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Old 07-24-2012, 12:14 PM
 
2,613 posts, read 4,101,590 times
Reputation: 1869

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We are currently in the rocess of building a home in PA (Lehigh Valley).

Our builder needs the dirt from a ~5' hill in order to use as fill for our foundation, but there are about 5 trees there (a few evergreen and a few "regular" trees that people tend to plant in their front/ backyards).

The builder recommended watering the plants, but my questions are how much water and how often? I have no clue about this.

To compound matters, we don't have any water on the land, so I need to take my hose and ask a neighbor to use their water. Hopefully, they will let me.

Thanks!
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Old 07-24-2012, 03:09 PM
 
Location: ๏̯͡๏﴿ Gwinnett-That's a Civil Matter-County
2,117 posts, read 5,090,866 times
Reputation: 3497
I don't understand the question.

Are you saying that your builder is going to remove a hill and you want to transplant the trees that are currently going there?

If so, this is the worst possible time of year to attempt it. Not knowing what species of the trees are and how tolerant they are of being transplanted, it's safe to say there's a significant risk the trees won't survive and if you have no water, fuhgettaboutit.

Maybe I'm not fully understanding the scenario but you would be far better off paying to haul in however much fill dirt your builder needs from somewhere else and leave your hill and trees alone.

Edit:
After reading the title of the tread again, I'm led to believe the trees are already transplanted.
If so, how much water is best judged by sticking fingers a couple of inches into the soil ball and feel if it's moist. If so then it doesn't need to be watered. If not, then you better water it. Tree Gator irrigation bags (or similar) make it convenient if getting water to the trees isn't so easy. A slow, long, deep trickle is ideal.

Last edited by cittic10; 07-24-2012 at 03:18 PM..
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Old 07-24-2012, 07:45 PM
 
Location: Aiken, South Carolina, US of A
1,752 posts, read 3,619,409 times
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Blaze,
COunt them out and don't worry about them.
The evergreens will not make it. Wrong time of year.
The other trees, without a regular water from a hose, well,
just don't worry about them and go buy some pretty evergreens
in the fall. October is ideal for you to plant nice evergreens, and yes
you will have to wait til they grow in, but arborvitae are not expensive
at all for a good 6 foot tree. Just water them also, and Mulch, mulch, mulch.
Check out the green giants also, I love them.
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Old 07-24-2012, 08:44 PM
 
Location: Northeast USA
59 posts, read 208,134 times
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So, there are about 10 trees on the property (they are all under 6' tall). They were on a hill, and the builder wanted to level that area (I agree).

They moved the trees to the other property border (I agree) and then put some dirt on top and expect them to survive with me watering. I have a bad feeling about thus, but I;m not sure how to water. We watered all 10 trees with about 5 gallons each. Is that enough? Frequency?
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Old 07-24-2012, 11:17 PM
 
2,063 posts, read 6,239,867 times
Reputation: 2712
Quote:
Originally Posted by newhousebuilt View Post
So, there are about 10 trees on the property (they are all under 6' tall). They were on a hill, and the builder wanted to level that area (I agree).

They moved the trees to the other property border (I agree) and then put some dirt on top and expect them to survive with me watering. I have a bad feeling about thus, but I;m not sure how to water. We watered all 10 trees with about 5 gallons each. Is that enough? Frequency?
The chances of this working are exceedingly slim unless the trees were dug out with exceptional care, and they get deep watering every few days consistently. This is probably the worst time of year to even attempt to transplant most trees. Without the ability to soak the roots adequately you cannot keep enough moisture flowing into the damaged root system, especially in this hotter and drier than normal summer. Soaking is running the water from a hose for a period of 15 -20 minutes at a slow flow, sometimes longer depending on soil conditions. It will need to be done every other day, more than likely, unless it has rained a good long soaking rain. Short and light rains tend to run off and not get down deep enough.

Placing "dirt on top" sounds like they also put soil up on the portion of the trunk that will rot if buried. Tree height is not always a good measure of age but it sounds like they were not much past a sapling state so buying new trees in the early fall won't put you far behind whatever you would have gotten from the existing trees.
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Old 07-25-2012, 10:05 AM
 
2,613 posts, read 4,101,590 times
Reputation: 1869
Quote:
Originally Posted by Butterfly4u View Post
Blaze,
COunt them out and don't worry about them.
The evergreens will not make it. Wrong time of year.
The other trees, without a regular water from a hose, well,
just don't worry about them and go buy some pretty evergreens
in the fall. October is ideal for you to plant nice evergreens, and yes
you will have to wait til they grow in, but arborvitae are not expensive
at all for a good 6 foot tree. Just water them also, and Mulch, mulch, mulch.
Check out the green giants also, I love them.
You are all giving me bad news.

The builder leveled one moved the trees yesterday morning. He put them into a dirt mound as a holding spot.

Anyway, the wife and I went there yesterday around 7PM. The dirt was pretty dry, so we put ~5 gallons of water on each tree (had a 5 gallon bucket). My new plan is to connect my hose to the neighbor's hose and hopefully with my nozzle, I can make it rain on the trees.

It's the only chance we have.

Should we put some miracle grow in the trees?
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Old 07-25-2012, 10:23 AM
 
Location: Las Flores, Orange County, CA
26,346 posts, read 80,739,113 times
Reputation: 17410
What would happen to the tree if you transplanted it across the equator? It would be six months out of phase, What would happen? If you transplanted from the US in September to Chili it would be starting it's dormant phase in a new location that was moving into spring.

What would happen?
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Old 07-25-2012, 10:54 AM
 
Location: ๏̯͡๏﴿ Gwinnett-That's a Civil Matter-County
2,117 posts, read 5,090,866 times
Reputation: 3497
Quote:
Originally Posted by blazerj View Post
hopefully with my nozzle, I can make it rain on the trees.
)))

+++
Don't make it rain on the trees. Make it rain on the soil ball/ root zone.

(((
Quote:
Originally Posted by blazerj View Post
Should we put some miracle grow in the trees?
))

NO!!!!

Never, ever use miracle gro on trees.
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Old 07-25-2012, 08:21 PM
 
2,613 posts, read 4,101,590 times
Reputation: 1869
Cittic,

My wife was not happy with me, but I think it worked in the end. She got to the site aout an hour before me and tried to cover the bit of exposed roots around. My hose trick was not long enough, so I bought another 100' hose and connector and finally we were able to get right up to the plants and water them. There are 12 plants and we put about 2-3 minutes of water on each. Hopefully they are fine, but IDK.
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Old 05-14-2013, 12:01 PM
 
2,613 posts, read 4,101,590 times
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Hey all, just an update. They put the trees into a burm and they lasted all winter!

For the past ~3 weeks they have been sitting kind of exposed (see the pics below), but should be permanently replanted today. Since they have been "abused", what's the best thing I can do for them once they are in the ground?

I was told to put organic peat moss around where the roots would be and heavily water the plants for a few days.

Is that a good idea? Is there anything else that I can do to make sure these trees thrive? Thanks!



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