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Old 03-18-2013, 09:29 PM
Status: "be kind." (set 24 days ago)
 
2,679 posts, read 3,881,352 times
Reputation: 6226

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I absolutely believe in the 'egg shells' added to the pot with tomato plants. I tried to grow tomatoes for years and most of my tomatoes would rot until I started adding egg shells!

Here in NC we know all about slugs and beer. Works everytime!
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Old 03-18-2013, 09:30 PM
 
Location: West Lafayette
67 posts, read 192,305 times
Reputation: 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jude1948 View Post
That is weird so I will try it. Tomatoes were lousy in Atlanta last year. Anything to help
Get some ammonium sulfate from the garden center and try it (randomly) on some other (untreated) plants if you want to experiment a little in the sulfur realm.
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Old 03-18-2013, 09:32 PM
 
Location: West Lafayette
67 posts, read 192,305 times
Reputation: 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by Charlotteborn View Post
I absolutely believe in the 'egg shells' added to the pot with tomato plants. I tried to grow tomatoes for years and most of my tomatoes would rot until I started adding egg shells!
!
Somethin' like this happening? The bottom parts of the fruit? Calcium deficiency (plant disorder) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 03-19-2013, 06:42 AM
 
Location: Maine
2,349 posts, read 1,581,196 times
Reputation: 4200
Quote:
Originally Posted by TinaMcG View Post
I'm out now. I've said what I need to say, and if you all want to believe that dancing in the moonlight will keep vampires away from your veggie gardens, have at it. When it gets to the point where even SCIENCE is being doubted because we may know more in the future, then I know I am wasting my time.

There is scientific research behind everything I post. These are controlled and closely monitored university studies that are ultimately paid for by private donations and tax dollars. And the information is free to anyone who wants it. That's what Extension is all about. You want to dispute the findings of researchers at Ohio State, Illinois State, Iowa State, Penn State, Clemson, Kansas State, U of Minnesota, U of Missouri, UC Davis and others, go right ahead. I am an Extension Master Gardener, not a witch doctor.
Scientific research from private donors like Monsanto, Exxon-Mobile, Cargill...etc. What could possibly go wrong with that

Monsanto executive: Hello Dr Jones, how is the study on our newest chemical fertilizer going?

Scientist Dr. Jones: Well not so good, it makes the plants grow very well but our test rats seamed to be growing extra limbs on there backs.

Monsanto executive: That's unfortunate Dr. Jones, I guess we will just have to cancel your research grant, Oh by the way are you still planning to send your kids to college next year?

Scientist Dr. Jones: Ah well actually those rats will probably be just fine, In fact we will just eliminate them from our study altogether, Your new fertilizer will be ready for market very soon.

Monsanto executive: That's great Dr. Jones, and I just happen to have another grant check here in my briefcase for you.



Bill
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Old 03-19-2013, 07:04 AM
 
3,339 posts, read 7,177,937 times
Reputation: 4221
Quote:
Originally Posted by roadrat View Post
Scientific research from private donors like Monsanto, Exxon-Mobile, Cargill...etc. What could possibly go wrong with that

Monsanto executive: Hello Dr Jones, how is the study on our newest chemical fertilizer going?

Scientist Dr. Jones: Well not so good, it makes the plants grow very well but our test rats seamed to be growing extra limbs on there backs.

Monsanto executive: That's unfortunate Dr. Jones, I guess we will just have to cancel your research grant, Oh by the way are you still planning to send your kids to college next year?

Scientist Dr. Jones: Ah well actually those rats will probably be just fine, In fact we will just eliminate them from our study altogether, Your new fertilizer will be ready for market very soon.

Monsanto executive: That's great Dr. Jones, and I just happen to have another grant check here in my briefcase for you.



Bill
OKay, I'm back in. Did you even read what I wrote? Do you even believe in scientific research? I was talking about independent university research. Those people are beholding to NO ONE and those studies are funded by tax dollars and other support that goes into the land-grant universities. They are STATE universities, not private institutions, and they are most definitely not aligned with corporations of any kind.

Land-grant universities were eestablished during the Lincoln administration. Simply put, the states receive grants to build uiniversities, and in return, those universities establish "extension" programs which take knowledge and researched-based information out to the public. That is what EXTENSION is all about. The most famous Extension program is 4-H. So is the Master Gardener program.

If our Master Gardener coordinator ever heard me tel;ling someone to put matches under plants at planting time, I would be out of the program.
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Old 03-19-2013, 08:12 AM
 
Location: Went around the corner & now I'm lost!!!!
1,550 posts, read 2,958,784 times
Reputation: 1217
Quote:
Originally Posted by TinaMcG View Post
If you plant a matchstick at the bottom of a pot, under the soil, it isn't going to anything. It won't acidify the soil and it can't possibly inhibit mold or mildew. In fact, a seedling's roots will be nowhere near the matchstick, and whatever is in the match won't migrate upwards so much as it will sideways and down.

And since when did science say insects cannot fly?
The OP never says where they place them, how many or what type but if I were to do so I would have placed it right under the seedling. I have planted seeds only to find a fungus had over taken them so a pinch of sulfur under them would have been benefical. And yes when I was a teen, which was many moons ago, science was confused that insect could fly when by scientific theory they were not supposedly able to do so. Now they understand this. This how quickly theories can change or become obsolete.
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Old 03-19-2013, 08:24 AM
 
Location: Maine
2,349 posts, read 1,581,196 times
Reputation: 4200
Quote:
Originally Posted by TinaMcG View Post
OKay, I'm back in. Did you even read what I wrote? Do you even believe in scientific research? I was talking about independent university research. Those people are beholding to NO ONE and those studies are funded by tax dollars and other support that goes into the land-grant universities. They are STATE universities, not private institutions, and they are most definitely not aligned with corporations of any kind.

Land-grant universities were eestablished during the Lincoln administration. Simply put, the states receive grants to build uiniversities, and in return, those universities establish "extension" programs which take knowledge and researched-based information out to the public. That is what EXTENSION is all about. The most famous Extension program is 4-H. So is the Master Gardener program.

If our Master Gardener coordinator ever heard me tel;ling someone to put matches under plants at planting time, I would be out of the program.
Ooh that's so cute, your one of those people that thinks that your little part of the world has not been corrupted by power hungry Government and there slave master corporate bosses.
Just let one of your precious "beholden to no one" universities get out of line for one minute and see how fast the doors and windows are boarded up.

By the way scientist do not always get it right.
Residues of Picloram, Clopyralid or Aminopyralid Herbicide Create Killer Compost
Dead trees! Killer compost! Thanks to DuPont and their herbicide Imprelis. | Garden Rant

Alright I've had my fun, I was just razzing you because you were coming off as a know it all, but in all honesty many so called scientific discovery's were because a scientist figured out why an "old timers trick worked" and then claimed it as there own. This is still done today, but in there rush to get out a paper(and get a fat grant) they sometimes get it wrong.
Oops! 5 retracted science studies from 2012 | Fox News
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/06/26/op...deas.html?_r=0



bill
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Old 03-19-2013, 08:31 AM
 
Location: Maine
2,349 posts, read 1,581,196 times
Reputation: 4200
Quote:
Originally Posted by eyewrist View Post
The OP never says where they place them, how many or what type but if I were to do so I would have placed it right under the seedling. I have planted seeds only to find a fungus had over taken them so a pinch of sulfur under them would have been benefical. And yes when I was a teen, which was many moons ago, science was confused that insect could fly when by scientific theory they were not supposedly able to do so. Now they understand this. This how quickly theories can change or become obsolete.
I believe that scientific theory had said that the Bumble Bee should not be able to fly.

bill
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Old 03-19-2013, 09:16 AM
 
4,743 posts, read 8,437,192 times
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eyewrist and roadrat - watching Seinfeld's "Bee Movie" isn't the same as science...

Quote:
"Like the bumblebee, they said it could never fly."

...Indeed, the venerable line about scientists having proved that a bumblebee can't fly appears regularly in magazine and newspaper stories. It's also the kind of item that can come up in a cocktail party conversation when the subject turns to science or technology...

Often, the statement is made in a distinctly disparaging tone aimed at putting down those know-it-all scientists and engineers who are so smart yet can't manage to understand something that's apparent to everyone else...

Whatever its origins, the story has had remarkable staying power, and the myth persists that science says a bumblebee can't fly. Indeed, this myth has taken on a new life of its own as a piece of "urban folklore" on the Internet...

The persistence of the bumblebee myth also highlights a misunderstanding about science, models, and mathematics. The real issue isn't that scientists can be wrong. The real issue is that there's a crucial difference between a "thing" and a mathematical model of the "thing."

The distinction between mathematics and the application of mathematics often isn't made as clearly as it ought to be. In the mathematics classroom, it's important to distinguish between getting the mathematics right and getting the problem right... no one "proved" that a bumblebee can't fly. What was shown was that a certain simple mathematical model wasn't adequate or appropriate for describing the flight of a bumblebee.
Flight of the Bumblebee | Numbers | Science News

Quote:
The "bumblebee argument", in pseudoscience, states that the laws of aerodynamics prove that the bumblebee can't fly, as it does not have the required capacity (in terms of wing area or flapping speed). Consequently, therefore, science can be shown to be in error, providing a loophole for pseudoscientific "explanations"...

Unfortunately (for the pseudoscientists), the laws of physics do not in any way forbid bumblebee flight; there are no papers that deny bumblebee flight, and no scientist has done so in a lecture, except, perhaps, ironically. To put it simply, it is possible to "prove" that a bumblebee cannot fly if you perform an extremely crude calculation (like forgetting to take into account things like the rate of flapping, the rotation of the wing, or the action of vortices), but a full aerodynamic calculation will show that the bumblebee's flight works perfectly fine.
Bumblebee argument - RationalWiki
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Old 03-19-2013, 10:11 AM
 
Location: Maine
2,349 posts, read 1,581,196 times
Reputation: 4200
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reactionary View Post
eyewrist and roadrat - watching Seinfeld's "Bee Movie" isn't the same as science...



Flight of the Bumblebee | Numbers | Science News



Bumblebee argument - RationalWiki
So basically one group of "scientist" said a bee should not be able to fly and another group came along and proved the how and why that they could.
great!



bill
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