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Old 06-11-2012, 03:33 PM
 
Location: Middle Tennessee
183,802 posts, read 74,960,655 times
Reputation: 128814

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cattknap View Post
Nomadicus - do you mulch? I don't mean little rocks - I would never used those on flower beds - they work their way into the soil and you have a mess.

I noticed you live in Florida so you probably can grow things throughout the year - not sure. I am originally from So. California and I gardened all year long but never had weeds like yours. We just hand weeded, added lots of organic material and top mulched either with organic compost or undyed shredded cedar. I kept on top of the weeds - weeding several times a week but there was never much to weed.

I would never ever use Round-Up in a flower garden because I don't think it is necessary if you adopt good gardening practices (that you use regularly like weeding several times a week, using a good top mulch, etc).

If I had your weed patch, I would dig the weeds up, shake off as much soil as possible, add organic material, plant and top mulch with a compost or shredded cedar and the be very judicious about weeding regularly.
A few years ago I would have. But with severe spinal injury a lot of things are not an option now. I was specific about using Roundup only where there were only woody shrubs not effected by Roundup. Documented with photos. The rock is very large white marble. Black plastic porous underneath. I'd never use roundup near annual type plants. It has its place. I've been EPA certified and know exactly what I'm doing. Now I'm retired and only do my own stuff. I'm cleaning up a mess I took over for a few months. Then the owner can do as he pleases. I just want everything shipshape when he comes back. He is going to have to use pots on top of the rocks due to flooding. Any thing coming through the rocks can be kept knocked down safely with Roundup when the wind is not blowing. Common sense goes a long way.
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Old 06-11-2012, 03:37 PM
 
Location: Prospect, KY
5,288 posts, read 17,482,726 times
Reputation: 6515
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nomadicus View Post
A few years ago I would have. But with severe spinal injury a lot of things are not an option now. I was specific about using Roundup only where there were only woody shrubs not effected by Roundup. Documented with photos. The rock is very large white marble. Black plastic porous underneath. I'd never use roundup near annual type plants. It has its place. I've been EPA certified and know exactly what I'm doing. Now I'm retired and only do my own stuff. I'm cleaning up a mess I took over for a few months. Then the owner can do as he pleases. I just want everything shipshape when he comes back. He is going to have to use pots on top of the rocks due to flooding. Any thing coming through the rocks can be kept knocked down safely with Roundup when the wind is not blowing. Common sense goes a long way.
As my husband always says, a mans gotta do what a mans gotta do (or something like that) - good luck to you... so sorry about your medical issues.

Last edited by Cattknap; 06-11-2012 at 03:45 PM..
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Old 06-11-2012, 07:05 PM
 
Location: In the Pearl of the Purchase, Ky
6,957 posts, read 12,372,463 times
Reputation: 29133
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nomadicus View Post
Woody stem plants are not harmed. Now petunias will bite the dust. I soaked the trunks of an orange tree, an oak tree, and a lovely hibiscus bush. All are well be grass is dead. Now the grass can't steal water and nutrients from non weed plants. In young non bearing commercial orange some gets on citrus leaves and the trees to fine.
Something the instructor of our agronomy class told us could be done (and I've seen the results of it) is a way to use Round Up to kill a tree. If you can drill a hole into a tree without being caught and drill it to the center, pour full strength Round up in the hole. It does kill the tree.
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Old 06-11-2012, 07:09 PM
 
Location: Middle Tennessee
183,802 posts, read 74,960,655 times
Reputation: 128814
Quote:
Originally Posted by kygman View Post
Something the instructor of our agronomy class told us could be done (and I've seen the results of it) is a way to use Round Up to kill a tree. If you can drill a hole into a tree without being caught and drill it to the center, pour full strength Round up in the hole. It does kill the tree.
That's right. It says that on the label of the full strength. I may have do try it to kill a Brazilian pepper tree which is an invasive species. Spraying the tree would not hurt it with the weed formula. The label is very specific about using it full strength.
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Old 06-12-2012, 08:23 AM
 
Location: zone 5
7,330 posts, read 12,544,110 times
Reputation: 9578
I've wondered before if there had ever been a closed thread on the gardening forum. If there was, I bet Roundup was the topic!
For myself, I do have some Roundup, but I use it very seldom, as a last resort. It can be a Godsend, but the less chemicals we put into the earth, the better off we all are. But if you're unable to get rid of weeds any other way, I've heard Roundup is not as bad as some other herbicides.
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Old 06-12-2012, 09:02 AM
 
Location: West Coast
82 posts, read 272,784 times
Reputation: 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by legacy0133 View Post
Please do not use any chemicals in your lawn, it is not healthy to be spraying chemicals. It has negative effects on the environment and it is bad for your health. Check out beyondpesticides.org a non-profit to learn about just how bad the ecosystem is being destroyed by all the chemicals being used. I am disabled with a horrific illness, stemming from a chemical plant where I was born. please reconsider your chemical practices...
lol ...

I think the most balanced advice is provided by the Portland expert www.mdvaden.com in the landscape tips section accessed from the special advice topic menu.

The one I find there now is titled with a question about drinking Roundup. A topic I thought was there, but can't see right now, was about increased frequency of use resulting in less chemical going down. It might be stuffed in one of the other sections like soil care.

Anyway, it's a more realistic read than throwing around "horrific" and "destroyed". Just because people use some products in excess for their landscaping does not mean an entire ecosystem is being destroyed.

Considering how prolific the use of Roundup is presently, much less impact could be achieved merely by encouraging and showing people how to use less, and more efficiently.

Personally, I've found that keeping mulch like barkdust a bit thicker like 2" to 3" deep makes it a lot easier to periodically weed by hand because the roots pull loose pretty easy and the bark shakes off.
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Old 06-12-2012, 10:23 AM
 
Location: Bel Air, California
20,344 posts, read 20,415,914 times
Reputation: 31583
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nomadicus View Post
Now you know I wouldn't lecture anyone who disagrees. Seems I'm the one who is getting lectured. Anyway as promised real photos of real roundup jobs I did about two weeks ago. Number one is an area around an orange tree that was in a state of Hospice care. Now it is back to intensive care but thriving finally. Eventually an 8' circle will be cleared for pineapples to grow under it one it gets a canopy. It is a multi fruiting citrus tree.



Now we have a woody stem Hibiscus that was overtaken with grass. I sprayed grass and the woody stems of the Hibiscus and with a small shot of food it is coming back to life with many blooms.



Now for an oak tree that is being cleaned around in prep for annual flowers once the weather cools. Petunias I think. Below the oak tree is a place that the roundup failed to kill much of anything. This whole area needs to be stripped to dirt, filled with rock and potted plants used as it is a lake after just a little rain now. Guess the weed whacker will come into play.




No trick photography or photoshop effects. All photos just sized for CD. No cropping either. Judge for yourselves as to whether or not Roundup kills everything. I won't go off topic and tell you how Roundup saves literally tons of precious top soil every year. But I might just start a thread explaining that now. Have a great day with the thread.
Aha! I see you killed that big white-striped, green snake with your wanton use of Round-up!
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Old 06-12-2012, 01:28 PM
 
Location: Middle Tennessee
183,802 posts, read 74,960,655 times
Reputation: 128814
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghengis View Post
Aha! I see you killed that big white-striped, green snake with your wanton use of Round-up!
Actually I think that green snake was part of the same purchase as the roundup. Ya know, that snake would still be sleeping comfortably if he had not got in my shopping cart.

Last edited by Nomadicus; 06-12-2012 at 02:20 PM..
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Old 06-12-2012, 02:01 PM
 
25,631 posts, read 29,103,055 times
Reputation: 23049
Quote:
Originally Posted by Obi_Wan_Kenobi View Post
lol ...

I think the most balanced advice is provided by the Portland expert www.mdvaden.com in the landscape tips section accessed from the special advice topic menu.

The one I find there now is titled with a question about drinking Roundup. A topic I thought was there, but can't see right now, was about increased frequency of use resulting in less chemical going down. It might be stuffed in one of the other sections like soil care.

Anyway, it's a more realistic read than throwing around "horrific" and "destroyed". Just because people use some products in excess for their landscaping does not mean an entire ecosystem is being destroyed.

Considering how prolific the use of Roundup is presently, much less impact could be achieved merely by encouraging and showing people how to use less, and more efficiently.

Personally, I've found that keeping mulch like barkdust a bit thicker like 2" to 3" deep makes it a lot easier to periodically weed by hand because the roots pull loose pretty easy and the bark shakes off.
The force is strong with this one.
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Old 06-12-2012, 02:22 PM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
69,258 posts, read 79,427,308 times
Reputation: 38621
Quote:
Originally Posted by subject2change View Post
I've wondered before if there had ever been a closed thread on the gardening forum. If there was, I bet Roundup was the topic!
For myself, I do have some Roundup, but I use it very seldom, as a last resort. It can be a Godsend, but the less chemicals we put into the earth, the better off we all are. But if you're unable to get rid of weeds any other way, I've heard Roundup is not as bad as some other herbicides.
I think most of us try and use sensible judgement and only use any poisons as a last resort, but there are times when we can thank the research specialists for developing chemicals that can do more good than harm when used correctly and sparingly.

Nita
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