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Old 09-17-2012, 06:45 PM
 
Location: Aiken, South Carolina, US of A
1,751 posts, read 3,403,104 times
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Flamingo13,
I am going to cut pieces off of mine and root them over the winter.
I hate to do it, but my braided hibiscus is too big to bring inside.
It will hate my heating system, hot air, and get all kinds of bugs.
I am cutting about 8 cuttings off and keeping them in a nice vase
over the winter time.
They root pretty easy.
Then next April, when it warms up, I'm going to plant them in pots, and
possibly plant in the ground, I don't know, we will see.
You can root prune your plant if you can, you cut the lower roots off
when you repot. There will be more soil and less roots.
Then you can cut at least 1/3 off the top branches.
It will do better for you inside for the winter, and have room in the
pot to grow more roots.
Hibiscus seem to grow fast, and so do their roots.
I absolutely hate to leave this plant out. i love it so much,
but when your house is only so big, you gotta do what you
gotta do.
Good Luck with your plant.
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Old 09-18-2012, 08:41 AM
 
Location: Alexandria, VA
10,084 posts, read 18,012,433 times
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Thanks Butterfly4u - I keep the house pretty cool and keep it away from the heat vents... I'll try cutting it down by 1/3 and repotting. (hopefully, I won't have any bugs coming in
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Old 09-18-2012, 09:26 AM
 
3,647 posts, read 4,522,960 times
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Thanks so much, Butterfly! I have a big beautiful one in a pot and have been trying to decide what to do. A neighbor behind me loves potted hibiscus and has several. She has a sunroom (lucky dog!) and puts them in it. Another neighbor and I were thinking about using my extra bathroom but I'm leaning towards your idea.
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Old 09-18-2012, 11:06 PM
 
54 posts, read 86,166 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Butterfly4u View Post
Flamingo13,
I am going to cut pieces off of mine and root them over the winter.
I am cutting about 8 cuttings off and keeping them in a nice vase
over the winter time.
They root pretty easy..
Have you done this before and was it a success for you? Did you use hardwood, softwood or semisoftwood cuttings? (Hibiscus I only would use semisoftwood and in a moist medium with high RH) Being in horticulture I won't get technical, I wouldn't believe this would work in a vase of water, but then again I'm in IL and have never tried this on tropical hibiscus. And I am more than curious! Normally I never propagate plant material in water because the root system developes differently....(doesn't callus properly and it would just rot if it was hardwood) Unless you have plant material with adventitious preformed roots, (when the plant has roots growing along the stem when moisture is abundant, like in tomato plants you might have noticed) I would never throw it in a vase of water like a bouquet.
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Old 09-20-2012, 07:22 AM
 
3,647 posts, read 4,522,960 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grape-juliet View Post
Have you done this before and was it a success for you? Did you use hardwood, softwood or semisoftwood cuttings? (Hibiscus I only would use semisoftwood and in a moist medium with high RH) Being in horticulture I won't get technical, I wouldn't believe this would work in a vase of water, but then again I'm in IL and have never tried this on tropical hibiscus. And I am more than curious! Normally I never propagate plant material in water because the root system developes differently....(doesn't callus properly and it would just rot if it was hardwood) Unless you have plant material with adventitious preformed roots, (when the plant has roots growing along the stem when moisture is abundant, like in tomato plants you might have noticed) I would never throw it in a vase of water like a bouquet.
Thank you for posting. What are your suggestions for those of us who want to save our hibiscus? What I've been thinking about is based on trial and error. Whatever I tried last year didn't work. I had an uncle who used to dig up a banana tree every year and store it in an unheated carport storage area. Would anything similar to this work?
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Old 09-20-2012, 09:51 PM
 
54 posts, read 86,166 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by antiquesmountainapache View Post
Thank you for posting. What are your suggestions for those of us who want to save our hibiscus? What I've been thinking about is based on trial and error. Whatever I tried last year didn't work. I had an uncle who used to dig up a banana tree every year and store it in an unheated carport storage area. Would anything similar to this work?
Your Uncle's idea can work in a lot of situations, depending upon ones zone and the variety of Musa.

I'm in IL and our tropical hibiscus stay in the pot outside all summer then many bring them inside to overwinter in a dormant state. It will drop a lot of leaves but don't freak out and think you need to keep too lush. Give it light, cooler temps, less water, NO fert durring this time cuz it's not activly growing, give it a trim around Feb/March when you notice it starting to leaf bud then start some fert around April with a bit more water and light. If you notice 'bugs' on it I do the spraybottle with soapy water and mist it a few times during the day. That's the very basic needs of a lot of the plants we try to overwinter in the home.

One thing I've realized that was important is to read the Date the posts were posted here and what zone the poster is living in. Some things that you can do with success in April are not the things one should do in Sept/Oct! Good Luck to you all and Happy Hibiscus!
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Old 09-20-2012, 10:53 PM
 
3,647 posts, read 4,522,960 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grape-juliet View Post
Your Uncle's idea can work in a lot of situations, depending upon ones zone and the variety of Musa.

I'm in IL and our tropical hibiscus stay in the pot outside all summer then many bring them inside to overwinter in a dormant state. It will drop a lot of leaves but don't freak out and think you need to keep too lush. Give it light, cooler temps, less water, NO fert durring this time cuz it's not activly growing, give it a trim around Feb/March when you notice it starting to leaf bud then start some fert around April with a bit more water and light. If you notice 'bugs' on it I do the spraybottle with soapy water and mist it a few times during the day. That's the very basic needs of a lot of the plants we try to overwinter in the
One thing I've realized that was important is to read the Date the posts were posted here and what zone the poster is living in. Some things that you can do with success in April are not the things one should do in Sept/Oct! Good Luck to you all and Happy Hibiscus!
Sorry . . . I should have put the zone. I'm in Zone 7a.I may have left the "a" off in some other posts. Things get "zooey" sometimes (lol).
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Old 09-26-2012, 12:11 PM
 
658 posts, read 1,407,362 times
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Hibiscus are tropical plants, they don't tolerate coldiness below 50oF and semi moist (I read from the label attached with the tree), so I'll bring it indoor if it's getting colder.
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Old 09-28-2012, 11:13 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AngelBy View Post
Hibiscus are tropical plants, they don't tolerate coldiness below 50oF and semi moist (I read from the label attached with the tree), so I'll bring it indoor if it's getting colder.
Not all Hibiscus are tropical , which you have, many species are temperate or called by a common name garden hibiscus or rose of sharon or rose mallow. The genus includes both annual and perennial herbaceous plants, as well as woody shrubs and small trees. Everything depends upon the ZONE you live in and the variety of plant material you have. You have to know your plant material in order to know how to treat it.
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Old 10-03-2012, 07:17 PM
 
Location: Alexandria, VA
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Here's my plan, we'll see how it goes: I will pull the entire 8'+ plant out of the pot, knock off the dirt, cut it down by about 1/2, put fresh soil in the pot and repot it, give it some time to accilimate outside and then bring it in and hope for the best.
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