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Old 10-23-2011, 05:14 PM
 
Location: N of citrus, S of decent corn
30,588 posts, read 38,192,122 times
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Everywhere I live, Mass., Ohio, Georgia, I see pretty hydrangea shrubs, yet I never have much growing them. Why?
At my parent's house in Massachusetts... beautiful deep purple hydrangeas.
In NE Ohio, on the north side of my house. NO
Here in GA I have shade and I want to plant some. but I fear failure.
It is a case of, I don't want to let it beat me.

Last edited by gentlearts; 10-23-2011 at 06:10 PM..
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Old 10-23-2011, 06:24 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in Texas
5,137 posts, read 10,808,355 times
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I had the most beautiful and huge hydrangea shrub when I lived in Sun Valley, California. It was there when I purchased the home and I didn't kill it. I just love them, but I don't know the secret. I tried to grow one in Texas once, but that didn't work. It's way too hot here, at least I guess that was why.
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Old 10-23-2011, 08:17 PM
 
Location: Former LI'er Now a Rehoboth Beach Bunny
6,574 posts, read 8,252,560 times
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Try this website Planting, Transplanting, and Fertilizing Hydrangeas, I passed it along to my sister and she now has beautiful hydrangeas growing on her property. I got it from a friend when I had the same complaint that you did. I didn't know they were suited to different exposures and climates depending upon type.
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Old 10-23-2011, 08:49 PM
 
Location: Reston
560 posts, read 999,991 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
Everywhere I live, Mass., Ohio, Georgia, I see pretty hydrangea shrubs, yet I never have much growing them. Why?
At my parent's house in Massachusetts... beautiful deep purple hydrangeas.
In NE Ohio, on the north side of my house. NO
Here in GA I have shade and I want to plant some. but I fear failure.
It is a case of, I don't want to let it beat me.

Oakleaf hydrangea is a nice native choice for partial shade-

Hydrangea quercifolia
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Old 10-23-2011, 11:01 PM
Status: "Super Junior's 12th Anniversary!" (set 9 days ago)
 
Location: Land of Free Johnson-Weld-2016
6,421 posts, read 12,549,277 times
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I agree Oakleaf hydrangea may be a great choice if the climate is right. It does like a little dryer soil and may be able to withstand more sun/heat than traditional macrophyllas/annabelles etc Buuut...while looking for bulbs on Burpee's website, I saw a NEW hydrangea.

Maybe you'll have luck with the White King hydrangea. I haven't had the chance to try it, but according to the website it can withstand more sun and dryness AND is disease resistant. Too good to be true?...well it looks like it only comes in white LOL so that may be a minus for some people.

http://www.burpee.com/perennials/hyd...rod002490.html It is currently on sale, but if anyone tries it, I am curious to know how it performs.
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Old 03-16-2017, 11:14 AM
 
1,539 posts, read 435,054 times
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An important consideration in regards to hydrangeas...


Some grow on new wood, and some grow on old wood. So, question to the OP...do you get beautiful green foliage, and the plant looks quite healthy, but no flowers? If that's the case, don't trim your bushes after July. You're cutting off the flower buds, which are forming in July/August.


Is your bush looking sickly and puny in general? Hydrangeas require a lot of water when the weather gets hot, and they have a hard time with too much direct sun. A PERFECT location for them would be a place that gets dappled sun. Also, they like a nice rich soil, so if you haven't already, I'd put some aged manure around your bushes now, in the Spring time.
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Old 03-16-2017, 12:09 PM
 
Location: N of citrus, S of decent corn
30,588 posts, read 38,192,122 times
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I do not prune it at all, because it never gets more than 2' high. I get blooms, but what I don't understand is why folks in the frozen north get hydrangea bushes that grow big and full, and here in a mild climate they struggle.

I think my plant is starting to leaf out a little, and perhaps I could water it more than I do. I do fertilize with food for acid loving plants, but I'll try some manure too.
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Old 03-16-2017, 04:47 PM
 
Location: rain city
2,935 posts, read 10,538,699 times
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^^^

They grow like weeds around here with absolutely no care whatsoever. Do nothing, have fabulous hydrangeas.

So probably soil/sunlight/moisture have a large part to play.

I have noticed that they will not stand to be dried out, that makes them miserable for some time and slow to recover - be sure they have consistently moist soil.

They like shade, even deep shade. Here in Rain City where the sun only comes out 2 months a year, they will thrive and flower on the north side of buildings.

I always like them better unpruned they just get huge, I leave them alone except for deadheading.

Maybe you're giving them too much attention?
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Old 03-16-2017, 05:09 PM
 
Location: N of citrus, S of decent corn
30,588 posts, read 38,192,122 times
Reputation: 49055
Quote:
Originally Posted by azoria View Post
^^^

They grow like weeds around here with absolutely no care whatsoever. Do nothing, have fabulous hydrangeas.

So probably soil/sunlight/moisture have a large part to play.

I have noticed that they will not stand to be dried out, that makes them miserable for some time and slow to recover - be sure they have consistently moist soil.

They like shade, even deep shade. Here in Rain City where the sun only comes out 2 months a year, they will thrive and flower on the north side of buildings.

I always like them better unpruned they just get huge, I leave them alone except for deadheading.

Maybe you're giving them too much attention?
YES! I think they hate heat and abundant sunshine. This doesn't explain my previous failures, but it explains my current one.
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Old 03-16-2017, 06:32 PM
 
Location: Floribama
11,928 posts, read 26,987,762 times
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Here in the South, they tend to like growing underneath tall pines, where they can get filtered sunlight. If they're planted next to the house, the east side is best so they can get morning sun and afternoon shade. Use lots of mulch to retain moisture, and water during dry spells.
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