U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 10-24-2011, 12:13 PM
 
Location: Murphy, NC
2,938 posts, read 5,222,887 times
Reputation: 1181

Advertisements

I'm asking what I can grow that needs little sunshine because I'm looking to move around the mountains. Are potatos hard to grow? I'd like to have squash, tomatos, rice, beans, greenbeans and probably fruit. This will be in the southern appalachain mountains. This area has plenty of rainfall and will be at the bottom of the mountains. Do you think I may need to have a special bed with its own soil?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-24-2011, 12:40 PM
 
Location: southwestern PA... where the nest is now empty!
12,158 posts, read 14,380,093 times
Reputation: 18675
You need to know your zone....
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-24-2011, 12:48 PM
 
Location: Murphy, NC
2,938 posts, read 5,222,887 times
Reputation: 1181
It looks like I'll be in the humid-subtropical zone which covers Delaware to east Texas.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-24-2011, 08:44 PM
 
122 posts, read 132,855 times
Reputation: 79
we are in the foot hill of the Appalachian area, we grow all you listed except rice. problem we have is finding cleared land to have garden, too many trees here. on our hilly location we build "Hugelkutur" bed to slow down rain water from wash top soil down the creek. google Hugelkutur for more detail.



Quote:
Originally Posted by dhanu86 View Post
I'm asking what I can grow that needs little sunshine because I'm looking to move around the mountains. Are potatos hard to grow? I'd like to have squash, tomatos, rice, beans, greenbeans and probably fruit. This will be in the southern appalachain mountains. This area has plenty of rainfall and will be at the bottom of the mountains. Do you think I may need to have a special bed with its own soil?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-24-2011, 09:55 PM
 
Location: Nebraska
4,179 posts, read 5,777,120 times
Reputation: 9224
You can ONLY grow rice in a flooded parcel; hence the term "rice paddy". Rice is not a garden vegetable.

Your zone isn't the only important thing. Your type of soil (rock or clay), surrounding vegetation (tough to grow things in the woods) sunlight, rain or water accessibility, fertilizer - and in that zone you will also have to consider bug prevention as well as weed prevention. Being at the foot of the mountains doesn't mean you will get that much less sunshine than on flat land, depending on which side of the mountains you are on. Root crops like potatoes and carrots grow better in sandy or loamy soil.

Have you ever grown anything before? It isn't just a matter of throwing seeds in the ground...

"Probably fruit"?? What kinds of fruit? Apples, cherries, peaches, apricot trees; or blueberries (need more acid soil) gooseberries, blackberries, strawberries? Tree fruit takes a lot longer to grow but gives you a bigger harvest later. Bush fruit can produce a little the first year; the bigger the bushes get, the more fruit. You need to examine what grows in that area (which is dependent on soil as well) and determine what plants will grow.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-24-2011, 11:04 PM
 
2,065 posts, read 3,345,739 times
Reputation: 2555
The area encompassed by the term "Southern Appalachians" is pretty open ended and encompasses two full zones. Your "subtropical zone" reference says that you may need to back track and do a little learning about where you are moving to before planning out the garden. I live within that area and it doesn't require much unusual work to grow things, however if you have never grown a plant on purpose you may want to become a little more educated about the terms we use and what is required to grow each crop you are interested in. Once you have done that it will be easier to give you serious input.


The zone that Pitt Chick is referring to has a number and is commonly used by gardeners (and farmers) as a reference for what can be grown as well as what can overwinter in an area. Most of the southern end of the Appalachians (NC, TN and GA) will fall in zones 6b, 7a and 7b. To find your zone so you can answer the question try the following map:USNA - USDA Plant Hardiness Zone Map: South-East US For food crops this is not as important as knowing your soil's content, how to make compost (and use it) as well as how and when to start seeds in a greenhouse or protected environment. Knowing about pests, from bugs to fungi is also important, especially in the south with the longer growing season, higher heat and humidity and not very cold winters.


Depending on where your garden is you will most likely find you will be dealing with red clay. It may require some amending with organic materials to grow root vegetables like carrots but on the whole is fairly fertile. If the top soil has been stripped or compacted it may take more than amending but I don't think you will have to resort to Hugelkulture (that is the correct spelling if you would like to become informed). There are farms all around me growing a variety of vegetables, and fruits such as blueberries, grapes and apples.

Why do you feel you will have little sunshine? Do you own the land and know where and when the sun shines on it or is this an assumption because it is near mountains? Most food crops require more sunshine rather than less so it will make a big difference to know how much and what kind of sunshine strikes the area you will have a garden in to decide what crops might make it.

Before you plan soil changes or raised gardens ( imported top soil, lasagna gardens, Hugekulture and so on) you should get soil samples tested. You'd be surprised how fertile the land can be if it has not been disturbed. Most counties have agricultural extension offices that can help you with this and the fee for the test is usually small. The result will tell you about the soil conditions and the things you need to do to improve the soil for what you plan to grow from fertilizer to conditioners.

Rain may seem plentiful by some tables and graphs of previous or average rainfalls but there have been some intense droughts here in the past few years and rain is not evenly spaced, even in a good or "average" year.. You will need to consider what your water sources are before planting something that requires intensive water use.

In my neighborhood on the non farmed land my neighbors have been growing tomatoes, beans (several types), zucchini, eggplant, okra, lettuce, blueberries, cherries and strawberries. Down the road someone has muscadine grapes and walnuts growing.

Apologies SCGranny, I didn't see you post until after I posted mine.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-25-2011, 05:19 AM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
4,747 posts, read 3,520,059 times
Reputation: 3159
I see that you have Burlington, NJ listed as a location. Are you moving closer to the mountains or you just moved there?

You also have to worry about the indigenous animals. Deer, squirrels, woodchucks, rabbits, raccoons, voles and mice are just a few. All of these would love to enjoy the fruits of your labor. You would probably be best starting with raised beds that have deer mesh all the way around and seven feet high. It does not take too long until a free loader finds out about the new garden.

You even have to protect your new fruit trees. They are a great investment. But; rabbits will chew the bark of your young trees in the winter months. Buck will rub their horns to remove the velvet. Deer will eat every leaf off of small trees. Fruit trees should have wire cages and be wrapped if you have any of these critters close to you.

One other advantage of the raised beds is that you only put good soil inside. You can create these beds over poor or rocky soil.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-25-2011, 02:05 PM
 
Location: Murphy, NC
2,938 posts, read 5,222,887 times
Reputation: 1181
Haven't bough the land yet. I'm aiming to in time for the growing season. Never grown anything besides flowers. According to that link I'll be in in 7a. I'm moving to that area in a couple months, then renting for a couple months while I shop around to buy an acre. I'm asking beforehand about growing with little sunshine because the type of area I want doesn't look like it necessarily has as much sunshine as lower lands, and if it's a serious game-changer, I'll avoid that type of property altogether.

I was surprised how much more annual rain the mountains get compared to the surrounding areas because I never really seen much rain there in the past years, so I'll keep the possibility of drought and water in consideration. As for fruit, I like peaches and strawberries. NJ has the greatest peaches for the record.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-25-2011, 05:50 PM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
4,747 posts, read 3,520,059 times
Reputation: 3159
Quote:
Originally Posted by dhanu86 View Post
Haven't bough the land yet. I'm aiming to in time for the growing season. Never grown anything besides flowers. According to that link I'll be in in 7a. I'm moving to that area in a couple months, then renting for a couple months while I shop around to buy an acre. I'm asking beforehand about growing with little sunshine because the type of area I want doesn't look like it necessarily has as much sunshine as lower lands, and if it's a serious game-changer, I'll avoid that type of property altogether.

I was surprised how much more annual rain the mountains get compared to the surrounding areas because I never really seen much rain there in the past years, so I'll keep the possibility of drought and water in consideration. As for fruit, I like peaches and strawberries. NJ has the greatest peaches for the record.
Iím above Stroudsburg, PA at 1345 feet above sea level. Altitude makes a big difference. It can make the difference of a few weeks or longer on your growing season. A frost can occur earlier or later (depending on the season) the higher you go. A few hundred feet can make a big difference.

Rain can also vary - there is a large hill/mountain (in eastern terms - not in western terms) to my southeast. It splitís the weather pattern and I get less rain than five miles to the south or north of my house.

I had four beautiful peach trees for about fifteen years and then they died off. I do have four pear trees and five apple trees (which I am still harvesting). I also have a modest garden with raised beds and deer fencing surrounding the beds.

Since you do not have the land; you can take your pick of what is available. See how much shade you have and how good the earth is for planting. We have some farms on the top of our hills - but you have to be used to picking rocks.

Make sure you check out the parcel you want to buy after a torrential rain - make sure the land has good drainage. Immediately after Irene would have been a great time to check out land! You donít want to find out that you have a swimming pool for your front and back yards.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-26-2011, 11:34 PM
 
Location: Murphy, NC
2,938 posts, read 5,222,887 times
Reputation: 1181
Hi fisheye, looks like u live in the pocono mountains. I experience the same varying weather when I visit the appalachains, like rain here but not a drop over there.

I need a lot more research and driving to do before I pick my home but thanks everyone. Gardening is at the top of the list of must haves. I'll have more information in a few short months.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $89,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top