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Old 10-19-2011, 07:07 PM
 
1,785 posts, read 2,921,016 times
Reputation: 3061

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Debsi View Post
Thanks for the advice!! I've seen vinca, that's a good idea.
Deb, the true experts on here could advise you better on this, but I was very fortunate to meet a woman on C-D within my own state forum (NY). I had mentioned I was going to Loews but she was pruning out her own beautiful garden and offered me cuttings of the following:

--the creeping scented geranium (mostly air roots, so it's easy to plant)
--hostas "royal standard" (they actually like sun!)
--foxglove
--a columbine

didn't have time for the tall phlox yet and can't get to the gooseneck loosestrife yet - too early.

I can't tell you how beautiful our flower beds looked this year. Elke's planting took to our soil beautifully and even with the brutally hot summer we had (and again - my lack of a green thumb) they really thrived.
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Old 10-19-2011, 08:33 PM
 
Location: Western Washington
8,004 posts, read 9,653,945 times
Reputation: 19408
Quote:
Originally Posted by cokatie View Post
Deb, the true experts on here could advise you better on this, but I was very fortunate to meet a woman on C-D within my own state forum (NY). I had mentioned I was going to Loews but she was pruning out her own beautiful garden and offered me cuttings of the following:

--the creeping scented geranium (mostly air roots, so it's easy to plant)
--hostas "royal standard" (they actually like sun!)
--foxglove
--a columbine

didn't have time for the tall phlox yet and can't get to the gooseneck loosestrife yet - too early.

I can't tell you how beautiful our flower beds looked this year. Elke's planting took to our soil beautifully and even with the brutally hot summer we had (and again - my lack of a green thumb) they really thrived.
Cokatie, you bring up a really good point. In fact, I'd even go so far as to visit with a few of your neighbors, you know...people who have yards that you admire. I can not count the number of times I have dug up plants from my yard for others. Gardeners with very prolific, healthy gardens, generally have plants which need to be divided and/or thin.

We LOVE our plants and they're like our pets. LOL Most gardeners would much rather thin their plants and find them a good home, than put them in the compost heap. In fact, I go so far as to haul a stack of gallon pots around with me, laying on top of a wheelbarrow of soil. As I'm doing my gardening, I dig up and pot up those plants that need to be thinned or divided. I than haul my treasure to one of many shady areas and water them. I always have many extras. Perhaps you can find such a gardener nearby....even better, offer to buy them. They'll likely sell them much cheaper than you could buy them in a store!
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Old 10-19-2011, 09:09 PM
 
Location: Land of Free Johnson-Weld-2016
6,474 posts, read 13,406,838 times
Reputation: 6404
Quote:
Originally Posted by Debsi View Post
Argh.. what can I grow in that spot that won't need a ton of care and won't ruin my life like the morning glory? I started with completely empty flower beds all around the house 4 years ago, with the exception of 3 beautiful hibiscus that are taller than I am. Novice gardener. I still have a ways to go to fill things in, but get an improvement in coverage percentage every year. I'm not too into annuals anymore and I'd like to get to where I have a lot of self-seeding & things that can survive the brutal hot summer without watering every single day. For instance, I got two different kinds of "free" flowers this year from annuals I bought last year. They just popped up! It was awesome.
Indian paint brush and some purple spiky flower I don't know the name of.

Other things that seem to love our soil/weather: rosemary, thyme, lantana,and I have a oleander bush.

I've also done well with knock-out roses in pots but not so much in the ground.

I don't get why local nurseries sell all kinds of plants that aren't well suited to our climate!! I think a lot of people must be willing/able to just pay gardeners to change all their plants every season.
Grr right?
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Old 10-20-2011, 08:10 AM
 
Location: Brooklyn New York
15,228 posts, read 23,749,578 times
Reputation: 19847
I love morning glories, be it wild ones or store seeded ones....they are so pretty......one of my favorites.....but I have a friend that keeps yanking them out.....I cry !!!
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Old 10-20-2011, 11:46 AM
 
Location: Land of Free Johnson-Weld-2016
6,474 posts, read 13,406,838 times
Reputation: 6404
Quote:
Originally Posted by nightcrawler View Post
I love morning glories, be it wild ones or store seeded ones....they are so pretty......one of my favorites.....but I have a friend that keeps yanking them out.....I cry !!!
One of my property is infested with some pretty pink flowers I thought were Morning Glory, but I found out in this forum it is actually an evil invasive plant called "hedge bindweed." True to name it strangled a lot its neighbors and is keeping native plants from getting a toehold on the slope.

But I'm in zone 7, and I love regular morning glories. Hee hee I have blue and pink. They're pretty climbing up a trellis or the side of the house. I did since learn my lesson and bought a native honeysuckle for the trellis...but I'm still going to grow the MG.
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Old 03-20-2012, 03:07 PM
 
Location: Tampa bay
1,014 posts, read 1,249,884 times
Reputation: 1369
I think they are beautiful flowers. I had to take it out because it was strangling my flowers next to it.
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Old 03-21-2012, 02:14 PM
 
2,401 posts, read 3,805,737 times
Reputation: 2169
Ohhh... good that I read this...

I have a pack too & basically just started 5 plants.
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Old 03-21-2012, 08:56 PM
 
Location: For Pig Latin Ess-Pray Ee-Thray
2,182 posts, read 5,303,749 times
Reputation: 3909
Quote:
Originally Posted by kinkytoes View Post
One of my property is infested with some pretty pink flowers I thought were Morning Glory, but I found out in this forum it is actually an evil invasive plant called "hedge bindweed." True to name it strangled a lot its neighbors and is keeping native plants from getting a toehold on the slope.

But I'm in zone 7, and I love regular morning glories. Hee hee I have blue and pink. They're pretty climbing up a trellis or the side of the house. I did since learn my lesson and bought a native honeysuckle for the trellis...but I'm still going to grow the MG.
BTDT. I had a major Bindweed invasion myself. I think I have it under control now. (Knock on wood) .

I tried everything. Finally I found something that worked.
Fill a water/pop bottle etc with about 1" concentrated Roundup. Just enuf so that when you turn it on its side the Roundup doesnt run out. Very carefully unwind the Binweed from your posies and gently stuff the vine into the bottle making sure its emersed in the Roundup. Be patient leave the bottles there for a while. You want to make sure you get all the roots. The hard part is not yanking it out and jumping on it.

I had a jillion bottles laying in my flower beds for awhile. So far so good. But the house next to me is vacant. I can see them over there in the weeds plotting and scheming.
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Old 01-24-2015, 01:52 PM
 
4 posts, read 3,401 times
Reputation: 15
Default Moringi Glorys in my raspberries, Help!

I have a row of nice mature raspberries that produce enough berries every year to keep us in jam and delicious deserts for the summer and into the fall. A couple of years ago, my neighbor's morning glory problem moved in. They are all through the roots of my berries. They climb up the stalks and literally strangle them! I have tried pulling them up, that's a lesson in frustration! I always pull the flower heads off or the seed pods when I see them, but nothing has helped. I am to the point where I am considering just taking cuttings from the berries, then pulling them up and treating the soil with something to kill off the morning glory. I can move the row of berries. But this also means that it will be several years before the berries produce much of a crop. If I use round up, it will kill the berries too, won't it? Does anyone have any suggestions? Or is it best to just throw in the towel on this spot?
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Old 01-24-2015, 01:58 PM
 
4 posts, read 3,401 times
Reputation: 15
Default Morning Glorys in my raspberries, Help!

I have a row of nice mature raspberries that produce enough berries every year to keep us in jam and delicious deserts for the summer and into the fall. A couple of years ago, my neighbor's morning glory problem moved in. They are all through the roots of my berries. They climb up the stalks and literally strangle them! I have tried pulling them up, that's a lesson in frustration! I always pull the flower heads off or the seed pods when I see them, but nothing has helped. I am to the point where I am considering just taking cuttings from the berries, then pulling them up and treating the soil with something to kill off the morning glory. I can move the row of berries. But this also means that it will be several years before the berries produce much of a crop. If I use round up, it will kill the berries too, won't it? Does anyone have any suggestions? Or is it best to just throw in the towel on this spot?
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