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Old 09-20-2007, 09:25 AM
 
Location: USA East Coast
4,445 posts, read 8,281,355 times
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Just thought I would post a few photos of my small tropical garden in coastal Connecticut near Long Island Sound. Im in zone 7 along the southeast Connecticut coast. In my travels throughout the Mid-Atlantic States I have seen some palms, bamboo, and bananas growing a few times. I have seen several taller windmill palms growing in coastal New Jersey and Delaware, and hardy bananas in sheltered areas in Maryland (Ocean City) and Long Island, NY. I always wanted to try it.

As everyone knows, the climate of East Asia (Japan, East-central China, South Korea) is pretty similar in climate to the Atlantic states from North Carolina to Connecticut. Long hot, humid summers with high rainfall, and moderate winters with below freezing temperatures, but not sub-zero cold like the Mid-West or Upstate New York/ New England.

The bamboo of course is the most hardy, and will even grow in zone 5 but may never get large due to winter die-off and clums breaking from heavy snow loads. I have seen bamboo in Michigan, Massachusetts, and northern Ohio, but it never gets large (on average) because of the heavy snow in northern areas away form the coast. The Bananas and palms, of course, seem more fragile. I think zone 7/6b is the limit for growing a palm, so I hope mine will survive. The Bananas seem to overwinter fine as long as I mulch them after I cut them down after the first hard frost around early November.

Just thought I would show what is possible in Zone 7 without too much trouble. My yard looks more like it's deep South China than the United States (LOL).
Attached Thumbnails
windmill palm tree-musa.jpg   windmill palm tree-musa07.jpg   windmill palm tree-musa07b.jpg   windmill palm tree-bamboo.jpg   windmill palm tree-year-2-sept20-c.jpg  

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Old 09-26-2007, 09:40 AM
 
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Nice. I have succesfully grown windmill palms and banana trees as well down here in DC.

What do you do with your banana trees when Winter comes? Hack them down and mulsch the stump? Bring them inside?
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Old 09-27-2007, 11:16 AM
 
Location: USA East Coast
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Moth View Post
Nice. I have succesfully grown windmill palms and banana trees as well down here in DC.

What do you do with your banana trees when Winter comes? Hack them down and mulsch the stump? Bring them inside?
MOTH,

I used to cover them, but it got to be too much work. Now around mid November - after the first hard frost, I just hack them off to about 6 inches tall, and cover them with leaves and a small tarp. They regrow in April no problem. I think as long as the ground stays unfrozen, there fine.
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Old 09-28-2007, 04:25 AM
 
Location: Tolland County- Northeastern CT
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Looks great Wave

my windmills have done very well this summer- the heat in September I am sure they have loved. Over the summer The Trachy Wag has put out 5 new leaves, and the fortunei 6 new leaves.

These palms look great in the garden, and the neighbors sure stare in disbelief.
I am hoping for a moderate winter.
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Old 09-28-2007, 04:54 AM
 
Location: USA East Coast
4,445 posts, read 8,281,355 times
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Sky -

I finaly was able to get 30 sec free to take some pictures. I saw your pic of your Windmill a few posts back (something about a MA windmill I think). Yours looks great! I can't believe how tall it is.

About 5 new fronds have emerged this year so far - another is coming up with this heat we have been having. I've tried to trim off a few of the lower fronds.... so it starts to look more like a tree.

I think we will be fine this winter. NOAA is saying average temps until late December, then a little above normal till late March. You know the drill here, temps only really get super cold (below 10 F) a few nights a year... for a few hours till the sun comes up.
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Old 09-28-2007, 07:26 AM
 
11,287 posts, read 16,811,646 times
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Quote:
I used to cover them, but it got to be too much work. Now around mid November - after the first hard frost, I just hack them off to about 6 inches tall, and cover them with leaves and a small tarp. They regrow in April no problem. I think as long as the ground stays unfrozen, there fine.
My uncle in California does the same. Thanks for the tip.
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Old 10-06-2007, 05:37 AM
 
Location: Tolland County- Northeastern CT
4,459 posts, read 6,093,600 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wavehunter007 View Post
Sky -

I finaly was able to get 30 sec free to take some pictures. I saw your pic of your Windmill a few posts back (something about a MA windmill I think). Yours looks great! I can't believe how tall it is.

About 5 new fronds have emerged this year so far - another is coming up with this heat we have been having. I've tried to trim off a few of the lower fronds.... so it starts to look more like a tree.

I think we will be fine this winter. NOAA is saying average temps until late December, then a little above normal till late March. You know the drill here, temps only really get super cold (below 10 F) a few nights a year... for a few hours till the sun comes up.
Wave if this weather keeps up- my palms will not slow their growth until Christmas! I mean its been near 90!

Yes the NOAA predicts a warm autumn and mild winter as well.
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Old 03-12-2008, 08:24 AM
 
Location: New Bedford, MA
8 posts, read 53,589 times
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Hello
I just joined. I live in New Bedford, MA and I also grow the musa's. I planted one nearly 3 years ago and the stalk is about 7 feet tall, and approx 12 feet for the height of the leaves! I chop the leaves off in November, wrap the stalk with household insulation, and cover it with a tarp.
I also have 1 windmill palm that I planted in May 07 and it did ok during the summer, not much growth at all. I left it pretty much unprotected all winter and it actually grew a new leaf/branch! On very cold nights I put a garbage can over it. I believe the coldest we got here during the winter at night was about 7 or 8 degrees, but never that cold during the day (maybe a low of 25 during the day for the winter.) It only got that cold 2 times I believe.
I am looking forward to watching what happens this spring/summer.
New Bedford, MA is zone 7, but pretty close to the edge of zone 6.
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Old 03-12-2008, 05:07 PM
 
Location: IN
20,170 posts, read 34,488,778 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gregrc75 View Post
Hello
I just joined. I live in New Bedford, MA and I also grow the musa's. I planted one nearly 3 years ago and the stalk is about 7 feet tall, and approx 12 feet for the height of the leaves! I chop the leaves off in November, wrap the stalk with household insulation, and cover it with a tarp.
I also have 1 windmill palm that I planted in May 07 and it did ok during the summer, not much growth at all. I left it pretty much unprotected all winter and it actually grew a new leaf/branch! On very cold nights I put a garbage can over it. I believe the coldest we got here during the winter at night was about 7 or 8 degrees, but never that cold during the day (maybe a low of 25 during the day for the winter.) It only got that cold 2 times I believe.
I am looking forward to watching what happens this spring/summer.
New Bedford, MA is zone 7, but pretty close to the edge of zone 6.
Yes your climate is quite tropical compared with areas just to your north. I believe central NH is in zone 4 or 5.
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Old 03-14-2008, 10:46 AM
 
Location: New Bedford, MA
8 posts, read 53,589 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Plains10 View Post
Yes your climate is quite tropical compared with areas just to your north. I believe central NH is in zone 4 or 5.
Tropical, I wish! I just got back from Key West and talk about beautiful gardens.
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