U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 10-25-2013, 09:52 PM
 
Location: U.S.A.
966 posts, read 936,790 times
Reputation: 269

Advertisements

What plant hardiness zone do you live in or do you consider your location as being part of?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-26-2013, 12:45 AM
 
95 posts, read 117,912 times
Reputation: 152
I used to live in zone 7a, now I am in zone 9. I am still trying to get used to it. I love that I can garden more!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-26-2013, 07:28 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
26,969 posts, read 41,836,808 times
Reputation: 13653
We are in the 4b to 5a border-line.

For maybe 2 months we will normally see 5f to -5F temp variations. For 1 or 2 nights in January, we see it dip to -20F. Usually the second or third week of January.

I bring our rosemary, aloe, citrus trees, figs, olives, pomegranates, Sweet Bay laurels indoors for winter. It was one of my chores this past week.

Interestingly peaches are okay and can stay outside. It is very site specific though. We have friends who do really well with their peaches.

My attempts with peaches outside have not been successful. The same goes with my attempts with Sochi Tea.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-26-2013, 11:22 AM
 
Location: near a beach
13,482 posts, read 12,883,591 times
Reputation: 20823
Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
We are in the 4b to 5a border-line.

For maybe 2 months we will normally see 5f to -5F temp variations. For 1 or 2 nights in January, we see it dip to -20F. Usually the second or third week of January.

I bring our rosemary, aloe, citrus trees, figs, olives, pomegranates, Sweet Bay laurels indoors for winter. It was one of my chores this past week.

Interestingly peaches are okay and can stay outside. It is very site specific though. We have friends who do really well with their peaches.

My attempts with peaches outside have not been successful. The same goes with my attempts with Sochi Tea.
Do those plants grow inside during the winter? I used to try to keep rosemary alive OUTside all winter until I read somewhere that it's impossible in New England. I saw a live rosemary plant outside somewhere around Christmas one time but it died during the freezing cold of January.
__________________
my posts as moderator will be in red. Moderator: Health&Wellness~Genealogy. The Rules--read here>>> TOS. If someone attacks you, do not reply. Hit REPORT.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-26-2013, 11:53 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
26,969 posts, read 41,836,808 times
Reputation: 13653
Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
Do those plants grow inside during the winter? I used to try to keep rosemary alive OUTside all winter until I read somewhere that it's impossible in New England. I saw a live rosemary plant outside somewhere around Christmas one time but it died during the freezing cold of January.
I have most of them in 5-gallon buckets.

I bring them inside after the first soft frost, but before the first hard freeze. They will stay indoors until spring.

Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-28-2013, 10:32 PM
 
1,130 posts, read 506,362 times
Reputation: 373
I live in bandon, Oregon on the upper end of the southern Oregon coast which according to the new USDA maps is zone 9b. the maritime/oceanic climate here has very wet (around 50") cool winters with fairly rare frosts and very dry and cool summers (a "warm" day is around 70f.) so "our" 9b is probably very different from most anybody else's "normal" 9b. the climate is great for growing rhododendrons, azaleas, camellias, hydrangeas, fuchsias, and Japanese maples but I am also able to grow a wide variety of stuff from Australia (eucalyptus, acacias), new Zealand (new Zealand "flax" and cordyline australis), south America (nothofagus, embothrium) and mexico (pines, oaks) plus other weird stuff from other parts of the world.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-28-2013, 11:18 PM
 
95 posts, read 117,912 times
Reputation: 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by georgeinbandonoregon View Post
I live in bandon, Oregon on the upper end of the southern Oregon coast which according to the new USDA maps is zone 9b. the maritime/oceanic climate here has very wet (around 50") cool winters with fairly rare frosts and very dry and cool summers (a "warm" day is around 70f.) so "our" 9b is probably very different from most anybody else's "normal" 9b. the climate is great for growing rhododendrons, azaleas, camellias, hydrangeas, fuchsias, and Japanese maples but I am also able to grow a wide variety of stuff from Australia (eucalyptus, acacias), new Zealand (new Zealand "flax" and cordyline australis), south America (nothofagus, embothrium) and mexico (pines, oaks) plus other weird stuff from other parts of the world.
I never would have through Bandon was 9b. My grandparents lived in Coos Bay when I was a kid. Your 9b is different then my 9b in the Sacramento Valley.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-28-2013, 11:34 PM
 
1,130 posts, read 506,362 times
Reputation: 373
I agree. the 2 climates are in many ways very different-- the only similarity is in the low temp numbers which is basically what USDA is all about. while the moisture patterns for both places are roughly similar (winter moisture/summer drought) the summer temperatures are very different sac very hot and bandon very not, LOL. OTOH, bandon's temperature and moisture patterns are rather more similar to coastal northern California---crescent city to eureka for example. it is at least in part because of the lumping of essentially very dissimilar climates in the "same" zone that sunset magazine devised it's very different gardening zone map which places sacramento in sunset 14 and bandon in sunset 5. that said, we can grow a number of similar types of plants that can be grown in sac---agapanthus, bottlebrush, acacia, eucalyptus, some palm trees agaves ,redwoods, evergreen oaks (different types of bottlebrush and eucalyptus and agaves in many cases to be sure) once again, the 9b rating for bandon is from the "new and improved" 2012 USDA map and i'm not especially invested in it's absolute validity or usefullness.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-29-2013, 07:33 AM
 
25,633 posts, read 25,242,730 times
Reputation: 22876
Zone 14. Yup I use the Sunset Garden Handbook zones for the Western U.S. MUCH more accurate than the USDA.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-06-2015, 08:46 PM
 
51 posts, read 36,667 times
Reputation: 32
I live in the Austin area which is 8b/9a. Warm and Subtropical.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $99,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2017, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32 - Top