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Old 03-24-2013, 09:12 AM
 
9,815 posts, read 13,883,984 times
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Hi all.

Has anyone used black water for fertilization? For those in no know what it is, it's the final product coming out of septic tank. For what I understand, it's about the richest nutrient simply dumped into soil.

Personally, I have no issues using it. I used fish fertilizer and that is a pungent one to apply.

But my wife being her, is opposed to anything that is "unorthodox" or "culturally unacceptable" by HER standards. Thing is, I could sneak a sump pump into the final tank without her even knowing it, but if it betrays me with obvious smell, I'll have 2 weeks of "sleeping on the couch".

So, if you actually used black water, how is it? I just built a large garden bed for tomatoes right next to the septic, and can easily feed it with that water. See that gravel spot in the flowerbed middle, past the garden bed? That's septic.

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Old 03-24-2013, 09:16 AM
 
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With no offense, but for the squeamish ones, that will start posting "OMG, how can you even think of this" replies, Japan is one of the world leading gardeners, and they use human waste left and right.
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Old 03-24-2013, 09:40 AM
 
Location: Las Flores, Orange County, CA
26,346 posts, read 80,739,113 times
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I wouldn't do it. Too risky. What happens if you miscalculate the concentrations of the chemicals/elements/compounds which are supposed to help your garden? You could ruin the garden and poison the soil.

What happens if you violate some sort of health code or ordinance?

What about the risk of getting an infection if you come in contact with this stuff?

What about your neighbors?

Sounds like more of a hassle than it is worth.

Spend the $10 and buy a bag of general purpose fertilizer.

Last edited by Charles; 03-24-2013 at 09:53 AM..
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Old 03-24-2013, 09:44 AM
 
Location: Went around the corner & now I'm lost!!!!
1,550 posts, read 2,958,126 times
Reputation: 1217
Quote:
Originally Posted by ukrkoz View Post
With no offense, but for the squeamish ones, that will start posting "OMG, how can you even think of this" replies, Japan is one of the world leading gardeners, and they use human waste left and right.
Your right it will start a mess of opposition. But I think it is a great and interesting idea! You can find books on recycling greywater but none on blackwater. There is even a book (Humanure) on recycling bulk human waste into compost on a small scale but not large quantities and mixed as found in septic tanks. You have raised my curiosity now

Last edited by eyewrist; 03-24-2013 at 09:52 AM..
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Old 03-24-2013, 09:55 AM
 
Location: Aiken, South Carolina, US of A
1,752 posts, read 3,619,409 times
Reputation: 3521
How much is your health worth?
Ten dollars? a hundred dollars? Really.
Why do you think when you were a little kid
adults told you to wash your hands after you went
to the bathroom?
Think about that.
E. Coli
Gessshhhhhh
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Old 03-24-2013, 09:56 AM
 
Location: Northern MN
3,869 posts, read 12,498,951 times
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Black water, I wouldn't. Human excrement carries multiple bacteria, including e-coli, other coliform bacteria, salmonella and drugs that have past threw your system just to name a few. These bacteria are responsible for many food borne outbreaks.




Even some grey water is not so good for the garden.
Untreated greywater can be used for garden watering if used immediately after it is produced. The waste water from kitchen sinks and dishwashers is not usually collected as it is too heavily contaminated.

Soil is very effective at filtering out many contaminants in grey water. However water containing soap or detergents does have the potential to cause soil, especially clay based soils, to lose their structure.

Water that has been used with bleach or boron compounds most often found in dishwasher detergents should not be used. Even grey water should not be used for watering edible crops.
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Old 03-24-2013, 10:11 AM
 
Location: Kenmore, WA
7,359 posts, read 6,214,097 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ukrkoz View Post
I just built a large garden bed for tomatoes right next to the septic, and can easily feed it with that water. See that gravel spot in the flowerbed middle, past the garden bed? That's septic.
Actually, it IS septic, and ill-conceived. I am not talking opinion here, but fact. The fish emulsifier you buy is processed to remove the toxic attributes. Unless you are taking action to sterilize the contents of your septic tank, you could poison yourself and others with the practice.

If my memory serves me, the suggestion is to use black water on non-food crops only, all others, only after the fertilizer has "rested" for more than four years.
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Old 03-24-2013, 10:31 AM
 
Location: Under the Redwoods
3,748 posts, read 5,811,743 times
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All waste turned into fertilizer has had time to break-down. You won't get that from an in use septic tank. Now the contents of a composting toilet is a different story.
Human waste is wonderful fertilizer, but not from a septic tank that has other things in it like chemicals -and is not yet broken down.
When I was homesteading, the geologist who was doing the perk test said that we could use the black water for the garden (thinking we would put the leech-lines under the garden area) but only we would be able to eat the food and not get sick. Not sure how true that is, but does sound a little logical. But I also got the feeling from the whole of the conversation is that it's not quite legal.

I'm not in shivers by the idea, but I'll stand with your wife on this one.
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Old 03-24-2013, 10:39 AM
 
797 posts, read 1,076,716 times
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Dumb and dangerous !
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Old 03-24-2013, 12:50 PM
 
Location: Long Neck,De
4,793 posts, read 6,503,464 times
Reputation: 4741
Just think if your wife gets sick from eating some of your veggies it might be more than 2 week on the couch!!
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