U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
 
Old 03-03-2013, 04:11 AM
 
Location: Hong Kong
1,329 posts, read 822,256 times
Reputation: 217

Advertisements

"Gardening is the New Golf" - I have heard some New Urbanists say
=====================

Some think that the Suburbs will be the heartland of a revival-
Using permaculture - see this VIDEO:

David Holmgren-Retrofitting the Suburbs
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2cjhQWdbqE4

If the Suburbs are a saving grace, it will be because of the Gardens and growing space there,
not because of their car-dependency.

To put it another way, the Gardens will be so important, that the Suburbs
will survive and thrive, in spite of the inefficient transport system



It is possible, My own view is that even the Garden vision of the Suburban's future will require substantial retrofitting, such as turning Golf courses into farms
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-03-2013, 07:20 AM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
28,382 posts, read 50,562,503 times
Reputation: 28605
We are in a suburb with decent size lots (1/3 acre) and I can tell you that at least a dozen people withing a few blocks have raised beds in the front yard where they grow vegetables,
and several like me that have a greenhouse on what used to be lawn. Our problem is the tall fir trees blocking the sun in the back yards so the lawn gets the most sun. I don'[t know about "the new golf" though, our golf courses are still doing just fine, even the high schools have teams.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-03-2013, 07:28 AM
 
Location: california
5,470 posts, read 4,552,683 times
Reputation: 6402
It is good to see that more people are taking aninterest in gardening and thinking of the future . WOW
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-03-2013, 09:12 AM
 
Location: Hong Kong
1,329 posts, read 822,256 times
Reputation: 217
This subject came up elsewhere

Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I recall that last summer, I posted about seeing sunflowers peeking over the fences in Denver, indicating even the urbanites were gardening. Of course, some urbanite shot down my observation. But yeah, even people in apartments often grow a few tomato plants in containers.
. . .
There is no shortage of farmland in the US. There is no need to turn golf courses into cornfields, and no, I do not golf.
I reckon that will come (golf courses into farmland) within a few years, when the Dollar Crashes, and oil prices soar. And we return to a more local economy - see JH Kunstler The Long Emergency begin to emerge.


James H Kuntsler TEDTalk - YouTube

"Please stop referring to yourselves as Consumers...
We need to be useful again to our neighbors."

So true. And one way to do that is to grow food. Nice healthy food that you can swap with the goods and products that your neighbors also produce.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-03-2013, 02:47 PM
 
Location: Land of Free Johnson-Weld-2016
6,474 posts, read 13,403,963 times
Reputation: 6404
I live in an area with a lot of corn and soybean farms. IMO they're not really environmentally friendly. In my area, farmers use a ton of herbicide between seasons. I never actually see a person in any of the fields, either.

They're not like small farms I'm used to or the fantasy of a farm at all. It is especially disturbing after the crop's cut, and the fields magically turn brown. I had no idea before I moved here, so I'm glad I didn't end up living right next to a field. I'd be annoyed. But this is why food's so affordable, I guess.

Corn's one thing I make an extra-special effort to eat organic. Food production causes a lot of runoff and is a big problem in my state, and probably others. I'd rather see the golf courses partially forested, or planted in a way to prevent chemicals from running off the grass into waterways than used to grow corn.

As long as people don't dig up their entire yards to grow veggies, I think it is an awesome trend. Perennials and shrubs prevent runoff and filter groundwater, and shouldn't be 100% removed, IMO. Decent chemical-free food is expensive. I love that gardeners always share their produce, too. I wonder if it will depress the price of food?
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-03-2013, 09:11 PM
 
Location: Hong Kong
1,329 posts, read 822,256 times
Reputation: 217
Quote:
Originally Posted by kinkytoes View Post
I live in an area with a lot of corn and soybean farms. IMO they're not really environmentally friendly. In my area, farmers use a ton of herbicide between seasons. I never actually see a person in any of the fields, either.

They're not like small farms I'm used to or the fantasy of a farm at all...

As long as people don't dig up their entire yards to grow veggies, I think it is an awesome trend. Perennials and shrubs prevent runoff and filter groundwater, and shouldn't be 100% removed, IMO. Decent chemical-free food is expensive. I love that gardeners always share their produce, too. I wonder if it will depress the price of food?
KT,
I agree with your description.
The sad thing is that almost of us are now fed by farms like that.

I would like to see lawns, at least most of the back lawns replaced by garden plots. To me, that is more pleasing to look at anyway - I can see a balance with nature. Manicured green lawns seem so artificial.
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:
Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top