Originally Posted by nmnita View Post
thanks, I think I will get the book for next spring. Right now I am only planning on growing cukes and peppers in pots. I decided, as mentioned the squash needs too much room and I plant way too many tomatoes to try pots. I would need about 20 pots. We do have a lot of friends that plant them in pots and have fair success, but not as good as planting them directly in the ground.

Nita
Hi Nita,

It looks like you are in a warmer zone. In ground will probably get the best yield in zone 6-7. However in northern zones, containers win every time. I know since I do both. I can start containers earlier since they are easily kept in some sort of barrier or green house. Even in late May, the ground can still be cold while container plants go on full throttle. Then I can extend the season and move some of them in a shelter to catch some Indian summer. Most other people I see have tomatoes in ground are the same as my in ground and I am always weeks ahead. Raised beds tend to do better than in the ground. I never get split tomatoes with heavy rain either which is a huge threat here in the ground.

It also tends to be about soil volume per plant. As long as you have between 1/2 a square foot to 2 square feet you will tend to get the best yields by soil volume. Containers usually have soil volume limitations. More then that will get you more per plant, but will tend to be less efficient by soil volume. Determinate plants will somewhat self limit of course.

Though I will say peppers seem to be the ideal large container plant. They never seem cramped, and the ones I overwinter are pepper making machines. Bell peppers are just about futile for anyone here in the ground. I was happy to get 5 peppers per plant. Now I look to get 50.

All this is in 5 gal with about a gal self watering reservoir. If I were in zone 7, I would do no less than 10 gal for water reasons alone, plus potential plant sizes. In my zone 5, I would recommend at least 10 gal for squash.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-25-2011, 12:13 PM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
69,278 posts, read 79,447,244 times
Reputation: 38636
Quote:
Originally Posted by gwynedd1 View Post
Hi Nita,

It looks like you are in a warmer zone. In ground will probably get the best yield in zone 6-7. However in northern zones, containers win every time. I know since I do both. I can start containers earlier since they are easily kept in some sort of barrier or green house. Even in late May, the ground can still be cold while container plants go on full throttle. Then I can extend the season and move some of them in a shelter to catch some Indian summer. Most other people I see have tomatoes in ground are the same as my in ground and I am always weeks ahead. Raised beds tend to do better than in the ground. I never get split tomatoes with heavy rain either which is a huge threat here in the ground.

It also tends to be about soil volume per plant. As long as you have between 1/2 a square foot to 2 square feet you will tend to get the best yields by soil volume. Containers usually have soil volume limitations. More then that will get you more per plant, but will tend to be less efficient by soil volume. Determinate plants will somewhat self limit of course.

Though I will say peppers seem to be the ideal large container plant. They never seem cramped, and the ones I overwinter are pepper making machines. Bell peppers are just about futile for anyone here in the ground. I was happy to get 5 peppers per plant. Now I look to get 50.

All this is in 5 gal with about a gal self watering reservoir. If I were in zone 7, I would do no less than 10 gal for water reasons alone, plus potential plant sizes. In my zone 5, I would recommend at least 10 gal for squash.
thanks, I have no idea how big my pots are, but they are certainly not small. Now, you have me wondering so I will need to find out before next spring.

Nita
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-25-2011, 01:46 PM
 
17,749 posts, read 15,026,257 times
Reputation: 6377
Quote:
Originally Posted by nmnita View Post
thanks, I have no idea how big my pots are, but they are certainly not small. Now, you have me wondering so I will need to find out before next spring.

Nita
Hi Nita,

It still may be worth while for earlier tomatoes. In my area, just as a plant would become monstrously huge, my growing season is more than half over. So I'd rather it just start producing by July. I used to butt heads with a guy in another forum in a southern zone until I figured out we were just in two different worlds. He thought 5 gal was crazy small.

This pink Brandywine has become a monstrous plant and is currently hosting some huge tomatoes. Easy rotation is another plus. Also notice its bottom watered which also helps against blight. Though I also give credit to homemade compost top dressing. Usually the black cherries get the biggest.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top