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Old 01-14-2014, 07:05 AM
 
Location: Windsor Ontario
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gardener34 View Post
Chicago we have star magnolias which survive nicely. The tulip magnolias (not sure if they are southern) are hit or miss. If you have an early warmth then a frost, all the buds form then freeze drop off. This occurs every 5 years or so.
Southern magnolia have large shiny evergreen leaves with felty brown undersides.
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Old 01-15-2014, 05:15 PM
 
Location: SE Michigan
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I'm not sure what variety of Magnolia it was, but I've seen one that has been thriving for years about an hour North of Detroit. Masses of flowers. I was really surprised that they would even survive this far north.
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Old 01-17-2014, 11:52 PM
Status: "Will global warming make indianapolis the new death valley?" (set 6 days ago)
 
Location: 46060, Hardiness zone 5b/6a
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tennesseestorm View Post
I am not sure, but here in northeast Tennessee, we have Southern Magnolias that are at least 150-200 years old and have survived the winters here. Coldest ever recorded here was -21 in January of 1985, but it was very short-lived and it has been no where near that cold here since. Not sure how they would handle the long-term sub zero temps of the north.
Here in Indianapolis, I know of two specimens that apparently are still alive and have sustained some foliage burn after the two nights in early January where the air temperature went down to around -14 Degrees for two nights in a row, one of these specimens appears to have about 80 percent of its leaves burned/bronzed and or blotched. The other tree much to my surprise appears to have maybe 30 percent or so of its leaves burned or bronzed from that severe cold spell. I suspect that there will be the one with the 80 percent plus burned leaves will become quite deciduous or perhaps the Damage caused by that and subsequent cold spells the rest of this harsh winter(even by Indiana's standards), will not be fully realized until spring has sprung; I hear that even the cold tolerant varieties can become quite puny and deciduous looking after an unusually hard winter(like what Indianapolis has experienced for this year 2013-2014), and I suspect that this will be the case for the spring of 2014, I expect lots of leaf brown out and leaf drop after which the trees should fill in to replace the damaged foliage in late spring or early summer. You claim that the Southern Magnolia near you managed to survive a brief run in with 20 below zero temperatures, but I suspect that was a mature and a more established tree than these saplings, these Cold Tolerant Magnolia Grandifloras have only been there since April of 2011 if my memory is correct, so I hope these trees survive the remainder of the winter season.
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Old 01-22-2014, 11:22 AM
 
Location: Bangor Maine
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Not sure what variety they are but there are several beautiful magolia trees in the Littlefield Garden on the campus of the University of Maine in Orono. It remains to be seen if they have survived our 2 weeks of ice on the trees in Dec/Jan. We are zone 5 here.
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Old 01-23-2014, 05:11 PM
 
Location: Southern Quebec
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When we bought our house in 2010, there was a small magnolia tree on the front lawn. It's really grown since we've been here. It has gorgeous purple flowers (which sadly, don't stay in bloom long enough).

We live on the south shore from Montreal.
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Old 03-05-2014, 10:10 PM
Status: "Will global warming make indianapolis the new death valley?" (set 6 days ago)
 
Location: 46060, Hardiness zone 5b/6a
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Thanks for all of the replies, it is now March 5th and most all of the Cold Hardy Cultivars of Southern Magnolia(every tree i have seen anyways) has mostly or completely browned out and winter burned leaves, funny thing is, the trees I have inspected seem to be retaining the leaves i.e. the leaves are still firmly attached to the two trees i have contacted and touched. But I feel that as soon as that ground thaws out all the way that these trees will lose all of that winter burnt foliage and look very awkward and lopsided, if not almost completely bare and dead. I can only hope that the lows of -15 and -14 F didn't kill this supposedly cold hardy variety(Edith Bogue)of Southern Magnolia and that the leaves were just Damaged. I live in the Indianapolis area by the way, and there are perhaps a Dozen or So of these Trees in Isolated sites through out the city limits of Indianapolis
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Old 03-05-2014, 11:10 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dugan2 View Post
several decades ago remember seeing some big, beautiful southern magnolias in a house's yard located in Illinois, just a bit north and east of St. Louis. However, I never remember seeing them in St. Louis as I drove along the freeway, but they're probably here and there.
I have seen Southern Magnolias in St. Louis, though not in abundance. Indy would be a more severe climate than St. Louis, though.

These are abundant in Portland OR, which is pretty far north, but of course in a much more moderate climate than in the Midwest US.
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Old 03-05-2014, 11:11 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gardener34 View Post
Chicago we have star magnolias which survive nicely. The tulip magnolias (not sure if they are southern) are hit or miss. If you have an early warmth then a frost, all the buds form then freeze drop off. This occurs every 5 years or so.
Neither of these are Southern Magnolia.
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Old 03-06-2014, 01:49 AM
 
1,964 posts, read 2,381,785 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Isleofpalms85 View Post
Thanks for all of the replies, it is now March 5th and most all of the Cold Hardy Cultivars of Southern Magnolia(every tree i have seen anyways) has mostly or completely browned out and winter burned leaves, funny thing is, the trees I have inspected seem to be retaining the leaves i.e. the leaves are still firmly attached to the two trees i have contacted and touched. But I feel that as soon as that ground thaws out all the way that these trees will lose all of that winter burnt foliage and look very awkward and lopsided, if not almost completely bare and dead. I can only hope that the lows of -15 and -14 F didn't kill this supposedly cold hardy variety(Edith Bogue)of Southern Magnolia and that the leaves were just Damaged. I live in the Indianapolis area by the way, and there are perhaps a Dozen or So of these Trees in Isolated sites through out the city limits of Indianapolis
I would hang in there, Springtime brings leaf flush for S. magnolias and they might pull through just yet! It will be at that time when you can ascertain exactly what portions have died off.
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Old 03-06-2014, 10:05 AM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
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I know of two growing here in Denver. One is prety small, maybe 5' tall. The other is in someone's front lawn and is maybe 20' tall. The larger one has had no damage in the past 9 winters that I've lived here, but I drove by the other day and it appeard to have a little damage. We've had two long arctic air outbreaks where the temp. in the city got down to around -10 or so. But maybe the bad thing was when, in early December, the arctic air stayed for 4 days where the highs never got above 10 degrees. I've never seen the bitter cold stick around that long. There might be some branches on this tree that will need to be trimmed back once new growth begins, but I'm sure it will survive.

I grew up in Kansas City and there are some very large/old specimines there. One, in particular, has to be well over 50 years old and probably 40' tall. It's sort of protected, on the south side of a church. And there are other such specimines around KC in older neighborhoods. I do remember seeing the get a little damaged some winters, but it never killed them.
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