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Old 07-16-2013, 04:28 PM
 
Location: Hot Springs
1,036 posts, read 1,133,002 times
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Default Day Lilly's

Is there a good, better, or best time to split daylilies? I have been told by some people that the spring is the best time. Other's will say the fall. My thought is to split them after they are done blooming in the summer, but late enough so the weather has cooled a bit. Does anyone know? Fwiw, I live in a semi-arid region.

uh
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Old 07-16-2013, 04:35 PM
Status: "Happy Chris Day" (set 2 days ago)
 
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winter
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Old 07-16-2013, 06:02 PM
 
Location: Hot Springs
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bulldogdad View Post
winter
In frozen ground?????

uh
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Old 07-16-2013, 06:06 PM
Status: "Love Wins in North Carolina!" (set 3 days ago)
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
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whenever you have time.

In my area (South) they can be successfully divided anytime, the ground never freezes and the foliage does die back in winter so I usually divide after they have bloomed. But I also divide while in full bloom if I am trying to arrange by color or height. They look a bit putrid right after they are divided but while in full bloom is the only time I can be sure of the right color combinations I am trying to accomplish.

When I was getting my horticulture degree we had to learn the right time for pruning, dividing, spraying, etc. But our teacher, a retired 35 year county agent told us the best time to do anything is when you have time. So maybe you miss a season of hydrangea bloom...big deal. You'll catch it next year!
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Old 07-16-2013, 06:27 PM
 
Location: Hot Springs
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Thank you. I am thinking the best time would be when they are dormant, however that can present some weather problems on the high plains of South Dakota. I like your solution.

uh
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Old 07-16-2013, 08:32 PM
Status: "Happy Chris Day" (set 2 days ago)
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by uncleharley View Post
In frozen ground?????

uh
Seems like a little detail you left out. Double

Yes divide BEFORE, the ground freezes over.
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Old 07-16-2013, 10:00 PM
 
Location: Dallas, Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by uncleharley View Post
Thank you. I am thinking the best time would be when they are dormant, however that can present some weather problems on the high plains of South Dakota. I like your solution.

uh
You're in AR? I don't know for sure, but I split mine in the fall. Might be the best time for you, too.
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Old 07-16-2013, 10:11 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by uncleharley View Post
Is there a good, better, or best time to split daylilies? I have been told by some people that the spring is the best time. Other's will say the fall. My thought is to split them after they are done blooming in the summer, but late enough so the weather has cooled a bit. Does anyone know? Fwiw, I live in a semi-arid region.

uh
This is why one of the questions I ask before giving an answer is where are you? That way you don't get the right answer for the wrong place like the one below.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bulldogdad View Post
winter
Not likely for me,either, although my ground hasn't fully frozen it has come close enough for several winters that I don't want to try using a *****x to garden. It's probably a great time for deep south and California types.

Uncleharley NoKudzu covered a lot of territory but essentially gave you good info on how easy they are to transplant. Having gardened in both northern and more southern climes there are differences in what you can do and when you can do it that depend on your local climate. For your area you can probably transplant them at any time the soil is workable and you won't have heat stroke. For the *best possible times* there will be two best times. Mid to late spring (before they bloom but when the soil is easy to dig and not frozen) and late summer to very early fall. By transplanting them in the spring you may sacrifice blooms for the year. Note I say may because daylilies are pretty much the toughest plants out there and can surprise you. Transplanting them in late August to mid September (I think that is before you have freezing temperatures) you will give them a chance to put in roots and store some energy before going dormant. They will then be able to bloom on time come next summer. Water will be essential in giving them a chance to set roots. Once they have been in place a while they have fairly deep roots and can manage on far less water.

Just to show how tough they can be, I picked up several at a daylily festival during last year's heat wave here. That was the end of June and the rest of the summer was hot and dry. I purchased and planted them in 104-106 degree days. I watered them every day for the first weeks but much less after that. Initially they looked a bit sad but one day a new leaf shot up here and there on all of them. Only one of the plants put out any blooms, and that one only had one stalk with 2 or 3 flowers. I left them alone. Fast forward to this spring and the plants had tripled in size and they have been constantly blooming for the last 3 weeks.
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Old 07-17-2013, 12:04 AM
 
Location: Lake Oswego, Oregon
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I just looked up your location from the Zip Code in your profile. If it were the Arkansas 'Hot Springs', the answer would be "anytime". That's what the experts say about planting Day Lilies in the South. South Dakota, however, probably presents hardiness problems for just about any plant.

I'd guess the Day Lilies, in your case, need a few months to become established, before the freezes begin. (In Hot Springs Arkansas, the ground probably only freezes every twenty years or so - and then, only for a few days at a time).

So, ideally, you'd need to have those Day Lilies in the ground by the first of August. Just my guess...

And I'd imagine they'd need a heavy mulch, their first year or two, applied as soon as the first frost kills the foliage down. They may even need heavy mulch EVERY year. Depends on whether these are extra-hardy Siberian/Manchurian/Kamchatka type Day Lilies, or just regular ones like people are planting in 'regular' climates like New York's and Portland's.
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Old 07-17-2013, 07:41 AM
 
Location: Hot Springs
1,036 posts, read 1,133,002 times
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Thank You everyone for your info and suggestions. I apologize for not mentioning that my location is Hot Springs, SD, not AR. My home and garden is at about 4,000 feet on the southern edge of the Black Hills. We also have a geo-thermal formation below us which keeps the ground temp warmer than expected, except where it is baked by the sun or frozen by the wind. The soil is red clay. Expected annual rainfall is around 15 inches. Droughts are common.
At this point, my plan is to begin transplanting and splitting the day lilies in sept after the summer temps have cooled but before freezing weather is common. I plan to do a lot of watering and soil conditioning along with the transplanting. Anything that I do not get done in the fall, can be done in the spring, probably late may. Since a former owner or two planted these and other plants, I have no way of knowing what kind they are, but they seem to be hardy and beautiful.
Any further suggestions will be greatly appreciated.

uh
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