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Old 06-11-2012, 03:46 PM
 
Location: michigan
58 posts, read 81,114 times
Reputation: 70

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I transplanted a rose bush the other day. I looked up some information on line and followed the most suggested rules to have a successful transplant - water immensely the day before, prune back to 6-9 inches above ground level, flood the hole and area where the plant is going, water twice daily (It got hot the next few days), etc. The first day it showed signs of stress (common) and then appeared to perk up. The next day all all the leaves that were still on the bush dried up to a crisp, the small branches were spongy and some were brown. I pruned it back a bit more (my husband almost cried) and am continuing to water. Did I kill it? Please tell me I didn't kill it and that it will be okay.

FWIW ~ the only reason I transplanted it in the first place was because it's previous location was near a 50 year old maple tree and was only getting about 2 hours of sum every day. (I'm sure that the tree wasn't that big when the rose bush was planted there by the previous owner of the house.) It hasn't bloomed in a few years and it was starting to get the white powdery stuff from lack of circulation and the buds were falling off. The new location is 6-8 hours of sun and lots more room to grow and spread.
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Old 06-11-2012, 03:51 PM
 
Location: Australia
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STOP WATERING!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Roses do not like being wet.

I live in the driest state in the driest continent on earth, and our roses are world famous as they thrive in the dry heat.

Roses are the toughest plants about, it is very hard to kill them. Just leave it alone for a while and you should see new shoots. Unless you've already drowned the thing of course.
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Old 06-11-2012, 04:29 PM
 
Location: Prospect, KY
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Defintely you have overwatered and I agree it is very difficult to kill them but you may have succeeded.
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Old 06-12-2012, 09:04 AM
 
Location: zone 5
6,400 posts, read 5,545,865 times
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I don't know what source you were using, but all that watering is appropriate for new grass seed and sod, and not much else.
I will say I had a new spirea die not long after I planted it, and I cut it back but didn't dig it out. I did absolutely nothing to it such as water, as I thought it was gone. The following year it surprised me by growing anew. So if you really like it, it's just possible the roots have survived and will regenerate.
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Old 06-12-2012, 11:27 AM
 
2,065 posts, read 3,329,798 times
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Yes everyone has hit the overwatering issue right on the head!

Transplanting a very healthy rose bush at this time of the year is already a risk, especially when hot weather is already occurring. Taking one that is in poor condition (Powdery White Mildew, buds breaking off and little sunlight) adds another risk factor and all the pruning and watering probably were further shocks. I'm not sure what sources you used for the information but it was not a good recipe for success in your case.

Leave the bush alone. No more pruning and fussing. Check the ground every single day at the same time, preferably in the morning. If it feels very wet do not water, if you aren't sure it is damp, or it is dry, water all around the roots for at least 10 minutes using a low setting on your hose. The idea is to provide water to keep to hydrated but not to drown the roots and rot them.The roots should not be constantly soaking wet. Do not add fertilizer or anything else. Keep an eye on it for the next 2 weeks and there should be some new leaf buds begin to show up. If it will make it it will show signs of growth pretty quickly.

Roses are pretty tough and get their fussy image because they are often damaged by bugs and fungus. This may have survived your mistreatment. Don't give up hope yet.

LOL on the spirea! It is one of those tough, live through anything, shrubs.
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Old 06-12-2012, 11:35 AM
 
Location: Prospect, KY
5,269 posts, read 11,713,232 times
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Before doing any more watering I would dig down about 4 or 5 inches very near where you planted the rose and see if there is any soil moisture at that depth. Many people have clay soil and don't realize how long it takes for water to reach the root area of plants. My son just had this problem with his vegetable garden - things were getting watered but not in the correct way for clay soil (slow and long) but the soil was so dense there was no water getting to the root area.
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Old 06-12-2012, 01:29 PM
 
Location: michigan
58 posts, read 81,114 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cattknap View Post
Before doing any more watering I would dig down about 4 or 5 inches very near where you planted the rose and see if there is any soil moisture at that depth. Many people have clay soil and don't realize how long it takes for water to reach the root area of plants. My son just had this problem with his vegetable garden - things were getting watered but not in the correct way for clay soil (slow and long) but the soil was so dense there was no water getting to the root area.
Okay. I dug down about 5 inches and the soil seemed barely damp. I do have a lot of clay in the soil so that may have saved me on the over watering issue. The stems aren't squishy anymore. I'll leave it alone unless I see that the soil is dry and then do a long (10 minute) and slow water around the root area.

As for the sources I found on how to transplant a rose bush, they had tutorials and step by step instructions with pictures and everything. There were even several positive reviews following the instructions. Why, oh, why didn't I just go here in the first place. Lesson learned. I will for sure do that the next time I need some advise.

Keep your fingers crossed for me and my rose. I'll keep you updated. Thanks for the help. I love City-Data.com.
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Old 06-12-2012, 06:19 PM
 
Location: Sherwood
5,184 posts, read 7,573,931 times
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OP, I think you did the right thing and the rose may be OK.

I did the same thing, OP
I actually transplanted three roses at the beginning of the month. These were "freebie" Dr. Hueys the previous owners left in their wake. I think the only mistake you made was transplanting outside of Spring or Early Autumn...in which case, you need (IMO sorry to differ, guys) the extra water.

That's what saves me when I'm bad and transplant things in summer...which I have done more often than is prudent, and I can't remember losing anything. I water in the hole, too...water like heck...and cut off stems.

Roses Survived
My roses shriveled up and looked horrible, but I watered the poo out of them every couple of days to get the roots growing, and now they've remained ugly...but alive...and a couple still have leaves left. Actually ALL the leaves fell off of one, but I am pretty sure it is alive, too. The stem's are still a non-dead shade of green. Hopefully it will put out new leaves after all the rain today.

I Think the Method You used Was Correct
I would say do not let it dry out until you're sure it is not dead.

I think the overwatering is probably a bigger problem for established bushes during non-summer seasons.

After reading the following article, I fell in love w/ my Dr. Hueys...so I'm sharing: My Skinny Garden: Saving Dr. Huey
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Old 06-12-2012, 06:36 PM
 
Location: Australia
4,008 posts, read 2,643,205 times
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As I said I live in the driest state in the driest continent in the world.

I have a rosh that has grown wild in my front yard that has NEVER been watered (we're talking 120 degree days here), has been brutally chopped, hacked at, dug at (it is amongst other bushes) even poisoned. 20 years later the thing is still blooming so I've given up and just accepted I will have a crimson rose in my front yard for ever more.

Local rose growers prune with chainsaws, straight over the top.

That's how hardy they are. Almost weed-like in an exceedingly dry climate.
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Old 06-12-2012, 07:45 PM
 
Location: Prospect, KY
5,269 posts, read 11,713,232 times
Reputation: 6250
Quote:
Originally Posted by MsAnnThrope View Post
As I said I live in the driest state in the driest continent in the world.

I have a rosh that has grown wild in my front yard that has NEVER been watered (we're talking 120 degree days here), has been brutally chopped, hacked at, dug at (it is amongst other bushes) even poisoned. 20 years later the thing is still blooming so I've given up and just accepted I will have a crimson rose in my front yard for ever more.

Local rose growers prune with chainsaws, straight over the top.

That's how hardy they are. Almost weed-like in an exceedingly dry climate.
But you are talking about your established rose with a mature root system - not the OP's newly transplanted rose - completely different circumstance. Roses that have been transplanted should be given water when it is hot - at least for a while - not to be overdone. Transplanting disturbs the roots and for a while the plant does not intake water as efficiently has it did before being transplanted - it takes time for that to happen.

Last edited by Cattknap; 06-12-2012 at 08:03 PM..
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