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Old 06-28-2016, 09:58 PM
 
4,755 posts, read 8,381,946 times
Reputation: 3414

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Quote:
Originally Posted by karen_in_nh_2012 View Post
I have some areas that I want to cover with gravel or whatever else I can to keep ANYTHING from growing there -- e.g., the perimeter of my house where the basement walls/windows are, the area around the propane tank, etc. Right now those places are a mix of weeds/grass (yuck). How do I get rid of everything so I can cover the area with gravel? (Sorry, I know this is a beginner's question, but that's what I am!!)

I'm in New Hampshire, zone 5b.

Thanks in advance!!
Karen,

Do as others have suggested, lay down packing boxes then 3-4 inches of wood chips on top. This should save you from weeds for a couple of years. After that, you will still need to pull weeds out as seeds get blown in and grow but should be easier because of soft wood chips. You will also need to replenish wood chips as they get "consumed" by microbes in the soil. The ground will be rich in "black gold" in a couple of years. Too bad you do not want things to grow in there otherwise it will be perfect for flower beds by then.

For something a bit more "permanent", I would pour concrete over where you want NOTHING to grow and with NO maintenance just about. Think of it as "hardscape" design around the house. I would mix in color dyes on top of concrete so you can pick the color you want. Alternatively, you can use bricks or pavers to accomplish the same objective. Be sure to put down a layer of sand underneath first.

Hope this help with very little controversy
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Old 06-29-2016, 01:57 AM
 
Location: Southern New Hampshire
6,720 posts, read 11,739,154 times
Reputation: 19354
Quote:
Originally Posted by HB2HSV View Post
Karen,

Do as others have suggested, lay down packing boxes then 3-4 inches of wood chips on top. This should save you from weeds for a couple of years. After that, you will still need to pull weeds out as seeds get blown in and grow but should be easier because of soft wood chips. You will also need to replenish wood chips as they get "consumed" by microbes in the soil. The ground will be rich in "black gold" in a couple of years. Too bad you do not want things to grow in there otherwise it will be perfect for flower beds by then.

For something a bit more "permanent", I would pour concrete over where you want NOTHING to grow and with NO maintenance just about. Think of it as "hardscape" design around the house. I would mix in color dyes on top of concrete so you can pick the color you want. Alternatively, you can use bricks or pavers to accomplish the same objective. Be sure to put down a layer of sand underneath first.

Hope this help with very little controversy
OP here. Please note that my original question was posted ALMOST THREE YEARS AGO. Someone revived this thread a few days ago for reasons I don't even try to understand (really wish C-D would "lock" threads after a certain number of months/years).

Anyway, I ended up using cardboard, and it has worked pretty well. I'm still in the process of re-doing the landscaping all around my house, so I will continue to try things. (Don't want to use concrete, as most of the places where I want nothing to grow are around the perimeter of my house -- one purpose is to keep little creatures, like mice, away from my foundation. In the front and on one side of my house [so far], I've put down cardboard, then marble chips. I put potted plants/flowers on the marble chips -- don't want to PLANT anything, but I still like looking at flowers there. )

Thanks for your post, and reps to you.
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Old 06-29-2016, 08:28 AM
 
4,755 posts, read 8,381,946 times
Reputation: 3414
Karen, ooops I should've look at the date on the OP

But I am glad to read about your update .

Thanks for the rep
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Old 06-29-2016, 11:19 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
31,164 posts, read 57,288,199 times
Reputation: 52030
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kreutz View Post
Saline soil=dead soil. Dead soil=no plants.
Just because it works doesn't mean it's a good idea.
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Old 06-30-2016, 08:44 AM
 
4,755 posts, read 8,381,946 times
Reputation: 3414
Quote:
Originally Posted by TinaMcG View Post
This is a prime example of why you should not believe everything you read on the internet.

What an incredibly ignorant and irresponsible piece of advice. I won't even go into all the reasons it's so bad. I won't dignify it with any more keystrokes.
I know [now] this is an old thread but Tina's post reminded me an old story.

I posted awhile ago that I feed my vegetables & plants this chemical that seem to work very well. The leaves are greener, vegetables taste better, my tomatoes are bigger & sweeter. But this chemical can be harmful to the environment if not apply correctly. You can just imagine all the attacks I received from those who cares about the environment.

This chemical could KILL humans and animals if not applied correctly. It also is a great BLEACHING agent to get rid of stains on clothes. But my vegetables & plants seem to thrive with it. If fact, they'll look a bit droopy & sad if I don't give it to them in a few days. I'd swear they suffer from withdrawal.

The chemical is called hydrogen dioxide. I think I can patent it & sell it.
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Old 06-30-2016, 09:18 AM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
64,990 posts, read 47,303,288 times
Reputation: 10512
Cardboard or ............


I pulled this tarp away after sitting there for weeks...not 1 single weed grew underneath it. Beautiful...unless you don't like the look of tarps. lol


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Old 06-30-2016, 10:55 AM
 
4,108 posts, read 3,447,161 times
Reputation: 8179
I've used rolled roofing, tar paper with little crushed green white rocks on it between rows in garden for non muddy walkways. Nothing grows through that. You can pick up damaged rolls for cheap at home improvement centers. It lasts forever and is easily rolled up and moved.

If I didn't want anything to grow somewhere & wanted non cement solution... I would roll it out, cut to size with utility knife, and cover with a more visually attractive mulch.
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Old 06-30-2016, 01:57 PM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
64,990 posts, read 47,303,288 times
Reputation: 10512
Quote:
Originally Posted by historyfan View Post
I've used rolled roofing, tar paper
That's actually a great idea! Thanks.


I also just thought about an area I will do that. It's where poison ivy keeps growing!
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Old 06-30-2016, 03:02 PM
 
Location: Milwaukee Area of WI
1,782 posts, read 1,130,322 times
Reputation: 1756
Quote:
Originally Posted by HB2HSV View Post
I know [now] this is an old thread but Tina's post reminded me an old story.

I posted awhile ago that I feed my vegetables & plants this chemical that seem to work very well. The leaves are greener, vegetables taste better, my tomatoes are bigger & sweeter. But this chemical can be harmful to the environment if not apply correctly. You can just imagine all the attacks I received from those who cares about the environment.

This chemical could KILL humans and animals if not applied correctly. It also is a great BLEACHING agent to get rid of stains on clothes. But my vegetables & plants seem to thrive with it. If fact, they'll look a bit droopy & sad if I don't give it to them in a few days. I'd swear they suffer from withdrawal.

The chemical is called hydrogen dioxide. I think I can patent it & sell it.


BaaaaaaaaaaaaHaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa

Hydrogen Dioxide. That made me laugh
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Old 07-02-2016, 03:26 AM
 
2 posts, read 1,140 times
Reputation: 10
You can just cut off or chop out all extra grass in of your basement by using any equipment for making the basement place full with gravel.
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