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Old 01-09-2015, 10:57 PM
Status: "I hate cool and cold weather" (set 2 days ago)
 
Location: 46060, Hardiness zone 5b/6a
2,200 posts, read 1,587,930 times
Reputation: 715

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Quote:
Originally Posted by North 42 View Post
I'm hoping that this current cold wave doesn't get too severe, because the local Southern Mags took such a beating last winter. Hopefully all will be well, and there will be no leaf damage!
As another poster stated, the hardy varieties can withstand air temperatures as low as 10 below without being damaged, the greater indianapolis metro area has seen lows temperatures of between 7 and 10 below zero so far and tonight is expected to bottom out at around 5 below zero Fahrenheit, after another round of colder weather next week, a mid winter thaw may be in the offing. I too am hoping that this winter is not a repeat of last winter's anomalous arctic air outbreak, the likes of which had not been seen since 1994. Last winter the mercury bottomed out at around 15 below zero, and the two southern magnolias lost virtually all their leaves and so were much less fully leaved this past season as a result of last winter's brutally cold air intrusions, I personally don't think the Southern Magnolias here in indianapolis could tolerate another temperature reading of colder than 10 below zero, but if it happens it happens and I may just have to deal with the pain of seeing those two evergreen saplings croak on me come this spring.

Last edited by Isleofpalms85; 01-09-2015 at 11:05 PM..
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Old 01-11-2015, 09:45 AM
 
Location: Windsor Ontario
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We have only dropped to 0f so far this winter, way better than last year! I wasn't sure about how much cold the Mags can take after completely defoliating last winter. I've never seen them lose all their leaves here like that, so I am kind of worried about their ability to withstand sub zero lows again. Southern Mags are kind of new here, the largest one I know of is about 15 ft high, the rest are pretty young still. I guess I shouldn't be too worried then unless the lows drop way below zero again!
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Old 01-13-2015, 07:44 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Isleofpalms85 View Post
As another poster stated, the hardy varieties can withstand air temperatures as low as 10 below without being damaged, the greater indianapolis metro area has seen lows temperatures of between 7 and 10 below zero so far and tonight is expected to bottom out at around 5 below zero Fahrenheit, after another round of colder weather next week, a mid winter thaw may be in the offing. I too am hoping that this winter is not a repeat of last winter's anomalous arctic air outbreak, the likes of which had not been seen since 1994. Last winter the mercury bottomed out at around 15 below zero, and the two southern magnolias lost virtually all their leaves and so were much less fully leaved this past season as a result of last winter's brutally cold air intrusions, I personally don't think the Southern Magnolias here in indianapolis could tolerate another temperature reading of colder than 10 below zero, but if it happens it happens and I may just have to deal with the pain of seeing those two evergreen saplings croak on me come this spring.
Curiousity -- do you mean they lost all their leaves during the winter? Or that come spring, the old leaves dropped as new leaves formed??

Our magnolias (2 bracken's brown) seem to basically replace all their leaves every year over the course of the spring/early summer.

We have 2 larger/new trees. One is about 15 foot, one is about 10.

We had two small (thickness of index finger) young trees planted by the patio, but they got burned by a very late freeze. As a result, they lost the upper 2 thirds of the tree and we had to cut them back to essentially one branch. They survived, but we determined that the shape was too radically changed (they would become shrubs instead of trees, and we changed out for summer-blooming hydrangeas.

The two larger trees we have are both semi-sheltered with at least one wall for windbreak. They are thriving, and we're very pleased. Generally they bloom all summer long if we get sufficient spring rains.
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Old 01-13-2015, 06:11 PM
Status: "I hate cool and cold weather" (set 2 days ago)
 
Location: 46060, Hardiness zone 5b/6a
2,200 posts, read 1,587,930 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Briolat21 View Post
Curiousity -- do you mean they lost all their leaves during the winter? Or that come spring, the old leaves dropped as new leaves formed??

Our magnolias (2 bracken's brown) seem to basically replace all their leaves every year over the course of the spring/early summer.

We have 2 larger/new trees. One is about 15 foot, one is about 10.

We had two small (thickness of index finger) young trees planted by the patio, but they got burned by a very late freeze. As a result, they lost the upper 2 thirds of the tree and we had to cut them back to essentially one branch. They survived, but we determined that the shape was too radically changed (they would become shrubs instead of trees, and we changed out for summer-blooming hydrangeas.

The two larger trees we have are both semi-sheltered with at least one wall for windbreak. They are thriving, and we're very pleased. Generally they bloom all summer long if we get sufficient spring rains.


They lost virtually all of their leaves as the weather warmed up for spring(the leaves did take a major browning out and were severely sunburned) and then they looked largely bare for several weeks before they begun to fill in with new leaves over the spring and summer season and despite having to endure that brutal -15 F temperature they still had lots of flowers through the late spring and summer months. So far so good as far as failing to see a low temperature of colder than 10 below zero this winter, The coldest reading I have seen for the Metro Area was -10 degrees so far and that was a frost pocket in the far Northwest Suburbs of Indianapolis near Zionsville; Most areas within the city limits likely were between -7 and -9 Degrees Fahrenheit during this winters arctic air intrusion, which could be the coldest air for this winter season(just my prediction so I am not making any conclusions just yet), anyway, I saw those two southern magnolias(I am almost positive they are Bracken's Brown Beauties) the other day and they appeared to have some minor leaf bronzing/burn, especially on the south facing side of both trees, Time will tell just how much brown out and burn will occur this year but I honestly don't think it will be quite as severe as last year's given the fact that this year's cold snap to date wasn't as intense, it will be interesting to see just how much leaf drop will occur this spring as the trees flush off the old/damaged leaves to produce a new canopy of leaves

Last edited by Isleofpalms85; 01-13-2015 at 06:34 PM..
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Old 01-13-2015, 06:48 PM
Status: "I hate cool and cold weather" (set 2 days ago)
 
Location: 46060, Hardiness zone 5b/6a
2,200 posts, read 1,587,930 times
Reputation: 715
Quote:
Originally Posted by North 42 View Post
We have only dropped to 0f so far this winter, way better than last year! I wasn't sure about how much cold the Mags can take after completely defoliating last winter. I've never seen them lose all their leaves here like that, so I am kind of worried about their ability to withstand sub zero lows again. Southern Mags are kind of new here, the largest one I know of is about 15 ft high, the rest are pretty young still. I guess I shouldn't be too worried then unless the lows drop way below zero again!
Practically the entire city limits of Indianapolis excluding a few frost pockets northwest of the city of Indianapolis saw morning low temperatures of between -7 and -9 degrees Fahrenheit(a few local northern suburbs saw temperatures briefly dip to -10 degrees F), I think the morning low temperature where those two bracken's brown beauty Magnolia Saplings are located was likely at -8 or -9 Degrees F, and as a result of two sub zero nights in a row again this winter(albeit not as intense as last year's outbreak), the southern magnolia saplings near the restaurant as of January 10th, seemed to have minor leaf burn on about 40 percent of the foliage this time around. I suspect that because this is only their fourth winter in the ground In Indianapolis, that their roots are still developing and growing deeper into the soil matrix, and so these saplings are still hardening off as far as hardiness. There may still be considerable leaf brown out and drop as the new flush of new foliage fills in this spring and summer, perhaps this summer the saplings will have a fuller canopy of leaves(this will depend on whether we have indeed seen the coldest air for the winter and how harsh the rest of this winter season turns out to be), but as I mentioned above and to a previous poster, we are not out of the woods as far as arctic air intrusions are concerned, as it is not even mid January yet, so I am hanging in there and we shall see how these two saplings and other Southern Magnolia Saplings and seedlings in Indianapolis fare this winter(Southern Magnolias are a rare sight and seem to be a relatively new landscape addition as well in Indianapolis)
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Old 02-12-2015, 05:18 PM
 
Location: Windsor Ontario
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Things aren't looking good for our Mags with this latest Arctic air blast. I hope it's only a few nights at most of extreme cold temps. Our coldest night forecasted is -22c or -7.6f. Hopefully they escape with just a bit of bronzing and nothing worse!
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Old 02-12-2015, 06:53 PM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
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If I lived in Indy, I wouldn't plant a S. Magnolia. It's no fun watching plants go through a slow death.
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Old 02-13-2015, 06:39 PM
Status: "I hate cool and cold weather" (set 2 days ago)
 
Location: 46060, Hardiness zone 5b/6a
2,200 posts, read 1,587,930 times
Reputation: 715
Quote:
Originally Posted by North 42 View Post
Things aren't looking good for our Mags with this latest Arctic air blast. I hope it's only a few nights at most of extreme cold temps. Our coldest night forecasted is -22c or -7.6f. Hopefully they escape with just a bit of bronzing and nothing worse!

The southern magnolias on the northeast side of indianapolis have a bit of bronzing on their leaves but other than what appears to be relatively minor leaf burn they appear to be in better shape than at this time a year ago, and that forecasted low in your city is about the coldest indianapolis has seen this winter, the weather forecast in indianapolis calls for lows around 3 above zero tomorrow night and then a few more nights with lows in the single digits above zero for the next week. I too am a tad bit concerned about how much more cold these "cold hardy" southern magnolias can handle after these two saplings practically completely defoliated here in indianapolis last late March or Early April of last year, will be rather interesting to see what these young brackens brown beauties do this early spring as this is their 4th winter in the ground since they were planted in April of the year 2011.
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Old 02-14-2015, 05:49 AM
 
Location: Kalamalka Lake, B.C.
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As of right now our little (japanese?) magnolia is already budding out, so we plan to cover it if we get our expected temperature drop below freezing. These early high temp record breakers don't really help, as we've even got wasps coming out of hibernation. This tree is only five feet and due to very light pruning is ready to really grow this year.

These magnolias are pollinated by beetles? No kidding. We got three seeds last year, and usually don't get any seeds.
We're up in the north end of the Okanagan in British Columbia with a very large lake moderating some of the temp. fluctuations.
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Old 02-15-2015, 07:59 AM
Status: "I hate cool and cold weather" (set 2 days ago)
 
Location: 46060, Hardiness zone 5b/6a
2,200 posts, read 1,587,930 times
Reputation: 715
Quote:
Originally Posted by DougStark View Post
If I lived in Indy, I wouldn't plant a S. Magnolia. It's no fun watching plants go through a slow death.
And if I lived in the Desert in Arizona, I wouldn't go hog wild on water demanding subtropical and tropical vegetation, I would plant such things sparingly and would focus more on xeriscaping.
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