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Old 12-08-2012, 07:50 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh area
9,918 posts, read 20,031,622 times
Reputation: 5079

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Hey, that's why they still sell all kinds I guess.

I'm generally willing to pay a little more for something that is executed in a better way vs merely adequate. Of course, I haven't tried a modern cheap mower so I don't know how I would find it. When I set out to buy a mower, I pretty much figured I wanted it to be propelled to get up the hill on this 1/3 acre lot. Given that I wanted that, and that I like to be able to mulch or bag, and so on, I felt like I was picking a model that was going to perform all these better than a lesser brand would have. But I don't know this from an absolute side-by-side trial. I do know it to be true with a number of other types of products over the years.

In other words, there could be significant differences in performance other than just longevity and reliability. Sometimes a cheap mower can't even cut evenly or disperse clippings well or whatever. It's just another factor to consider in making your choice. There are certainly good applications for a cheap mower. I think the idea that more people are going to wreck them somehow than not is a little overblown. If that is the case, how do people manage to keep cars for even a few years? I doubt too many people with a mower don't have a car. And with a car, we're talking thousands or tens of thousands of dollars, not the couple hundred bucks difference in mowers.
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Old 12-22-2012, 05:04 AM
 
Location: Port St Lucie Florida
1,264 posts, read 2,947,242 times
Reputation: 378
Default Honda black max mower repair

I have a Honda Powered Black Max Front Wheel drive mower and the front wheels barely move and will not propel the mower. What could be the problem and how do i repair it please.
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Old 01-01-2013, 12:36 PM
 
Location: HoCo, MD
4,065 posts, read 7,723,995 times
Reputation: 4357
Quote:
Originally Posted by alsidw View Post
I have a Honda Powered Black Max Front Wheel drive mower and the front wheels barely move and will not propel the mower. What could be the problem and how do i repair it please.
Probably the notches on the wheels have worn out. In essence (and pardon the incorrect terminology), when you engage the bar to drive the wheels, the axle basically engages the wheels via these notches. Over time, the notches wear down to the point where there's nothing to grab onto to turn the wheels.

I have a craftsman that I need to replace the wheels every few seasons. I usually just get replacement wheels from Amazon for like $15.

What you can do is just remove one of the wheels and verify. The inside surface of the wheel should have a ring of notches (basically looks like gear notches). It should be fairly easy to tell if they've been worn.
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Old 01-01-2013, 06:38 PM
 
Location: Port St Lucie Florida
1,264 posts, read 2,947,242 times
Reputation: 378
Yep the drive wheels were shot.
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Old Yesterday, 02:52 AM
 
14 posts, read 1,408 times
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I have browsed around many places and found so many robotic lawn mowers there. Some are expensive and some are not that good. According to my experience, you can go for Husqvarna Automower 315X. This model includes many extra features which make it popular. Some important features are low energy consumption, no emission, excellent cutting result, weather-proof, automatic charging, easy height adjustment, silent, spot, unique cutting system.
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Old Yesterday, 06:30 AM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
13,933 posts, read 11,065,619 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamerican View Post
Thanks all ... appreciate the tips.
The one thing you did not tell us is how much lawn you will be cutting? If it is a small lawn I would agree with MrRational; go cheap. Just keep oil in the crankcase and you should be fine; providing you don't hit rocks or roots. I used to sell mowers and I had more problems with the expensive ones than the cheap ones. Of course that was good for my repair business.

If you have a large lawn we might give you other advice; such as a rider.
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Old Yesterday, 12:13 PM
 
Location: Scottdale, Ga
66 posts, read 24,397 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fisheye View Post
The one thing you did not tell us is how much lawn you will be cutting? If it is a small lawn I would agree with MrRational; go cheap. Just keep oil in the crankcase and you should be fine; providing you don't hit rocks or roots. I used to sell mowers and I had more problems with the expensive ones than the cheap ones. Of course that was good for my repair business.

If you have a large lawn we might give you other advice; such as a rider.
He asked the question 6 years ago. I hope he has an answer by now.
I'm in the market for a new mower and I'll be going cheap.
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Old Yesterday, 03:57 PM
 
12,091 posts, read 16,136,581 times
Reputation: 23300
If the OP is still around, whether the new mower is a cheap one or an expensive one, if it has a gasoline engine (2-cycle or a 4-cycle), when sitting it up for the winter, make sure the last tank of gas of the season has a good fuel stabilizer additive in it. This new gasoline will clog up a mower carburetor sitting in storage over the span of just a winter.

Additionally, ethanol in modern gasoline can do damage to some of the gaskets in the carburetor of small engines and it can make for very difficult starting in engines with a little age. At the end of the mowing season, you may think that running the mower until the engine stops is sufficient to get rid of the gas but the bowl of the carburetor will normally still have gasoline in it even after the engine stops.

I won't recommend a brand or model of a lawn mower since I have to mow my "lawn" here with a large Craftsman garden tractor or sometimes even a small Ford farm tractor. I'm probably out of touch with mower manufactures and their quality.
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Old Yesterday, 06:37 PM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
13,933 posts, read 11,065,619 times
Reputation: 10283
Quote:
Originally Posted by High_Plains_Retired View Post
If the OP is still around, whether the new mower is a cheap one or an expensive one, if it has a gasoline engine (2-cycle or a 4-cycle), when sitting it up for the winter, make sure the last tank of gas of the season has a good fuel stabilizer additive in it. This new gasoline will clog up a mower carburetor sitting in storage over the span of just a winter.

Additionally, ethanol in modern gasoline can do damage to some of the gaskets in the carburetor of small engines and it can make for very difficult starting in engines with a little age. At the end of the mowing season, you may think that running the mower until the engine stops is sufficient to get rid of the gas but the bowl of the carburetor will normally still have gasoline in it even after the engine stops.

I won't recommend a brand or model of a lawn mower since I have to mow my "lawn" here with a large Craftsman garden tractor or sometimes even a small Ford farm tractor. I'm probably out of touch with mower manufactures and their quality.
You don't have to use the fuel stabilizer if you leave your equipment with a full tank of fuel and you use it every season. The very worse thing one can do is leave equipment sit with just a small amount of fuel that then evaporates and leaves gum behind. Full tanks do not leave the same amount space for the fuel to evaporate and, with more fuel, any evaporation does not produce that clogging gum. It is possible that, people that live in very hot areas of our Country, might have more problems with evaporation and thus would be better off with the additives?

Of course, if the equipment will set for years; then use the additives or remove the fuel. Gas generators are a prime example since you might go for several years before the next use. Some generators are also hard for homeowners to remove the fuel line and drain the tank. After the tank is drained you still need to run the equipment until it stops to make sure all fuel is out the system. The little amount of fuel left in any carburetor bowl could be removed by removing the bowl; but is usually not necessary. So many homeowners might find the additives considerably easier. I would still try to keep those 'stabilized' tanks full of fuel.

Ethanol is another problem. In my mind it is not worth buying the more expensive lead fuel. Unless you still have a gas station where you can fill your five gallon containers. You look at the price of the small 32 oz. containers sold at Lowe's and other stores and one could quickly spend more on the fuel that they would save from maintenance.
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Old Yesterday, 06:57 PM
 
12,091 posts, read 16,136,581 times
Reputation: 23300
Quote:
Originally Posted by fisheye View Post
You don't have to use the fuel stabilizer if you leave your equipment with a full tank of fuel and you use it every season. The very worse thing one can do is leave equipment sit with just a small amount of fuel that then evaporates and leaves gum behind. Full tanks do not leave the same amount space for the fuel to evaporate and, with more fuel, any evaporation does not produce that clogging gum. It is possible that, people that live in very hot areas of our Country, might have more problems with evaporation and thus would be better off with the additives?

Of course, if the equipment will set for years; then use the additives or remove the fuel. Gas generators are a prime example since you might go for several years before the next use. Some generators are also hard for homeowners to remove the fuel line and drain the tank. After the tank is drained you still need to run the equipment until it stops to make sure all fuel is out the system. The little amount of fuel left in any carburetor bowl could be removed by removing the bowl; but is usually not necessary. So many homeowners might find the additives considerably easier. I would still try to keep those 'stabilized' tanks full of fuel.

Ethanol is another problem. In my mind it is not worth buying the more expensive lead fuel. Unless you still have a gas station where you can fill your five gallon containers. You look at the price of the small 32 oz. containers sold at Lowe's and other stores and one could quickly spend more on the fuel that they would save from maintenance.
All good advice. Thanks!
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