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Old 09-10-2012, 08:15 PM
 
Location: Little Rock AR USA
2,457 posts, read 6,090,111 times
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Our mimosa are blooming again now that we finally got rain here in central AR.
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Old 09-11-2012, 07:40 AM
 
Location: ๏̯͡๏﴿ Gwinnett-That's a Civil Matter-County
2,117 posts, read 5,093,264 times
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Now would be a good time to cut it down and apply stump killer to the trunk.

Sometimes we have to put out planet first and forgo the ornamental features of a plant that is currently demonstrating the potential to be an invasive species in your state.

But I'm glad to hear you're getting some rain. That will come in handy should you hopefully decide to replace your mimosa with something that is better behaved and won't escape cultivation.
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Old 09-11-2012, 10:37 AM
 
Location: Aiken, South Carolina, US of A
1,752 posts, read 3,622,157 times
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I am glad your mimosa is blooming again.
It's so nice to finally get rain, isn't it?
Everything is so nice and green and lush.
We have been in a bad drought and we finally got some
rain that we needed real bad. I feel sorry for the farmers
in this area, and there are many.
I just hope we continue to get more needed rain through out
the fall.
I love mimosa trees, we had one growing in our yard when
I was growing up. They have a special place in my heart.
Someday in the future, sometime in the future, the scientists
are going to discover that mimosa trees hold the cure for a disease.
You wait and see.
There is a terrible disease now killing many mimosa trees through
out the country. I hope your tree doesn't get it and gives you many more
years of enjoyment.
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Old 09-11-2012, 11:44 AM
 
2,063 posts, read 6,242,715 times
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ArkansasSlim I'm glad you finally have had some much needed rain but sure wish it was something else you were rejoicing at being revived. Mimosa are easily one of the more problematic trees out there. Anyone who cares about wildlife habitat will hate it and others keep saying "...but it's so pretty it can't be harmful" or similar comments.

There are tons of pro and con articles out there and people have argued about it here on City Data as well. A fairly well balanced articles that cover much of what I would say can be found here: Mimosa Tree - Treasure or Trash ? and Randy Lemmon The wilt factor has not slowed down the gradual take over in the wild spots around here and I cringe when people say they want to plant one. Personally, I'd want it gone despite fond memories of the first one I ever saw as a child.

Butterfly4u how I wish you were right but that would still leave all the other invasives that people don't realize are a problem.
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Old 09-11-2012, 01:06 PM
 
Location: Little Rock AR USA
2,457 posts, read 6,090,111 times
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I understand the negative posts about the Mimosa. I do archeology work on the Ouachita National Forest in the Ouachita Mountains and find it in many places way out in the boonies, and also privet hedge.

Ours is a volunteer which we let grow because we do not cut anything green, even the pain in the privet which we do keep under control. But I am aware they both will spread all over the country side.
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Old 09-14-2012, 08:10 AM
 
3,751 posts, read 10,206,509 times
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Our mimosa has been in bloom all summer. We love it. They are fast growers, and don't live all that long (like many fast growing trees), so we will enjoy it while its here, and likely will not replace it with another mimosa when its gone.

We are however tearing out all the invasive honeysuckle on the other hand. So, we are at least making an effort to stop invasives on that issue.

Glad you've finally gotten some rain. We were pretty dry this summer as well, but not as bad as some other areas.
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Old 09-15-2012, 12:39 PM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,434 posts, read 41,632,813 times
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The rain is great and yes the mimosa blooms some would call pretty but mimosa blooms only mean mimosa seeds and that means more trash trees to invade our country and keep the more desirable species from growing. How I wish we could get the message across about these horribly destructive trees.

Not everything pretty is a good thing.

If some could see first hand how out of control these trash trees are and the damage they do, I think they would change their minds. In the meantime, please do a little reading on the subject.
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Old 09-16-2012, 09:03 AM
 
Location: ๏̯͡๏﴿ Gwinnett-That's a Civil Matter-County
2,117 posts, read 5,093,264 times
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Never mind the reading. Find out where they are doing the damage and get out there and LOOK AT IT for yourself.
You'll see first hand what all these trees are doing because people want pretty flowers for a week or 2 out of the year.

There are many attractive alternatives if all you want are flowers. Shrubs do a much better job at flowers anyway than do large trees.
If you have Mimosa, the quicker you remove it and replace it with something else, the quicker you'll have a really desirable tree there that is not causing any problems and will be longer lived.
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Old 09-16-2012, 07:51 PM
 
Location: Dallas, Texas
8,856 posts, read 10,315,940 times
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Do they still sell mimosas in nurseries?? That was a big thing here in my area back in the 50s, 60s, and 70s. I don't see them that often anymore. I do remember growing up our neighbor had one and it made a huge mess once or twice a year. I did some reading on them years ago, not a fan. They are very destructive.
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Old 09-16-2012, 09:57 PM
 
Location: ๏̯͡๏﴿ Gwinnett-That's a Civil Matter-County
2,117 posts, read 5,093,264 times
Reputation: 3497
Quote:
Originally Posted by TXNGL View Post
Do they still sell mimosas in nurseries?? That was a big thing here in my area back in the 50s, 60s, and 70s. I don't see them that often anymore. I do remember growing up our neighbor had one and it made a huge mess once or twice a year. I did some reading on them years ago, not a fan. They are very destructive.
Not so much anymore but unfortunately some unscrupulous nurseries propagate them and some others get in a popular cultivar called "Summer Chocolate". They don't care about the environment all they care about is money.
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