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Old 05-06-2012, 06:07 PM
 
2,063 posts, read 6,247,207 times
Reputation: 2712

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mary Ann789 View Post
Earlier this spring, I found my young veggies getting annihilated over night. I found grubs in the soil. I am gardening in a 4'x4'x1' raised garden with a weed cloth on the bottom. After digging and digging around, I realized my best course was to meticulously remove the soil, removing every grub I found. I ended up with over 20 plus 2 tomato hornworms in cases. Once I got all the grubs, my problems with grubs taking my food decreased to zero.

I am now treating the soil with Bt (milky spore) because of grubs and fungas gnats. Those gnats love manure and I've got lots
You have two different things mixed together. Bt stands for Bacillus thuringiensis which is short lived and used to kill all kinds of caterpillars as well as grubs. It needs frequent reapplication. Milky spore is Bacillus popilliae and it is specific to grubs, and only grubs, and stays in the soil to kill future grubs for years to come. Both are considered relatively safe but if you have a butterfly garden Bt would not be the best choice since it can't distinguish between "good" caterpillars and bad. Bt does a good job on fungus gnats which are attracted to anything damp and decomposing (fungi activity).

Quote:
Originally Posted by nmnita View Post
where do you get the organic soaps? The past 2 years we have had Japenese Beetles coming out of the woodwork I think. Well not realy but they love the green beans. I have no idea how to get rid or them and don't want to use anything that will endanger the garden soil unless I have to.
Quote:
Originally Posted by patriot201 View Post
Organic insecticidal soaps are available just about everywhere-- Wal-Mart, Lowes, Home Depot, garden centers, etc.

Milky Spore is a great control to use because it truly only affects white grubs. Your soil will not be toxic to anything other than white grubs.
Patriot201 answered for me. There are several organic brands you usually find at any hardware store, box store and most nurseries. Look for brands like "Safer" "Garden Safe" "Bonide" and "Epoma" to name a few off the top of my head.

There are many recipes out there for homemade versions but they don't always seem to work as well on all the critters they are supposed to kill. To make a homemade version add about 2 Tablespoons of dish-washing detergent (Dawn or Palmolive type detergents) to a gallon of water and add a couple of drops of oil (any cooking oil) and mix well. Put into a clean spray bottle and spray every beetle you can find. They have to be sprayed with the soap directly for it to be effective since the residue does not effect them. Some people like the smell and action of Murphy's Oil Soap in water, mixed about 4 Tablespoons per gallon of water.

Insecticidal soaps must hit the insect to be effective and this goes for white flies and aphids as well. This means you have to use it every day that you see pests and you have to spray the pests, not the plant.
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Old 05-07-2012, 03:11 AM
 
672 posts, read 1,738,717 times
Reputation: 1173
Quote:
Originally Posted by J&Em View Post
You have two different things mixed together. Bt stands for Bacillus thuringiensis which is short lived and used to kill all kinds of caterpillars as well as grubs. It needs frequent reapplication. Milky spore is Bacillus popilliae and it is specific to grubs, and only grubs, and stays in the soil to kill future grubs for years to come. Both are considered relatively safe but if you have a butterfly garden Bt would not be the best choice since it can't distinguish between "good" caterpillars and bad. Bt does a good job on fungus gnats which are attracted to anything damp and decomposing (fungi activity)...*respectfully snipped*
Thanks for information. There's a lot of misinformation on the internet. I'll have to go back and find out how I connected Bt with milky spore because I think it was at a County Extension website

Last edited by Mary Ann789; 05-07-2012 at 03:12 AM.. Reason: fixed spelling
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Old 05-07-2012, 03:36 AM
 
Location: My little patch of Earth
6,193 posts, read 4,368,892 times
Reputation: 3042
A full organic method that is better for the garden is 'beneficial nematodes'.

Not available at the regular garden stores but at a nursery type local store.
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Old 06-28-2014, 11:16 AM
 
1 posts, read 923 times
Reputation: 10
The Grubs do indeed become Japanese beetles or chaffer beetles. Milky spore does kill the Japanese beetle grub but not the chaffer beetle........... it usually takes a season for control. They are really bad in my area this year............................... NE INDIANA.......planning on huge Japanese beetle problem
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Old 10-06-2014, 07:01 PM
 
Location: Houston, Texas
40 posts, read 29,715 times
Reputation: 29
We planted a garden egg plant late spring because the winter took so long to be over in Houston. It was also planted in the shade (our second try, didn't bear the first time either) it grew to a good height, about 2.5 feet. Put out buds about 6 different times but the fruits didn't hold. Can someone tell me what went wrong? To make it worse, we transplanted it into a pot and put it where it can get some sunlight, what did we see under it? a hugh, fat white grub, of course that was his last meal.

It appears we both have black thumbs for veggies.
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Old 10-06-2014, 10:31 PM
 
Location: Out there somewhere...
38,697 posts, read 45,086,710 times
Reputation: 106806
Grubs, how to control them...
Grub Worm Control: Tips On How To Get Rid Of Lawn Grubs
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Old 10-07-2014, 09:28 AM
 
3,339 posts, read 7,186,600 times
Reputation: 4221
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mary Ann789 View Post
Earlier this spring, I found my young veggies getting annihilated over night. I found grubs in the soil. I am gardening in a 4'x4'x1' raised garden with a weed cloth on the bottom. After digging and digging around, I realized my best course was to meticulously remove the soil, removing every grub I found. I ended up with over 20 plus 2 tomato hornworms in cases. Once I got all the grubs, my problems with grubs taking my food decreased to zero.

I am now treating the soil with Bt (milky spore) because of grubs and fungas gnats. Those gnats love manure and I've got lots
Bt is NOT Milky Spore. They are nothing alike. As the Brits say, they're like "chalk and cheese". Bt in your soil might kill fungus gnat larvae, but that's about it.

Grubs in the soil under vegetables are not decimating anything overnight. They're having minimal if any effect on your vegetables.

Removing every grub is a waste of time.
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