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Old 04-17-2012, 01:23 PM
 
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I'm looking for some (hopefully perennial in zone 6) plants to spill over the sides of my raised cedar beds. I love bacopa and calabrachoa, though I'm pretty sure they are annuals. Would love to get to the point where I have mostly perennials and can just add a few new things each year.
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Old 04-17-2012, 01:34 PM
 
Location: Alexandria, VA
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Try Portulaca, one of my favs.
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Old 04-17-2012, 02:35 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fields of Green View Post
I'm looking for some (hopefully perennial in zone 6) plants to spill over the sides of my raised cedar beds. I love bacopa and calabrachoa, though I'm pretty sure they are annuals. Would love to get to the point where I have mostly perennials and can just add a few new things each year.
Are the beds full sun, partial or shade? Are you looking for a plant that cascades as an edging for other plants (i.e. shorter) or fills the bed and cascades?
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Old 04-17-2012, 03:21 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Flamingo13 View Post
Try Portulaca, one of my favs.
Moss rose... very nice! I'll look for them. I wonder since they're from a hot climate if they like the tons of rain we get in Southwestern Washington.
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Old 04-17-2012, 03:25 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Va-Cat View Post
Are the beds full sun, partial or shade? Are you looking for a plant that cascades as an edging for other plants (i.e. shorter) or fills the bed and cascades?
Hmm, I guess they would be considered full sun because they're out in the open with no trees above; the house shades this area until late morning in summer. I'm just north of Portland, Oregon so our sunny season is short and not too hot.

I think I'd be happy with either cascades or fills and cascades!
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Old 04-17-2012, 03:37 PM
 
Location: Beautiful Rhode Island
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I've had good luck with creeping phlox. It grows fast, cascades, and is easy to divide.
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Old 04-17-2012, 07:25 PM
 
Location: oregon
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Hi
I live down the road from you in Salem and moss roses grow great up here..they reseed themselfs and don't care what the exposure is..
Good luck.
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Old 04-17-2012, 07:39 PM
 
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Portulaca are annuals, just like Calibrachoa and Bacopa, for most of the USA, and will not survive a zone 6 winter. I have some every year and love how they thrive in the hot dry places other plants have a hard time with.

There are lots of low growing plants that will also spill and hang but most do not bloom all spring and summer. Hollytree has a good suggestion with the creeping phlox. I love the way mine are covering and spilling over stacked rock retaining walls. They bloom for about 6 weeks in the spring ta make pretty green mats the rest of the year. Other similar low plants with a one season bloom (spring) would be candytuft I've really fallen in love with the sky blue of my Lithadora which began blooming several weeks ago and last year bloomed on and off until September. I've seen a beautiful display of creeping zinnia that might also work.

Snow in Summer (Cerastium Tomentosum) would work but it can be a take over artist (ask me how I know) and Creeping Speedwell (Veronica Repens) is pretty but can also spread if happy. Delosperma (Ice Plant) is a possibility, as some are hardy enough and some will hang over the edge of pots and walls beautifully.

I hope that gives you an idea or two!
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Old 04-17-2012, 10:30 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fields of Green View Post
Hmm, I guess they would be considered full sun because they're out in the open with no trees above; the house shades this area until late morning in summer. I'm just north of Portland, Oregon so our sunny season is short and not too hot.

I think I'd be happy with either cascades or fills and cascades!
If you want a hardy perennial as a fill cascade, consider Shasta daisies. Great color all summer, incredibly hardy and a nice cut flower too.

Plant Care Guides :: National Gardening Association

If you want a cascade effect pick a taller variety and don't stake them up. They willl spill over the edge with a nice effect
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Old 04-18-2012, 09:20 AM
 
Location: Land of Free Johnson-Weld-2016
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Default Z-7.

I concur with the creeping phlox: phlox subulata. It supposedly likes it "dryer," so do a little checking to see how it fares in PNW's weather. My phlox did awesome although we got a LOT of rain last year. They're in full to mostly sunny areas, and in slightly raised beds, but got soaked.


A plant which is currently cascading over my little retaining wall and looking FABULOUS is Creeping Jenny. It can be borderline invasive, and can "Infiltrate" grass, so it is suggested to let it "cascade" over things and not plant it adjacent to a "lawn." Personally, I love the stuff. It has yellow flowers and grows in sun or shade, and in my humid lower level entrance area. It has covered the ground fabulously under my various ornamental trees.

But as a lover of natives, I responsibly suggest checking to see if there are any native groundcovers which may fit the bill: Native plant resources for the Pacific Northwest
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