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Old 05-16-2012, 10:04 AM
 
Location: Cardiff, Wales
19 posts, read 30,687 times
Reputation: 29

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Hello! Last year, my boyfriend acquired some chilli pepper seeds from some magazine he bought, and he went about planting them. They grew incredibly slowly, but then... nothing.

In the past few weeks, however, something has been growing in the pot! I looked on Google, and it looks like no chilli plant on there, but I looked at the neighbours' flowerbeds, and if it's a weed, it's localised to our pot only!

Here's a picture:



Do we have a chilli plant, or are we cultivating some sort of weed?
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Old 05-16-2012, 10:44 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
31,165 posts, read 57,302,589 times
Reputation: 52030
That doesn't look like any pepper plant I've ever seen. I have no idea what it is!
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Old 05-16-2012, 11:07 AM
 
Location: South Carolina
13,105 posts, read 17,646,574 times
Reputation: 22454
Im sorry to say but I do believe that is a weed . I could be wrong but I have seen chilli plants and that does not look like one to me ? maybe someone on here can tell better than I can .Good luck and I hope your chilli plants come up dear have fun and a great day .
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Old 05-16-2012, 02:05 PM
 
Location: Cardiff, Wales
19 posts, read 30,687 times
Reputation: 29
Thank you both for your responses. I do have another question, if anyone's able to answer.

Without a greenhouse or any special equipment, what's the hottest type of chilli one can grow just in a pot in the garden, using standard compost?
Do bear in mind, typical British climate

We like our spicy food, like, and we figure growing our own will be awesome.
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Old 05-16-2012, 04:49 PM
 
434 posts, read 419,924 times
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It's not any pepper plant that I have seen
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Old 05-17-2012, 12:32 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
31,165 posts, read 57,302,589 times
Reputation: 52030
Quote:
Originally Posted by Irkalla View Post
Without a greenhouse or any special equipment, what's the hottest type of chilli one can grow just in a pot in the garden, using standard compost?
Do bear in mind, typical British climate
Peppers do like a hot, dry growing season. But I've successfully grown peppers in cool, wet summers as well.

A pepper called Bhut Jolokia is supposedly the hottest pepper known to this planet, but I'm just as happy with habanero (scotch bonnet) or jalapeno. Thai and serrano peppers are hot. Some banana peppers are hotter than others.

Most peppers, too, get hotter if you let them turn red or orange on the vine. For instance, a poblano allowed to turn red on the plant is hotter (and has a richer flavor) than one picked when it's still green.
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