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Old 03-24-2013, 01:27 PM
 
3,339 posts, read 7,177,937 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ukrkoz View Post
With no offense, but for the squeamish ones, that will start posting "OMG, how can you even think of this" replies, Japan is one of the world leading gardeners, and they use human waste left and right.
That's correct, and one reason we will never import produce from China.
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Old 03-24-2013, 01:30 PM
 
3,339 posts, read 7,177,937 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles View Post
I wouldn't do it. Too risky. What happens if you miscalculate the concentrations of the chemicals/elements/compounds which are supposed to help your garden? You could ruin the garden and poison the soil.

What happens if you violate some sort of health code or ordinance?

What about the risk of getting an infection if you come in contact with this stuff?

What about your neighbors?

Sounds like more of a hassle than it is worth.

Spend the $10 and buy a bag of general purpose fertilizer.

I agree. I cannot imagine that hooking up a sump pump to the final tank of your septic system wouldn't be a serious violation of health laws. And if it stinks anywhere near as bad as when people get their septic tanks pumped, you will be busted not just by your wife, but by everyone else in your area as well.

If you want to use the water from your septic system for your tomatoes, plant them down slope from your drainfield. We have some of the healthiest pines you ever saw being fed by our septic system -- even in a drought period.
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Old 03-24-2013, 01:59 PM
 
Location: Land of Free Johnson-Weld-2016
6,474 posts, read 13,406,838 times
Reputation: 6404
My mom said when she was little the best vegetables grew right outside the outhouse. LOL I wouldn't do it, though. I agree you could mess up the septic system by trying to redirect the water. I assume it is going to the drainage field, right? I personally think it would be better for the environment, but you'd have to make sure you washed yourself and the veggies well before eating them or feeding them to others.

Alternate ways of reusing the waste are to compost as much as you can and pee outside in the yard instead of in the toilet. LOL I'm not sure about the poop. If you want to reuse the poop and keep all that valuable fertilizer LOL. You can build a composting toilet.
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Old 03-24-2013, 02:17 PM
 
9,818 posts, read 13,892,257 times
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So no one actually used it, but everyone has opinion. And it may be my bad, I may have used wrong term. Grey water it is. It is sort of grayish.

only we would be able to eat the food and not get sick

This actually makes perfect sense. Grey water is full of organic markers for the particular family that produces it. I can see possible allergic reactions to bio markers in it from strangers. Chances though are miniscule.
Keep in mind 2 things

1. aquaponics. No one is cleansing fish poo that plants take in, and somehow it's a booming industry. Fish poo, plants grow and suck on it, people eat it and enjoy.
2. motherearth site, which is one of the prime homesteading sites out there, actually encourages grey water use for homesteading. That's how I even came across the idea.

The fish fertilizer remark also does not work.

A smaller quantity of fish fertilizer is manufactured through a process of enzymatic deterioration. Using this alternative method of producing fertilizer, the fish parts are placed in a vat to which enzymes are added. The enzymes break down the fish solids into a liquid without the use of extreme heat. This process may preserve more of the natural amino acids, vitamins and other nutrients.[LEFT]
Pardon me, but that's exactly what happens in septic.

Oh, and it's legal for subterranean irrigation in my state.

Irrigating Plants with Greywater :: Washington State Dept. of Health

And this is straight grey water, right out of system, not AFTER processed in 3 septic tank compartments.

Greywater is suitable for irrigating lawns, trees, ornamentals, and food crops. Though irrigation methods in greenhouses may differ greatly from outdoor irrigation, several guidelines for use of greywater apply to both situations.
  • Apply greywater directly to the soil, not through a sprinkler or any method that would allow contact with the above-ground portion of the plants.
  • Root crops which are eaten uncooked should not be irrigated with greywater.
  • Plants that thrive only in acid soil should not be watered with greywater, which is alkaline.
  • Use greywater only on well-established plants, not seedlings or young plants.
Oh, and now I know difference between grey and black waters. Black was in contact with human waste.


Also found this:


Can the overflow from a septic sewer system be used to water my vegie garden /lawn? - Yahoo!7 Answers


So it's a tossed opinion.



hey, thanks all for insights, they are valued. I am out of this thread.



Be well, live long.



[/LEFT]
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Old 03-24-2013, 03:24 PM
 
Location: Went around the corner & now I'm lost!!!!
1,550 posts, read 2,958,784 times
Reputation: 1217
Ukrkoz, your statements here make plenty of sense to me. But most people can't think outside the box even if someone points some logical facts to them. It's okay to put manmade chemicals in the environment, not knowing it's long term affect to plants, animals and even to ourselves but it's unthinkable to put organic matter back into the environment?

In the 70s and 80s when I was in school, instructors taught us to think about a given situation, topic, research, whatever and don't take everything as gospel. But since the 90s and forward what I am seeing more and more are people who don't take new ideas into consideration but will swallow up anything that a group of "experts" tell them it is fact. Critical thinking is evidently not being incorporated in the school/college educational system as it was in the past. Not your fault, not their fault, not my fault but terribly sad to see.

Sorry to see you leave this thread. I am seeing some of the most wisest, critical thinking, intelligent people leaving CD in the past year because of this..hate to see this happen.

PS
If it any consolation, I going weary of it myself
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Old 03-25-2013, 04:52 AM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
32,107 posts, read 39,170,046 times
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Which is it, gray water or black water?

Gray water is water from showers, kitchen sinks, the laundry. Many areas allow that to be diverted and used to irrigate yards, gardens, etc. (it can't go into the stormwater system directly or as runoff).

Black water is from toilets, I know of no jurisdiction that allows that to be done except as an irrigation source for ornamentals after final treatment at a sewer plant. This is done to lessen outflow into waterways.
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Old 03-25-2013, 07:33 AM
 
Location: Northern MN
3,869 posts, read 12,502,193 times
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We'll I'll never help you again if that is how you treat folks who freely give their time and knowledge to help you for FREE.
There is a big difference between gray and black water and you don't get grey water out of a septic tank.

Folks gave you the facts, their is no need to try and reinvent the wheel.
the work has been done for you.

Now if you want to scoop out your septic tank and compost it.
them after it has decomposed at temps well over 170*f it will be safe to use.
until then it is not. it's a health hazard and it is against the law to spread the contents of your septic on the ground or in your garden.


So just take your bat and ball and toss them in the septic.




Quote:
Originally Posted by ukrkoz View Post



So it's a tossed opinion.



hey, thanks all for insights, they are valued. I am out of this thread.



Be well, live long.



[/LEFT]
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Old 03-25-2013, 08:02 AM
 
797 posts, read 1,076,989 times
Reputation: 985
Quote:
Originally Posted by snofarmer View Post
We'll I'll never help you again if that is how you treat folks who freely give their time and knowledge to help you for FREE.
There is a big difference between gray and black water and you don't get grey water out of a septic tank.

Folks gave you the facts, their is no need to try and reinvent the wheel.
the work has been done for you.

Now if you want to scoop out your septic tank and compost it.
them after it has decomposed at temps well over 170*f it will be safe to use.
until then it is not. it's a health hazard and it is against the law to spread the contents of your septic on the ground or in your garden.


So just take your bat and ball and toss them in the septic.

Great post !
I agree.
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Old 03-25-2013, 08:43 AM
 
Location: Went around the corner & now I'm lost!!!!
1,550 posts, read 2,958,784 times
Reputation: 1217
Quote:
Originally Posted by snofarmer View Post
We'll I'll never help you again if that is how you treat folks who freely give their time and knowledge to help you for FREE.
There is a big difference between gray and black water and you don't get grey water out of a septic tank.

Folks gave you the facts, their is no need to try and reinvent the wheel.
the work has been done for you.

Now if you want to scoop out your septic tank and compost it.
them after it has decomposed at temps well over 170*f it will be safe to use.
until then it is not. it's a health hazard and it is against the law to spread the contents of your septic on the ground or in your garden.


So just take your bat and ball and toss them in the septic.
I think the OP point is if the sanitation facility can convert this waste and remove it from drinking water we use everyday, then why can't we convert that same by-product into useful material to grow vegetables on a individual scale?

Much like Mr Jenkins who wrote the Humanure book. We all know if Mr Jenkins had presented this idea to city officials sanitation dept, they would have told him he couldn't do it; that is was impossible because the he would be unable to do that because of blah, blah, blah, much like the people on this thread has done to the OP. But this man Mr Jenkins took an idea upon himself to test to see that human waste along with degradable organic material could be recycled into a usuable soil. He showed it can be done and now his book is international.

Question. Would city official in your location want you to know about this type of recycling? Of course not because that would mean they would gradually lose revenue or at least have to lower their rate for sewage and waste recovery. God forbid if the majority of your city residents begins to do this, the officials would be pissed.

All the OP is saying think of the possibility of this being done...take it into consideration...can we do this as indivduals...think about it. That's all he is asking.

In essence, you all have taken an innovative idea of the OP and shot it down without careful consideration.

Last edited by eyewrist; 03-25-2013 at 08:51 AM..
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Old 03-25-2013, 09:30 AM
 
Location: Northern MN
3,869 posts, read 12,502,193 times
Reputation: 3540
You are not charged if you have a septic system it is owned by the home owner, so no savings.

I don't see folks disconnecting from the municipality sewer system for irrigation or to save the cost of treatment.

But the OP has no planes to treat or to compost his fecal matter.
He just wants to pump it right out of his tank.
The drugs they take do not decompose easily or at all.

I stand by my advice to the op.

For careful consideration...
It is unwise and a health risk to use the black water with out some sort of treatment first.


Quote:
Originally Posted by eyewrist View Post
I think the OP point is if the sanitation facility can convert this waste and remove it from drinking water we use everyday, then why can't we convert that same by-product into useful material to grow vegetables on a individual scale?

Much like Mr Jenkins who wrote the Humanure book. We all know if Mr Jenkins had presented this idea to city officials sanitation dept, they would have told him he couldn't do it; that is was impossible because the he would be unable to do that because of blah, blah, blah, much like the people on this thread has done to the OP. But this man Mr Jenkins took an idea upon himself to test to see that human waste along with degradable organic material could be recycled into a usuable soil. He showed it can be done and now his book is international.

Question. Would city official in your location want you to know about this type of recycling? Of course not because that would mean they would gradually lose revenue or at least have to lower their rate for sewage and waste recovery. God forbid if the majority of your city residents begins to do this, the officials would be pissed.

All the OP is saying think of the possibility of this being done...take it into consideration...can we do this as indivduals...think about it. That's all he is asking.

In essence, you all have taken an innovative idea of the OP and shot it down without careful consideration.
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