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Old 03-17-2014, 04:12 PM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
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Apparently there is ONE rather mature Magnolia in the Denver metro area:

Southern magnolia! A tree grows in Lakewood...
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Old 03-17-2014, 10:24 PM
Status: "Will global warming make indianapolis the new death valley?" (set 7 days ago)
 
Location: 46060, Hardiness zone 5b/6a
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Quote:
Originally Posted by denverian View Post
Apparently there is ONE rather mature Magnolia in the Denver metro area:

Southern magnolia! A tree grows in Lakewood...
Parts of the Denver City Limits are indeed a warmer hardiness zone 6, up from a zone 5 20 years ago, the 2012 map shows Denver proper as a zone 5b with a few areas of zone 6a, almost the entire city limit of Indianapolis(Marion County) is hardiness zone 6a, with only the far northwestern corner of Marion County still shown as zone 5b in the 2012 usda plant hardiness zone map.
All In all though, the absolute minimum temperatures listed for the Indianapolis area for this winter were 14 below at Eagle Creek Park(Northwest Side of Indianapolis, and 15 below(Indianapolis airport on far southwest side of the city), I saw that Denver International got down to 19 below zero in February while the Centennial Airport got down to 17 below zero in February, so all in all I would say that most of Denver is still more borderline as being zone 6 than Indianapolis is, and is in fact closer to being a Zone 5 than a Zone 6, at least I think most of Denver is more 5 than 6 based on the 2012 map of Colorado, as for Indianapolis, here too we are a borderline or marginal zone 6 as the southern most regions of zone 5b hugs the far northwestern part of the city of Indianapolis and points northwestwards as well as to the north. I have at least 4 or 5 fairly mature Southern Magnolia Specimens within the city of Indianapolis, and there may actually be at least a half dozen mature trees in the city limits of Indianapolis, no offense, but being much lower in elevation, the annual average temperature in Indianapolis is slightly higher for the year as a whole despite the propensity of seeing more arctic air vulnerability and colder winters than Denver, Indianapolis summers are likely more favorable for the growth of this tree than the low humidity levels in summer in the mile high city,nevertheless, I am amazed of all the different types of trees that grow with ease in Indianapolis and in the Eastern U.S. that you wouldn't think could survive Denver's climate but yet can and do grow there.
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Old 03-18-2014, 08:54 AM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Isleofpalms85 View Post
Parts of the Denver City Limits are indeed a warmer hardiness zone 6, up from a zone 5 20 years ago, the 2012 map shows Denver proper as a zone 5b with a few areas of zone 6a, almost the entire city limit of Indianapolis(Marion County) is hardiness zone 6a, with only the far northwestern corner of Marion County still shown as zone 5b in the 2012 usda plant hardiness zone map.
All In all though, the absolute minimum temperatures listed for the Indianapolis area for this winter were 14 below at Eagle Creek Park(Northwest Side of Indianapolis, and 15 below(Indianapolis airport on far southwest side of the city), I saw that Denver International got down to 19 below zero in February while the Centennial Airport got down to 17 below zero in February, so all in all I would say that most of Denver is still more borderline as being zone 6 than Indianapolis is, and is in fact closer to being a Zone 5 than a Zone 6, at least I think most of Denver is more 5 than 6 based on the 2012 map of Colorado, as for Indianapolis, here too we are a borderline or marginal zone 6 as the southern most regions of zone 5b hugs the far northwestern part of the city of Indianapolis and points northwestwards as well as to the north. I have at least 4 or 5 fairly mature Southern Magnolia Specimens within the city of Indianapolis, and there may actually be at least a half dozen mature trees in the city limits of Indianapolis, no offense, but being much lower in elevation, the annual average temperature in Indianapolis is slightly higher for the year as a whole despite the propensity of seeing more arctic air vulnerability and colder winters than Denver, Indianapolis summers are likely more favorable for the growth of this tree than the low humidity levels in summer in the mile high city,nevertheless, I am amazed of all the different types of trees that grow with ease in Indianapolis and in the Eastern U.S. that you wouldn't think could survive Denver's climate but yet can and do grow there.
I doubt the drier air has much to do with it. I had a huge Southern Magnolia in my yard in Orange County, CA, and the climate there is about as dry as here in Denver. You see Magnilias all over Southern California, Phoenix, Las Vegas. They don't seem to be all that particular, other than getting too much below zero.

I have a thermometer at my house and the it never got that cold. I live in the city (heat island) plus, we're lower elevation than either airport. Whatever the low recorded at DIA, you can usually tack on at least 5 degrees for the low in the actual city.
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Old 03-18-2014, 02:57 PM
Status: "Will global warming make indianapolis the new death valley?" (set 7 days ago)
 
Location: 46060, Hardiness zone 5b/6a
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I don't know whether the city of Indianapolis has an UHI Effect but I am even more in awe to the fact that the Southern Magnolias can grow in the arid and hot climate of Phoenix and Las Vegas wow. I take it they grow the straight species and perhaps not the cold tolerant varieties, or correct me if I am wrong, maybe they grow both the cold tolerant cultivars and the actual parent tree, either way, I am flabbergasted that they can even grow there. Must be like in watered landscaping like a tropical paradise in Phoenix with the weather not so much being considered a paradise but like a blast furnace in summer.
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Old 03-18-2014, 04:26 PM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Isleofpalms85 View Post
I don't know whether the city of Indianapolis has an UHI Effect but I am even more in awe to the fact that the Southern Magnolias can grow in the arid and hot climate of Phoenix and Las Vegas wow. I take it they grow the straight species and perhaps not the cold tolerant varieties, or correct me if I am wrong, maybe they grow both the cold tolerant cultivars and the actual parent tree, either way, I am flabbergasted that they can even grow there. Must be like in watered landscaping like a tropical paradise in Phoenix with the weather not so much being considered a paradise but like a blast furnace in summer.
I have no clue what varieties grow in the SW. The one I had in my yard looked like any other one I've seen in the country (I'm not an expert like you!). But yes, it was watered year-round by the sprinkler system. That's a given, whether you're in Denver, L.A., Phoenix, Vegas, or San Francisco. Everything, everywhere, has underground sprinkler systems. Even the medians where vegetation grows. I doubt a Magnolia (or any other tree) would do well or grow in the SW if you never watered it. That's how you get all the tropical landscaping in SoCal In reality, even L.A. should have cactus and rock "lawns", if they just went with what the climate would support.
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Old 03-18-2014, 06:17 PM
 
1,964 posts, read 2,382,573 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by denverian View Post
I have no clue what varieties grow in the SW. The one I had in my yard looked like any other one I've seen in the country (I'm not an expert like you!). But yes, it was watered year-round by the sprinkler system. That's a given, whether you're in Denver, L.A., Phoenix, Vegas, or San Francisco. Everything, everywhere, has underground sprinkler systems. Even the medians where vegetation grows. I doubt a Magnolia (or any other tree) would do well or grow in the SW if you never watered it. That's how you get all the tropical landscaping in SoCal In reality, even L.A. should have cactus and rock "lawns", if they just went with what the climate would support.
Denverian - Around L.A. I mostly see "Little Gem" appearing in landscapes. The older, established landscapes seem to have a larger cultivar which I can't seem to nail down. They really love to cut the lower limbs in the SoCal area as opposed to in the SE where the tradition is to leave the lower limbs intact.

As far as irrigation, you're also correct, they are watered! In areas that are not watered the land in SoCal is as barren as the surface of Mars!
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Old 03-19-2014, 10:32 AM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RoaminRebel View Post
Denverian - Around L.A. I mostly see "Little Gem" appearing in landscapes. The older, established landscapes seem to have a larger cultivar which I can't seem to nail down. They really love to cut the lower limbs in the SoCal area as opposed to in the SE where the tradition is to leave the lower limbs intact.

As far as irrigation, you're also correct, they are watered! In areas that are not watered the land in SoCal is as barren as the surface of Mars!
Same thing in Denver. If you have a lawn and never water it, you'll end up with dirt! Maybe a few tumble weeds and yucca might take over lol!

I noticed, in all my years living in Orange County, that at least in SoCal, they love to over-prune all trees. Noting is left to grow in its natural state. Trees and hedges are all shaped, trimmed, pruned and hat-racked! And I knew more than one person who was afraid to let any tree get too big in their yard because they feared it would fall over on their house.
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Old 03-21-2014, 01:33 PM
Status: "Will global warming make indianapolis the new death valley?" (set 7 days ago)
 
Location: 46060, Hardiness zone 5b/6a
2,174 posts, read 1,569,145 times
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As of March 21st, the two southern magnolias that I writing about have yet to loose all of their winter burnt and tattered leaves. Does anyone on this forum know when to expect these trees to defoliate to the point of being semi-deciduous to almost completely devoid of leaves? Any and all experience and observations from past observers would be helpful and greatly appreciated.
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Old 03-29-2014, 06:36 PM
Status: "Will global warming make indianapolis the new death valley?" (set 7 days ago)
 
Location: 46060, Hardiness zone 5b/6a
2,174 posts, read 1,569,145 times
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Could somebody please tell me when exactly Southern Magnolias Flush and Defoliate their browned out/dead leaves to replace them with green and live leaves? All the Southern Magnolias here in Indianapolis have yet to lose their browned out/burnt leaves and are still all on every Southern Magnolia I Have seen in the City Of Indianapolis. I am guessing that the ground(soil) has not warmed up enough and may in fact still be frozen somewhere within their root zone, could this be why these trees haven't defoliated yet? Thanks for any and all useful information.
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Old 03-31-2014, 12:18 PM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
14,174 posts, read 22,496,291 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Isleofpalms85 View Post
Could somebody please tell me when exactly Southern Magnolias Flush and Defoliate their browned out/dead leaves to replace them with green and live leaves? All the Southern Magnolias here in Indianapolis have yet to lose their browned out/burnt leaves and are still all on every Southern Magnolia I Have seen in the City Of Indianapolis. I am guessing that the ground(soil) has not warmed up enough and may in fact still be frozen somewhere within their root zone, could this be why these trees haven't defoliated yet? Thanks for any and all useful information.
Based on what I recall seeing in Kansas City (I haven't lived there since I was 19), the brown (dead) leaves won't fall off until new growth occurs, probably in late May.
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