U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 10-28-2011, 03:04 PM
 
Location: Mtns of Waynesville,NC & Nokomis, FL
4,114 posts, read 7,601,533 times
Reputation: 5055

Advertisements

Usually, I can answer questions, and offer opins/advice here. And, I am usually damn good with trees & leaves, perennials etc, but I am stumped or, suffering from CRS...

Last weekend in NJ, I was helping my granddaughter with her fall leaf project and we nailed a couple dozen great leaf species from her local park. But, these 2 have me/us stumped.

I think the leaf on left is red maple; I have seen the leaf on the right, dozens of times but even my leaf books and the web are not giving me the answer, and my memorty banks are glitching.
Any ID help is appreciated.
Thanks, mD
Attached Thumbnails
Leaf ID Needed...-img_1951-reduce.jpg  
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-28-2011, 04:20 PM
 
26,886 posts, read 38,133,169 times
Reputation: 34827
A guess on the Left one: Tulip tree? We don't have them here so I'm not positive. Right one: A variety of oak I'd presume.

Edit: Hmmmm - not a tulip tree. Google images doesn't show one that is similar to your pic.

I did Google images for oak leaves. I had forgotten how many variations there are!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-28-2011, 04:44 PM
 
29,988 posts, read 35,848,534 times
Reputation: 12719
On the left, yes, a red maple. I cannot find the i.d. for the one on the right either. It is most similar to a post oak but that is not it. Do you have a photo with the leaf on a white background by chance? I have an "app" for leaf i.d. but it could not do it off the dark background. Or, if the OP has a smartphone, look at downloading the app "leafsnap" from itunes.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-28-2011, 04:53 PM
 
Location: Somewhere out there...
3,653 posts, read 7,262,257 times
Reputation: 3677
Acer rubrum, red maple on left and Quercus macrocarpa, Bur Oak on right.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-28-2011, 10:30 PM
 
Location: Reston
560 posts, read 1,067,947 times
Reputation: 447
white mulberry?

Trees of Wisconsin: Morus alba, white mulberry
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-29-2011, 12:43 AM
 
Location: Out there somewhere...
38,677 posts, read 45,030,920 times
Reputation: 106703
Quote:
Originally Posted by asitshouldbe View Post
Acer rubrum, red maple on left and Quercus macrocarpa, Bur Oak on right.
Bingo...Quercus macrocarpa photos - Google Search
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-29-2011, 08:40 AM
 
2,063 posts, read 6,241,213 times
Reputation: 2712
Oh boy.... I'm going to end up stirring the pot some more the way it looks. Sorry guys, I have to disagree with just about everyone. LOL

The red leaf looks most like a red maple however the second leaf is not an oak, it is a a mulberry (Morus) and most likely a red mulberry (Morus rubra). Here are the reasons why the oak ID is not quite right. The lobed shape is similar to leaves seen on the bur oak (aka Burr Oak) but there is a key difference. Look closely at the edges of the sample leaf and you'll notice that the margins are not smooth. When you see most of the oak varieties they are in some way lobed but they do not have toothed (serrated) edges (Before anyone has to point it out, there are exceptions with a different leaf shape).

The following are the first I could google showing the edges clearly for the Bur oak: The Majestic Bur Oak Tree Click on the upper right hand picture for the nicely photographed leaf. The edges are relatively smooth with no "teeth" or rounded little zig zags as seen in the original picture. The top picture in the next link shows diseased but intact leaves with the same smooth edge: What's Happening to Iowa's Bur Oaks? | Horticulture and Home Pest News The same with this one:Oak Savannas - Page 5 - Iowawhitetail forums

Both red and white mulberry have a leaves that can be any number of shapes (polymorphic) but that lobed variation is fairly common. All of their leaves have the rounded toothed edge seen in the OP picture. You can see 2 leaf shapes as well as the toothed edges here:
Ohio Trees - Mulberry
and the toothed edge more clearly here: Taste of the Wild: Red Mulberry (Morus rubra)

Now for the reason it is a Red Mulberry rather than a White has to do with how sharp looking the teeth are. The White tends to have slightly sharper toothed margins while the red has slightly more rounded toothed margins. A good comparison is in the following pdf from Purdue: http://www.ces.purdue.edu/extmedia/FNR/FNR_237.pdf
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-29-2011, 01:53 PM
 
Location: Mtns of Waynesville,NC & Nokomis, FL
4,114 posts, read 7,601,533 times
Reputation: 5055
Thank you to all the responders. And, esp J&Em: you reinforced my opin, after doing some more digging on the web since OP. The red maple was a given, but that mulberry was driving me crazy, as I knew I 'knew it', but couldn't nail it down.

The pics were from our son's house last weekend, shot to bring home with me for investigating here.

We spent a couple hours in their local park in south Jersey, and we collected 3+ dozen very interesting species of leaves for the G Daughter's project. Most I knew cold, the rest I looked up back at her house; those 2 stumped me, and as I was not back in the 'woods' there, I had no tree(s) to look at.

NEway, thank you all for the tips/ideas.
Best Regards, mD

Here is our granddaughter, my leaf project 'helper', that day...
Attached Thumbnails
Leaf ID Needed...-sara-leafhunting-park-10-22-11  
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-30-2011, 08:00 AM
 
2,063 posts, read 6,241,213 times
Reputation: 2712
You are welcome. Your leaf collection helper is adorable and I'm sure you both had a good time doing the project.

I know that feeling when you just know it is something familiar but can't quite put your finger on it. Mulberries are difficult even if you use a good tree ID key because of their polymorphism.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-01-2011, 09:24 AM
 
23,873 posts, read 17,577,017 times
Reputation: 12760
Quote:
Originally Posted by J&Em View Post
Oh boy.... I'm going to end up stirring the pot some more the way it looks. Sorry guys, I have to disagree with just about everyone. LOL

The red leaf looks most like a red maple however the second leaf is not an oak, it is a a mulberry (Morus) and most likely a red mulberry (Morus rubra). Here are the reasons why the oak ID is not quite right. The lobed shape is similar to leaves seen on the bur oak (aka Burr Oak) but there is a key difference. Look closely at the edges of the sample leaf and you'll notice that the margins are not smooth. When you see most of the oak varieties they are in some way lobed but they do not have toothed (serrated) edges (Before anyone has to point it out, there are exceptions with a different leaf shape).

The following are the first I could google showing the edges clearly for the Bur oak: The Majestic Bur Oak Tree Click on the upper right hand picture for the nicely photographed leaf. The edges are relatively smooth with no "teeth" or rounded little zig zags as seen in the original picture. The top picture in the next link shows diseased but intact leaves with the same smooth edge: What's Happening to Iowa's Bur Oaks? | Horticulture and Home Pest News The same with this one:Oak Savannas - Page 5 - Iowawhitetail forums

Both red and white mulberry have a leaves that can be any number of shapes (polymorphic) but that lobed variation is fairly common. All of their leaves have the rounded toothed edge seen in the OP picture. You can see 2 leaf shapes as well as the toothed edges here:
Ohio Trees - Mulberry
and the toothed edge more clearly here: Taste of the Wild: Red Mulberry (Morus rubra)

Now for the reason it is a Red Mulberry rather than a White has to do with how sharp looking the teeth are. The White tends to have slightly sharper toothed margins while the red has slightly more rounded toothed margins. A good comparison is in the following pdf from Purdue: http://www.ces.purdue.edu/extmedia/FNR/FNR_237.pdf
i'm impressed. rep on the way
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top