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Old 05-18-2012, 04:17 PM
 
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I had regular impatiens in my garden in PA. On hot sunny days I generally watered them twice a day and they were lovely.
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Old 05-18-2012, 04:32 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by syracusa View Post
Is what I have New Guinea (link to pic above)?
Yes. New Guinea impatiens have larger flowers and darker, longer leaves.

Regular impatiens have smaller flowers and lighter green, rounded leaves:

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Old 05-18-2012, 11:25 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2cold View Post
I had regular impatiens in my garden in PA. On hot sunny days I generally watered them twice a day and they were lovely.
How was the soil to the touch when you watered them?

Did they dry up so quickly between the twice a day waterings? Or did you water on top of still wet soil knowing that they simply want lots of extra water? If so, weren't you afraid of root rot?
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Old 05-18-2012, 11:30 PM
 
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Originally Posted by no kudzu View Post
I grew impatiens by the flat in my Atlanta (south) garden in deep shade and they reseeded themselves every year.
What do you mean by that?

Assuming they make it to the end of the summer,what do I do with them after that? Bring them in? Over-winter them?...Have no clue.

Quote:
Originally Posted by no kudzu View Post
but if your leaves are burned and crunchy they must be getting too much sun from someplace if only for a little while.

could it be too much heat from the window they are close to?
Hmmm...good question. Next to that window there's no sun; but maybe some sun would reflect on it during the day...not sure. I'll have to study it more carefully...maybe change their place.
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Old 05-19-2012, 06:42 AM
 
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Quote:
I had regular impatiens in my garden in PA. On hot sunny days I generally watered them twice a day and they were lovely.
Quote:
How was the soil to the touch when you watered them?

Did they dry up so quickly between the twice a day waterings? Or did you water on top of still wet soil knowing that they simply want lots of extra water? If so, weren't you afraid of root rot?
You know, I don't think I ever checked the soil.
Mine were along the east facing wall of my house, so the ones on one end would get some hot midday sun for an hour or so.

I'd go out and sometimes see that the ones on the far side that were out in the sun the longest looked all shriveled and droopy, so I'd give them a good watering, and a little extra for the other ones. Once I was aware of the problem I'd try and make sure I gave the sun exposed ones some extra water around noon.
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Old 05-19-2012, 07:17 AM
 
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Like NoKudzu I've grown standard impatiens by the flats in two very different gardens. I've never considered them fussy but they do need moisture to make it through heat. The variety that you posted a picture of looks like a New Guinea Impatiens which is more sun tolerant and usually does well in pots. I've had them in mixed planters on my deck in a similar southern heat and slightly more than half a day of direct sun (but not the hottest afternoon sun). They can tolerate some sun as long as they are watered well and are among the easiest plants to grow.

In pots in a warm climate (if NoKudzu is right about you being in Atlanta) all varieties of impatiens will need to be watered more heavily than in a cooler climate. On hot days (over 90 degrees) they may need to be watered again in the afternoon, especially if they have longer exposure to direct sun. Root rot will occur more readily when it is cooler and/or the plant sits in water.

From your description of wilting, rain revival and loss of flowers there are some things that you could be doing to kill your plants. You can figure out which applies from the following paragraphs.

Potted impatiens do not survive well if alternating too dry and too wet conditions occur and usually drop flowers at first when this happens. If there is no drainage out of the pot bottom they are probably sitting in water some of the time and dried out some of the time. All impatiens need to be in consistent moisture where they are not sitting in very wet soil for very long but not allowed to dry out either. This is why in ground impatiens are generally easier to grow. If rain made them look much better I suspect they have been frequently dried out.

New Guinea impatiens do better when they get some sun and aren't in deep shade. They will loose flowers first, and then gradually show signs of leaf loss. If they get absolutely no sun and alternate between having "wet feet" and being dried out and wilting they will brown and die (fungus and root rot take hold easily then).

Many inexperienced gardeners seem to believe that "feeding" plants is the only way to make them better if they show signs of distress. Fertilizer is probably the last thing a distressed plant needs since it burns roots and causes them to try and increase leaf growth when they do not have adequate roots to take up more water. Impatiens are low fertilizer plants anyway so it compounds the problem. If you've been doing some form of liquid fertilizer every time you water, stop! Over fertilized plants will stop producing flowers first, then leaves will turn brown next, which is what you said happened.

To keep this plant alive... Repot it into a larger pot with drain holes and fresh potting soil. Try to use soil that hasn't been prefertilized. Water frequently enough for the soil to be constantly moist but not soaking wet feeling. On cooler days you may need to skip watering and on very hot days you may need to water more than once for a potted plant (in ground plants rarely need this). DO NOT fertilize at all for a while. I use granular slow release fertilizer in my pots mixed in below the seedlings in early spring and might add some come late July or August.
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Old 05-19-2012, 10:02 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by J&Em View Post

In pots in a warm climate (if NoKudzu is right about you being in Atlanta) all varieties of impatiens will need to be watered more heavily than in a cooler climate.
Yes, I am in Atlanta but no, I still don't know what "watering heavily" means. To me, if the soil is still wet, the plants doesn't need more water.


Quote:
Originally Posted by J&Em View Post
On hot days (over 90 degrees) they may need to be watered again in the afternoon, especially if they have longer exposure to direct sun.
They didn't get much exposure at all to direct sun but they may have received a bit more than I thought in that corner that I judged to be constantly in the shade. It looks like there is a brief part of the day when it gets some sun - but not much and hardly direct.

Quote:
Originally Posted by J&Em View Post
Root rot will occur more readily when it is cooler and/or the plant sits in water.
Never let them sit in the water. At least not the kind that accumulates in a saucer. They do have good drainage holes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by J&Em View Post
Potted impatiens do not survive well if alternating too dry and too wet conditions occur and usually drop flowers at first when this happens.
This may have happened a bit as I allowed the soil to get just slightly damp in the beginning, and only after that watered. This is what the advise is for so many other plants (let the soil dry between waterings) but this one clearly doesn't like that. The impatient wants lots of water.

Quote:
Originally Posted by J&Em View Post
All impatiens need to be in consistent moisture where they are not sitting in very wet soil for very long but not allowed to dry out either. This is why in ground impatiens are generally easier to grow. If rain made them look much better I suspect they have been frequently dried out.
May have been. I just wish I could understand what "dried out" looks like. They were never allowed to have the soil actually DRY. But I did wait until it got just slightly damp; then they were even almost wet and they still tended towards drooping...then the rain came and made them soaking wet, and only THEN they would come back!

I was so afrait to keep them soaking wet all the time as I had another one that died on me and I was sure it was because of root rot. Turns out it may have been for too little water. I hear all the time that the no 1 killer of plants is people over-watering them...so I didn't even know what to believe anymore.

I may have also been influenced by the way I grow my other flowers. I have some geraniums which I do not water weeks in a row because I let them literally dry out first and only then water them. They love the slight abuse. Then I also have African Violets indoors and again, the advise is to NEVER over-water and wait until soil is dry. ...

It is apparent that impatients love soaking wet and completely away from sun.

I still feel OK that they continue to last past Begonias which I ALWAYS manage to kill in 2 months top.


Quote:
Originally Posted by J&Em View Post
New Guinea impatiens do better when they get some sun and aren't in deep shade. They will loose flowers first, and then gradually show signs of leaf loss. If they get absolutely no sun and alternate between having "wet feet" and being dried out and wilting they will brown and die (fungus and root rot take hold easily then).

Many inexperienced gardeners seem to believe that "feeding" plants is the only way to make them better if they show signs of distress. Fertilizer is probably the last thing a distressed plant needs since it burns roots and causes them to try and increase leaf growth when they do not have adequate roots to take up more water. Impatiens are low fertilizer plants anyway so it compounds the problem. If you've been doing some form of liquid fertilizer every time you water, stop! Over fertilized plants will stop producing flowers first, then leaves will turn brown next, which is what you said happened.

To keep this plant alive... Repot it into a larger pot with drain holes and fresh potting soil. Try to use soil that hasn't been prefertilized. Water frequently enough for the soil to be constantly moist but not soaking wet feeling. On cooler days you may need to skip watering and on very hot days you may need to water more than once for a potted plant (in ground plants rarely need this). DO NOT fertilize at all for a while. I use granular slow release fertilizer in my pots mixed in below the seedlings in early spring and might add some come late July or August.
I will withhold all fertilizer for a while and watch more carefully the watering. However, they seem to want much more water than I have them credit for.
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Old 05-23-2012, 07:56 PM
 
Location: Aiken, South Carolina, US of A
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Impatience only like filtered sun.
Move them under a tree and they will be fine.
I always grew them under a tree in the shade.
I think I might grow them in my woods, thanks for the idea someone.
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Old 05-24-2012, 11:31 AM
 
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I have new guinea impatiens growing in heavy stone urns in the shade of my front porch and they are doing great. I think they like shelter from direct sun. The heavy pots probably help keep moisture in. I don't water them very often as the soil tends to stay moist there. Good luck with your impatiens!
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Old 05-02-2015, 07:27 AM
 
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I got new guinea impatient I put out side and it got to much sun and they dying what could I do to help it
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