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Old 11-21-2011, 02:58 PM
 
Location: Virginia
18,717 posts, read 26,052,123 times
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I've never planted pansies before, but today Lowes was selling huge flats for $3 so I bought a few flats on a whim and filled an entire side garden. Most of the plants look healthy, although only 10 or so have blooms. (I bought maybe 80 plants total). My hope is they live through the winter and then bloom in the spring. Is there any particular steps I should take to help this happen? Should I deadhead, add miracle gro when I plant them, or anything else? They're on the east side of the house in a spot that's fairly protected and gets some sun. We'll get snow probably in late December/early January and then have snow off and on for 2-3 months. Sometimes we get heavy snows, but usually it's fairly mild here in VA. I usually use the snowblower 2-3 times a year, if that helps describe the snow we get.
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Old 11-21-2011, 03:33 PM
 
Location: southwestern PA
20,426 posts, read 35,707,564 times
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google got me this
The Duration of Pansies | eHow.com
among many others...
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Old 11-21-2011, 05:22 PM
 
Location: North Dakota
740 posts, read 1,723,045 times
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Hi, I have had pansies many times, and they generally survive winter with these basic steps.

Just make sure you mulch heavily, 3-4 inches deep with straw or wood chips. You will most likely think that your pansies are dead, but they are most likely dormant, and should recover come spring. When spring rolls around, thin out your mulch to about half.

When watering in the winter, try to avoid watering on the actual leaves and stem, and focus the roots. Also make sure that you water on warmer days, early afternoon. If you take your plants seriously, watch your local weather and make sure you do not water right before a deep freeze, as this can quickly kill your flowers.

Hope these tips help!

AA
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Old 11-21-2011, 09:44 PM
 
1,673 posts, read 5,526,009 times
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I also have grown pansies here in NC and in Va Beach as well. I have noticed over the years mine have not done as well unless they get a lot of sun. Also, where I currently live, the ground has heavy clay soil. Despite amending it and despite having full sun, pansies rarely will flower in this location. Just a couple of things to think about. Good luck!

P.S. Also, I have read that plants with no flowers actually do better so that might be a help as well.
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Old 11-22-2011, 09:50 AM
 
Location: Mtns of Waynesville,NC & Nokomis, FL
4,114 posts, read 7,601,533 times
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The newer 'winter' varietals are cake, and nearly bulletproof. imo...
We plant some in outside planters, sitting on our deck, at 5,000 ft elev., in Zone 5b/barely 6a.
That location gets sun, wind, rain, sleet, snow, serious winds, and may get below zero.

We come back to our Mtn house in April, and the pansies are doing fine, every year.
If they grow at our location, with literally no attention, they will grow for the OP, imo.
GL, mD
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Old 11-22-2011, 10:17 AM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
14,174 posts, read 22,496,291 times
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I have them in the ground here in Denver and they're still blooming. I just have to remember to water them since the sprinkler system is off now. But I don't do anything special and they always survive. They'll be blooming again in March. I have some in planter boxes and those don't make it. I assume the roots just get too cold being above ground, but they're still blooming right now.
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Old 11-22-2011, 11:37 AM
 
Location: Land of Free Johnson-Weld-2016
6,474 posts, read 13,406,838 times
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I planted pansies a couple of years ago in the Fall, and the plants overwintered in zone 7. I don't recall doing anything special. After the ones I planted did a disappearing act the following year, I discovered pansies are 'biennial.' So, they'll probably overwinter...but most likely for a single year. I decided to give up on them since I prefer perennials.
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Old 11-22-2011, 02:30 PM
 
Location: Sacramento, Placerville
2,442 posts, read 4,874,004 times
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Pansies/violas will tolerate mild winters. I don't know the how low they will survive, but low-20s only slows them down here in Sacramento. I think the gloomy days of December and January here do them more harm than freezing temperatures. The do much better if they get sunlight and have good drainage. They tend to get stem rot at the top of the root zone in cold, wet clay-like soils.
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Old 11-23-2011, 09:06 AM
 
23,903 posts, read 31,130,282 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Caladium View Post
I've never planted pansies before, but today Lowes was selling huge flats for $3 so I bought a few flats on a whim and filled an entire side garden. Most of the plants look healthy, although only 10 or so have blooms. (I bought maybe 80 plants total). My hope is they live through the winter and then bloom in the spring. Is there any particular steps I should take to help this happen? Should I deadhead, add miracle gro when I plant them, or anything else? They're on the east side of the house in a spot that's fairly protected and gets some sun. We'll get snow probably in late December/early January and then have snow off and on for 2-3 months. Sometimes we get heavy snows, but usually it's fairly mild here in VA. I usually use the snowblower 2-3 times a year, if that helps describe the snow we get.
They'll do fine. You don't need to do anything at all. I'm in VA too, and they come back every spring.
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Old 11-23-2011, 10:31 AM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
14,174 posts, read 22,496,291 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kinkytoes View Post
I planted pansies a couple of years ago in the Fall, and the plants overwintered in zone 7. I don't recall doing anything special. After the ones I planted did a disappearing act the following year, I discovered pansies are 'biennial.' So, they'll probably overwinter...but most likely for a single year. I decided to give up on them since I prefer perennials.
I've noticed that they get all "stingy" after surviving one Winter and then they hate the heat here in Denver. So I just yank them out in early May and replace them with fresh, Summer annuals.
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