U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-18-2013, 08:39 AM
 
3,339 posts, read 6,248,066 times
Reputation: 4172

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
Works in my garden, and has for 35 years. Worked in my grandfather's garden before that; he kept a garden for 60 years.

Maybe we're just special.


If this thread vexes you so, by all means feel free to stay away.

Misinformation vexes me, and I always try to correct it, so you won't get rid of me that easily. If you and your family have had great results with your vegetable garden and you have also been planting marigolds around it, then you are doing something else right. It isn't the marigolds. Take it from Iowa State Extension:

"Can I keep rabbits out of my vegetable garden by planting marigolds around the perimeter?
Marigolds do not repel rabbits, deer or other animals. In fact, rabbits occasionally browse heavily on marigolds. Erecting a chicken wire or hardware cloth fence around the vegetable garden is the best way to keep rabbits out of the garden. "

And here is the link:

Yard and Garden: Marigolds | Iowa State University Extension and Outreach

You may do whatever you wish, but when you post unscientific and unproven information about your practices, other people might buy into it. That's why I don't leave this thread.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-18-2013, 08:42 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
29,607 posts, read 50,971,430 times
Reputation: 48327
Quote:
Originally Posted by TinaMcG View Post
"Can I keep rabbits out of my vegetable garden by planting marigolds around the perimeter?
Reading is fundamental. My post was about hornworms, not rabbits.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-18-2013, 08:46 AM
 
Location: In the realm of possiblities
2,652 posts, read 1,862,515 times
Reputation: 3200
We had tomato hornworms real bad, and I got tired of looking for them, and throwing them to the chickens, so in asking around, someone mentioned what they do. Take a few fresh jalapeno peppers, and slice them in half, then simmer them in a pot of water. Say a quart. when the water starts turning a greenish color, discard the peppers, let the water cool, then pour the brew in a sprayer, and spray the tomato plants. It worked real good for us, and was good for other plants as well. Kept the bugs away. I would suggest if anyone wants to do this, wear latex gloves, and turn the vent fan on while this is simmering. The fumes are bad. Also, as far as I was told, Marigolds, when planted in close proximity to tomatos, have in their roots a chemical that discourages nematode development on the tomato roots. We always had them in the garden, even though they didn't smell that great, they added color.
I try a lot of things when I garden, and if it works for me, then I continue, if not,then discontinue. One person might find something works for them in their situation, with their methods of gardening, their particular climate, and with their soil composition, but another person has no luck with it because their situation is totally different. To me, it doesn't matter what works best or not, I will discover the right combination eventually. Gardening has,and always will be a trial, and error endeavor, and a learning experience as well. Bottom line is, I love to garden, and if I can put my hands in the dirt, I am happy.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-18-2013, 09:01 AM
 
Location: Went around the corner & now I'm lost!!!!
1,531 posts, read 2,661,854 times
Reputation: 1164
Quote:
Originally Posted by TinaMcG View Post
You can knock it if it doesn't make sense from a scientific standpoint, and sticking matches in the soil makes no sense whatsoever. I have a whole book of these garden tips someone gave me as a gift when I was a new gardener. An awful lot of them are complete nonsense.

Extension services will always tell you to water in the morning, avoid evening watering if possible. Evvening moisture plus darkness promotes the growth of fungi and mold, and yes, it could provide more harbor for insects.

I suggest if you are a rookie, you start off on a good footing and visit your local county Extension service, or find out which Extension serves your area and browse their website for research-based articles. If there are any infallible hort services out there, it's the Extension services.
I can see how that bit of sulfur can benefit a new seedling by preventing the growth of mold and fungi that would attack the youthful plant. I use sulfur, wood ash, corn gluten, garlic, soap & red pepper blend, nematodes and other benefical insects in my backyard for four years now. I rarely if ever buy commmercial products. The front yard get the same but have more weeds due it exposure to wind and unkept neighboring yards and land. I hadn't put down the corn gluten this past two Fall or Spring seasons just so I can see the difference. I don't mind this because the weeds I pull up and feed to my chickens...free food source for them.

TM you have to understand everything will not be from a scientific standpoint because science has not advanced enough to understand. For example, 30 years ago in the medical field they told us the nervous system was incapable of regenerating itself. Didn't make sense to me that ONE system was unable to heal itself but ALL others could. Science has recently discovered it can and a surge of neuroregenerative science had increased across the globe. Also science says that insects are unable to fly but we all know they do. Light (laser) can heal the body by just surface exposure or used in the eye to treat a neurological problems. This wasn't discovered by science until recently. Nature is more advanced than Science; it is in it's infancy.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-18-2013, 09:13 AM
 
Location: Went around the corner & now I'm lost!!!!
1,531 posts, read 2,661,854 times
Reputation: 1164
Quote:
Originally Posted by TinaMcG View Post
Heck of a post, Em, thanks! I hadn't even thought of the things that might be in that pee. Medication is the first thing that comes to mind. Pregnant women? You're talking hormones. Many other people, you're looking at anti-depressants, pain meds and antibiotics. No thanks. I'll take my "chances" with granular fertilizer.
Using urine from a medicated person would be a major problem because the plant would absorb it. I forget about this because I don't take ANY meds and use only herbs for my healing because they provide both medicinal and nutritional properties to my body and I am in my mid 50s; started herbs over 20 years ago. I also fast, detox and genetics plays a role also.

I agree let your pet do all the work for FREE. I bury my dog's poop around my plants; never throw it away.Do not wild animals poop in the forest; hadn't seen a dead tree from it yet, have you? Now if you were in survivalistic situation and you had to get rid of your urine and BM discreetly then I would go with composting it in a far off distant pile.

Last edited by eyewrist; 03-18-2013 at 10:25 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-18-2013, 09:28 AM
 
25,632 posts, read 25,581,864 times
Reputation: 22888
Well at least this thread hasn't hit Godwin's Law yet but it's gittin' there.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-18-2013, 09:55 AM
 
Location: Kalamalka Lake, B.C.
2,325 posts, read 3,093,755 times
Reputation: 2823
I plant late. My uncle has kept gardening records for forty years and planting early rarely helps, makes a lot more work, and by August everything is the same size no matter when planted.

I put my hand on the ground and when it's warm I plant. Usually May 1st. or later on the west coast and much, much later on the prairies.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-18-2013, 09:55 AM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
35,884 posts, read 35,825,079 times
Reputation: 45276
I'll bite. Hitler used to pee on his plants and they were beautiful! How's that?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-18-2013, 10:00 AM
 
4,079 posts, read 7,480,773 times
Reputation: 2876
Here you go Bulldogdad, "Homes and gardens" did an article in 1938:

'Hitler's Mountain Home' from Homes and Gardens November 1938 - p 193 | Special reports | guardian.co.uk
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-18-2013, 10:24 AM
 
2,063 posts, read 5,566,367 times
Reputation: 2663
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bulldogdad View Post
Well at least this thread hasn't hit Godwin's Law yet but it's gittin' there.

Best line ever and I couldn't rep you yet, drats!! Yeah, its getting there, any moment now.

I think everyone should use everyone of those old fashioned tricks and hints, just be kind enough to tell the people you hand any food items to that they've been grown with the aid of human poop and pee. In this day and age of people taking multiple showers per day and removing every vestige of hair from their bodies to be more "clean" that should go over really well. The extremes in our society can be amazing.

Tina, thank you. Don't get too frustrated, sometimes people don't want to incorporate what we can teach them from the researched sciences and prefer a little voodoo. In the end it is their garden and their plants to handle and eat, so if voodoo makes them happy, so be it. Now if someone would stop that rain dance I'd be happy. It's going to be a muddy spring of planting if we don't get a break soon.

StarryEyedSurprise congratulations and best wishes for you and the baby!

Hotzcatz the epsom salts are a great additive and a better source for sulphur than the matchsticks ever can be. I use it to and it has been researched enough that I feel it makes a great addition to the tricks that we can use. Bunny tea and well composted bunny poop are great for gardens as well.

Eyewrist wrote:
Quote:
TM you have to understand everything will not be from a scientific standpoint because science has not advanced enough to understand. For example, 30 years ago in the medical field they told us the nervous system was incapable of regenerating itself. Didn't make sense to me that ONE system was unable to heal itself but ALL others could. Science has recently discovered it can and a surge of neuroregenerative science had increased across the globe. Also science says that insects are unable to fly but we all know they do. Light (laser) can heal the body by just surface exposure or used in the eye to treat a neurological problems. This wasn't discovered by science until recently. Nature is more advanced than Science; it is in it's infancy.
You are right in so far that science does not have all the answers to everything and it never will because we will always find new things to learn about the world. Just as our concept of gravity doesn't change, just some of the special cases of how it works, chemical sciences for gardening doesn't really change, just small tweaks in how to change timing or amounts. We can try to explain some of the old tricks and why/why not they work but people will stubbornly cling to beliefs even when shown a "benefit" is not achieved from the additive/process they used.

While I think I understand what you are trying to say, your example is, however, not as applicable even if it appears so on its face. All too often what the media reports as science is misleading and compounds the problems people have in understanding why science based knowledge will always trump anecdotal evidence. What was known 50 years ago was that any healing the nervous system did do was so slow and inconsequential as to be nonexistent in a person's life time. I don't want to get hyper technical so I will summarize in broad terms. With increasing ability to detect very minute amounts of chemical changes (on a microscopic level), and the genetics to understand what guides the chemical changes, scientists have discovered ways to make that growth go faster and in bigger amounts. Research showed some nerves do this more quickly than others and science has been looking at those more and more closely in order to find ways to magnify this changes to make them medically useful. Along with changes in what I will term physical therapy, chemistry and even microsurgery we have been able to reattach limbs and have new connections gradually made. It doesn't mean that what was originally was known about the nerves and how they regenerate connections was wrong, we just didn't have the tools to harness what was there.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $99,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2017, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32 - Top