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Old 09-13-2007, 06:46 AM
 
4 posts, read 34,114 times
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In the winter months, is it ok to put a lemon tree inside a backyard greenhouse? I am considering purchasing a small, portable one, for my lemon tree instead of bringing it inside the house (cost approx. $40.00). Last year, I had taken it indoors. Although the tree survived, it lost half it's branches and leaves. I do not know the benefits of a greenhouse during the winter months, or if it will protect my tree from the elements. Any suggestions? Westchester County, NY
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Old 09-13-2007, 07:32 AM
 
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Unless you can guarantee that it's going to be warm inside that little greenhouse (which I wonder about when we get long stretches of dark winter days), you Meyer lemon won't do well. It'd be better inside with a Gro-Light.
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Old 09-13-2007, 07:56 AM
 
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Thank you for your help, I think you're right. Looks like I'm going to have to invest in a Gro-Light.
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Old 10-04-2007, 03:36 PM
 
Location: woodland wa
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I have the same lemon tree with almost ripe lemons on it now. I have had it 2 years. I keep it in the house over the winter and when it starts to thaw I take it to the green house.
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Old 10-05-2007, 03:25 PM
 
Location: Out there somewhere...
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Lemons freeze at 32 degrees. You need to keep them in a warm greenhouse in the winter months.
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Old 10-06-2007, 02:22 PM
 
Location: on an island
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nitram View Post
Lemons freeze at 32 degrees. You need to keep them in a warm greenhouse in the winter months.
Hmm.
My neighbors have a Meyer lemon tree growing in their backyard.
I know winter gets cold here, with at least one freeze, maybe two.
Their Meyer looks gorgeous, with large, heavy fruit.
Maybe it does okay because we do not get *prolonged* chills?
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Old 10-06-2007, 02:42 PM
 
Location: Kingman AZ
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Have a Meyer lemon in the front yard....2 yrs old....last winter we had a long stretch of freezing weather.....this summer we had the hottest summer on record...[117 degrees]....and the tree keeps growing......[no lemons yet but.....can't have everything]
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Old 10-06-2007, 03:56 PM
 
Location: Out there somewhere...
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The Meyer Lemon Tree is a hardy variety and the best lemon tree for subtropical climates such as the gulf coast of the United States. The Meyer Lemon is not actually a real lemon but a cross between a lemon, a type of orange and a mandarin. While it retains most of the characteristics of a lemon, it has a bit less acidity, less bitterness, more sweetness and thinner skin. The skin of the Meyer Lemon lacks the typical zest of a real lemon. It has gained favor because it bears a heavy crop and it is a relatively hardy plant.

Meyer Lemon Trees perform best with full sun (at least 8 hours per day).
Regular water with well drained soil. No wet feet..
Hardy from 32 down to 25 degrees Fahrenheit (-4 degrees centigrade) depending on sustained length of freeze.
Preferred hardiness zones (U.S. - 9, 10, 11)
Can grow in a pot to restrict size or in areas that can suffer a heavy freeze.
Grows to 15 feet tall and wide or larger if planted in the ground.
Sandy, well-drained, dry, alkaline soil works best.
Tolerates acidic soil if necessary.
Low salt tolerance.
Rounded growth habit.
Medium rate of growth.
Used for Patio Tree, Screen, Fruit and as a Specimen Plant
The Meyer Lemon bears heavily when mature. Its crop size increases as the plant matures. It may bear 10 or more lemons even at 3 years old. The fruit is green in color until it matures. When mature on the tree, the Meyer Lemon changes to a yellow-orange color. That will take longer than you expect. The main crop matures in the summer. In a tropical climate, the Meyer Lemon Tree can bear fruit nearly all year long.

Guard against snails that can eat the buds and leaves of the Meyer Lemon tree.

After 3 or 4 years in a pot, you need to replace the soil since it will be exhausted of nutrients. You can either replant into a larger pot or cut away some of the outer roots with a sharp, strong knife and replant in the same pot but with fresh soil.

The Meyer Lemon Tree is named for Frank Meyer. He brought it to the United States from China in 1908 while working for the USDA. The tree became very popular and was widely grown until a virus that attacked Meyer Lemon Trees was discovered in the mid-1940s. Meyer Lemon Trees were banned in the United States in an effort to insure the safety of other lemon varieties from the virus. A new version of the Meyer Lemon Tree was developed that was virus-free and it was reintroduced in 1970. Since that time, the Meyer Lemon has become a favorite for the home grower. This variety is especially sweet and succulent. The Meyer Lemon has a thin skin and does not survive shipping well. As a result, the Meyer Lemon is not widely grown by commercial lemon growers.
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Old 10-07-2007, 03:18 AM
 
Location: on an island
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Thanks Nitram.
So I guess our winters are mild enough for Meyers.
We are only a mile from the beach but that seems to be far enough away in terms of salt tolerance, my neighbor's Meyer is so loaded with lemons it is bending down.
I would be interested in growing a Meyer in a pot.
dynimagelv, I hope you get fruit next year.
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Old 10-07-2007, 10:22 AM
 
Location: Kingman AZ
15,371 posts, read 33,766,194 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cil View Post
Thanks Nitram.
So I guess our winters are mild enough for Meyers.
We are only a mile from the beach but that seems to be far enough away in terms of salt tolerance, my neighbor's Meyer is so loaded with lemons it is bending down.
I would be interested in growing a Meyer in a pot.
dynimagelv, I hope you get fruit next year.
We keep hoping......have two peach trees that bear a ton of fruit but get stripped by evil neighborhood kids lol......some day I"ll catch em in the act and then...................
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