U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 04-17-2013, 10:09 AM
 
25,631 posts, read 29,279,505 times
Reputation: 23051

Advertisements

Group ranks Colorado River the nation’s most endangered waterway, citing drought and demand - The Washington Post

Just wanted to post this for those that think "fake" grass isnt a good idea.

EVERYONE can to do more to wasteless of one of our most precious commodities. FRESH WATER.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-17-2013, 10:42 AM
 
Location: Somewhere in northern Alabama
16,935 posts, read 51,623,828 times
Reputation: 27956
Moving to an arid region and complaining about the lack of fresh water seems somehow poetic - as in poetic justice. I have nothing against "fake" lawns, but suspect that turning desert into farmland starting as soon as diversion canals were built just might be part of the problem.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-17-2013, 10:46 AM
 
Location: Las Flores, Orange County, CA
26,346 posts, read 81,042,646 times
Reputation: 17424
I'm not wasting water; All the water I use to hose down my driveway goes right back into the ocean.

There isn't a shortage of water - just a shortage of pipes.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-17-2013, 10:53 AM
 
25,631 posts, read 29,279,505 times
Reputation: 23051
Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles View Post
I'm not wasting water; All the water I use to hose down my driveway goes right back into the ocean.

There isn't a shortage of water - just a shortage of pipes.
Fresh water.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-17-2013, 11:04 AM
 
Location: Las Flores, Orange County, CA
26,346 posts, read 81,042,646 times
Reputation: 17424
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bulldogdad View Post
Fresh water.

There's just as much fresh water around today as there was 2000 years ago. Any water that flows to the ocean evaporates and eventually rains down to the earth.

People don't waste water; they waste money having water delivered to their homes. The water just ends up where it came from.

People are moving to dry areas like the Front Range in Colorado where the aquafiers are expected to be depleted in the next 50 years.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-18-2013, 07:52 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
29,792 posts, read 47,704,290 times
Reputation: 17707
Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles View Post
There's just as much fresh water around today as there was 2000 years ago. Any water that flows to the ocean evaporates and eventually rains down to the earth.
I agree.



I am on a few homesteading and survival forums. A lot of people will argue to their dying breath the 'advantages' of moving to regions with repeated droughts.

I do not get it, but many do.



A lot of people move to arid places, places that see repeated droughts; and then they whine about the lack of fresh water. Turning desert into farmland under FDR was a part of the problem. Now much of that former farmland has became urban sprawl.

In the Mohave desert, I read about recent history of sprawl. One valley had barely enough water to support a dozen apple trees, and no more. Developers bought the valley, marketed the 'beauty' of dead dry desert, and today Apple Valley [and surrounding towns] have over a million residents. Nowhere in the process have they ever had sufficient water for such a population. Yet they still continue to build more housing.



I live on land that is beside a river. Whether I use a cup of water or a gallon of water, has no effect on the river. I have 2 year-round creeks flowing across my land, again my use of this water has no effect, as they continue to flow year-round.

I can leave a garden hose flowing all summer long. It would effect my electric bill, but it would not affect the water.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top