U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-10-2014, 06:07 PM
 
Location: Windsor Ontario
1,454 posts, read 1,209,307 times
Reputation: 1621

Advertisements

The Southern Magnolias around here are pretty browned out, but still have some green on them. This is the worst I have ever seen them this year. Most years they remain green and glossy right through winter, maybe showing some bronzing from the odd extreme cold night, this year we had multiple extreme cold events, and it shows.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-11-2014, 12:06 AM
Status: "Will global warming make indianapolis the new death valley?" (set 8 days ago)
 
Location: 46060, Hardiness zone 5b/6a
2,175 posts, read 1,570,339 times
Reputation: 710
Quote:
Originally Posted by North 42 View Post
The Southern Magnolias around here are pretty browned out, but still have some green on them. This is the worst I have ever seen them this year. Most years they remain green and glossy right through winter, maybe showing some bronzing from the odd extreme cold night, this year we had multiple extreme cold events, and it shows.
Yes, and here too in Indianapolis, such is the case with the Southern Magnolias. Upon Closer Inspection, I noted that there were some inner leaves that were still fairly green and glossy and the less exposed to the sun side of the trees had more green foliage on that side and the side facing the direct winter sun well those leaves on that side of those two trees that I inspected were completely and totally burnt and browned out. I saw what appeared to be a mature specimen of an Edith Bogue Southern Magnolia, and it appeared to have more than 50 percent of its leaves browned out and burnt and this tree was a good 30+ Feet in Height, those two Southern Magnolias I am talking about I just visited them today, and I noted that the buds were from what I could tell flexible and bendy in nature, and not brittle or stiff. I believe the two Southern Magnolia Cultivars I have been visiting for the past 3 years are in fact Bracken's Brown Beauty and not Edith Bogue as mentioned above. I believe roamin rebel has a point to hang in there, as it won't be known exactly how much damage to these Magnolias may have occurred, as this was their 3rd winter overwintering here in the ground in Indianapolis Indiana.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-12-2014, 08:02 AM
 
Location: Windsor Ontario
1,454 posts, read 1,209,307 times
Reputation: 1621
It'll be interesting to see what they look like come summer. Hopefully the only damage is to the leaves and not the branches.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-12-2014, 09:01 AM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
14,174 posts, read 22,500,688 times
Reputation: 10428
Quote:
Originally Posted by North 42 View Post
It'll be interesting to see what they look like come summer. Hopefully the only damage is to the leaves and not the branches.
From what I remember in Kansas City, there were a couple winters where the Magnolias took a hit. Once they put out new leaves, there would be a few dead branches here and there that needed to be pruned. I think the older the tree, the hardier they became.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-13-2014, 09:45 PM
Status: "Will global warming make indianapolis the new death valley?" (set 8 days ago)
 
Location: 46060, Hardiness zone 5b/6a
2,175 posts, read 1,570,339 times
Reputation: 710
Quote:
Originally Posted by denverian View Post
From what I remember in Kansas City, there were a couple winters where the Magnolias took a hit. Once they put out new leaves, there would be a few dead branches here and there that needed to be pruned. I think the older the tree, the hardier they became.
Ok, So I understand that you have been to Kansas City before and had recollections of the Southern Magnolia sustaining winter kill some years, but aren't Kansas City's Winters a bit warmer than those of Indianapolis winters, and isn't Indianapolis's overall climate just a tad bit more Continental in nature than that of Kansas City, meaning that Indianapolis winters are on average a little more severe than Kansas City's winters and summers are cooler? Yes Come this summer, I will be looking to see just how much die back has occurred if there is any to be seen at all, which at this point remains to be seen whether there is any terminal branch and bud tip damage. I agree with North 42's point in such a case.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-14-2014, 10:22 AM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
14,174 posts, read 22,500,688 times
Reputation: 10428
Quote:
Originally Posted by Isleofpalms85 View Post
Ok, So I understand that you have been to Kansas City before and had recollections of the Southern Magnolia sustaining winter kill some years, but aren't Kansas City's Winters a bit warmer than those of Indianapolis winters, and isn't Indianapolis's overall climate just a tad bit more Continental in nature than that of Kansas City, meaning that Indianapolis winters are on average a little more severe than Kansas City's winters and summers are cooler? Yes Come this summer, I will be looking to see just how much die back has occurred if there is any to be seen at all, which at this point remains to be seen whether there is any terminal branch and bud tip damage. I agree with North 42's point in such a case.
Yes, Indy is probably just a tad cooler in Winter. KC has had some extreme cold this Winter, so I'd expect damage there as well. But I noticed that they've been planting more of the evergreen Southern Magnolia's in the KC are in the past decade.

I think Indy and Denver are about the same latitude, but with our altitude, we have the potential to get well below zero. I only know of one decent looking Southern Magnolia here, and it did well the past 8 winters, but this one definitely damaged the tree. I'll keep my eye on it to see how it does. I still haven't ever seen a really big one in Denver, but have heard rumors of their existence. I still think that the more they mature, the hardier they become.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-14-2014, 07:24 PM
Status: "Will global warming make indianapolis the new death valley?" (set 8 days ago)
 
Location: 46060, Hardiness zone 5b/6a
2,175 posts, read 1,570,339 times
Reputation: 710
Quote:
Originally Posted by denverian View Post
Yes, Indy is probably just a tad cooler in Winter. KC has had some extreme cold this Winter, so I'd expect damage there as well. But I noticed that they've been planting more of the evergreen Southern Magnolia's in the KC are in the past decade.

I think Indy and Denver are about the same latitude, but with our altitude, we have the potential to get well below zero. I only know of one decent looking Southern Magnolia here, and it did well the past 8 winters, but this one definitely damaged the tree. I'll keep my eye on it to see how it does. I still haven't ever seen a really big one in Denver, but have heard rumors of their existence. I still think that the more they mature, the hardier they become.
I have noticed more people have been giving the Evergreen Southern Magnolia a try in Indianapolis as well, as I have seen perhaps a half dozen or more of young saplings within the city limits as opposed to mature sized individuals, and it looks like you are correct on size being a deterministic factor on how hardy they are, as from what I have seen as of March 9th, some tiny trees which were completely browned out and partially defoliated, where as the two or three mature and larger specimens I saw had about half of their total leaves browned out and winter burnt. There have been perhaps about a dozen trees which have been planted here in Indianapolis within the last 10 years or so, I think before the year 2000, they were much less common with only a few trees within the city limits of Indianapolis, and with the exception of this winter(coldest winter in 35 years) the winters here have overall been slightly warmer on average the the period of climate record beginning and prior to about 1997.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-16-2014, 09:38 AM
 
Location: Windsor Ontario
1,454 posts, read 1,209,307 times
Reputation: 1621
Quote:
Originally Posted by Isleofpalms85 View Post
Ok, So I understand that you have been to Kansas City before and had recollections of the Southern Magnolia sustaining winter kill some years, but aren't Kansas City's Winters a bit warmer than those of Indianapolis winters, and isn't Indianapolis's overall climate just a tad bit more Continental in nature than that of Kansas City, meaning that Indianapolis winters are on average a little more severe than Kansas City's winters and summers are cooler? Yes Come this summer, I will be looking to see just how much die back has occurred if there is any to be seen at all, which at this point remains to be seen whether there is any terminal branch and bud tip damage. I agree with North 42's point in such a case.
I would think that Kansas City would have a more continental climate than Indy, being further west into the centre of the country. I know that Chicago is more continental than here in the Windsor and Detroit area, and as a result, we are zone 6b and can grow plants that are more common to locations more south of here. I just really hope the magnolias here make it through this winter ok, as they have only been recently planted in the last 15 years or so. I would love to see them more widely planted throughout the city as they are so exotic looking with their evergreen shiny leaves!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-17-2014, 03:56 PM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
14,174 posts, read 22,500,688 times
Reputation: 10428
Quote:
Originally Posted by Isleofpalms85 View Post
I have noticed more people have been giving the Evergreen Southern Magnolia a try in Indianapolis as well, as I have seen perhaps a half dozen or more of young saplings within the city limits as opposed to mature sized individuals, and it looks like you are correct on size being a deterministic factor on how hardy they are, as from what I have seen as of March 9th, some tiny trees which were completely browned out and partially defoliated, where as the two or three mature and larger specimens I saw had about half of their total leaves browned out and winter burnt. There have been perhaps about a dozen trees which have been planted here in Indianapolis within the last 10 years or so, I think before the year 2000, they were much less common with only a few trees within the city limits of Indianapolis, and with the exception of this winter(coldest winter in 35 years) the winters here have overall been slightly warmer on average the the period of climate record beginning and prior to about 1997.
Winter lows have trended higher here in Denver too. I think we're a zone 6. Typical (at least the past 10 years) winters in the city of Denver have lows down to single digits, but rarely below zero. We had a day this winter with a high in the city of about 4 and low down to -10 or so.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-17-2014, 03:58 PM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
14,174 posts, read 22,500,688 times
Reputation: 10428
Quote:
Originally Posted by North 42 View Post
I would think that Kansas City would have a more continental climate than Indy, being further west into the centre of the country. I know that Chicago is more continental than here in the Windsor and Detroit area, and as a result, we are zone 6b and can grow plants that are more common to locations more south of here. I just really hope the magnolias here make it through this winter ok, as they have only been recently planted in the last 15 years or so. I would love to see them more widely planted throughout the city as they are so exotic looking with their evergreen shiny leaves!
KC is a little further south than Indy. Growing up in KC, it was quite unusual for it to get down below zero. I'm still amazed by some of the huge, old magnolias there. The average person probably doesn't notice or care lol! But like you, I think they're beautiful trees and amazingly hardy. Somehow they don't break apart in heavy snows. Maybe the leaves are too smooth and the snow won't stick?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top