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Old 04-08-2014, 06:48 PM
Status: "Will global warming make indianapolis the new death valley?" (set 6 days ago)
 
Location: 46060, Hardiness zone 5b/6a
2,174 posts, read 1,567,704 times
Reputation: 710

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As of Yesterday, I drove by and stopped to take a look at the two Magnolias, and one of them has lost a considerable amount of the browned out and dead leaves while the other tree is beginning to defoliate and lose its brown burnt and dead leaves, and now on both trees the underlying still green leaves are much more visible than they were before. These two Southern Magnolias are located near a restaurant, and one is facing on a southern exposure not too far from near the windows of that restaurant while the other is situated facing east and is on the edge of that eatery's parking lot. Thank You Denverian for your helpful information and I would like to thank all the other replies for information on this thread as well. Btw the more exposed magnolia is the one that appears to be becoming more or less semi-deciduous now as of today, with more than about 75 percent of its leaves gone(the browned out leaves). It remains to be seen whether any part of either tree has been killed off by this past winter's extreme cold and record breaking snowfall in Indianapolis, Indiana, I will likely know this by Early June.
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Old 04-09-2014, 10:12 AM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
14,174 posts, read 22,492,358 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Isleofpalms85 View Post
As of Yesterday, I drove by and stopped to take a look at the two Magnolias, and one of them has lost a considerable amount of the browned out and dead leaves while the other tree is beginning to defoliate and lose its brown burnt and dead leaves, and now on both trees the underlying still green leaves are much more visible than they were before. These two Southern Magnolias are located near a restaurant, and one is facing on a southern exposure not too far from near the windows of that restaurant while the other is situated facing east and is on the edge of that eatery's parking lot. Thank You Denverian for your helpful information and I would like to thank all the other replies for information on this thread as well. Btw the more exposed magnolia is the one that appears to be becoming more or less semi-deciduous now as of today, with more than about 75 percent of its leaves gone(the browned out leaves). It remains to be seen whether any part of either tree has been killed off by this past winter's extreme cold and record breaking snowfall in Indianapolis, Indiana, I will likely know this by Early June.
I'll keep checking the one near my home here in Denver. It still has some green leaves, but I wouldn't expect any new growth to appear for at least a month.

These trees shouldn't act deciduous at all. If/when they lose leaves, it's just abnormal due to the cold, and they very well may have some dead branches. I recall the ones in Kansas City needing a pruning of dead branch "tips" after an unusually cold winter. The only time I saw any of them completely die was when they were very young, newly planted before the harsh cold hit them. The older and more established they are, the hardier they seem to become! So I guess the general rule would be, if you plant one, be prepared to try and protect it the first few winters if temps get down to the single digits or below zero.
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Old 04-10-2014, 11:26 PM
Status: "Will global warming make indianapolis the new death valley?" (set 6 days ago)
 
Location: 46060, Hardiness zone 5b/6a
2,174 posts, read 1,567,704 times
Reputation: 710
Quote:
Originally Posted by denverian View Post
I'll keep checking the one near my home here in Denver. It still has some green leaves, but I wouldn't expect any new growth to appear for at least a month.

These trees shouldn't act deciduous at all. If/when they lose leaves, it's just abnormal due to the cold, and they very well may have some dead branches. I recall the ones in Kansas City needing a pruning of dead branch "tips" after an unusually cold winter. The only time I saw any of them completely die was when they were very young, newly planted before the harsh cold hit them. The older and more established they are, the hardier they seem to become! So I guess the general rule would be, if you plant one, be prepared to try and protect it the first few winters if temps get down to the single digits or below zero.
The Southern Magnolias that endured this long hard winter in(3rd year overwintering the first two winters they were there were MUCH Milder than this past winter was), and I will keep your information in mind that they just might be on the verge of croaking and may not even put on new growth at all, but again, Thank you Denverian for your advice and observations of these trees in a climate similar to Indianapolis' climate.
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Old 04-11-2014, 03:28 AM
 
4,239 posts, read 3,310,990 times
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Why care about the Southern magnolia when there are now so many cold tolerant, beautiful and smaller magnolia on the market?

I live outside Boston, and I planted two Stars, two Janes, a Black tulip, a Butterflies, and a Soulangiana on my property. They are all doing great and finally ready to open with just few more warm days....finally. The Southern Magnolia is just too big, and once grown, how do you even see the flower when they are so high up?
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Old 04-11-2014, 09:58 AM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
14,174 posts, read 22,492,358 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pennyone View Post
Why care about the Southern magnolia when there are now so many cold tolerant, beautiful and smaller magnolia on the market?

I live outside Boston, and I planted two Stars, two Janes, a Black tulip, a Butterflies, and a Soulangiana on my property. They are all doing great and finally ready to open with just few more warm days....finally. The Southern Magnolia is just too big, and once grown, how do you even see the flower when they are so high up?
I think they're beautiful and unusual trees. Unusual in that they have such thick, glossy leaves and are evergreen. And they're extremely hardy and a surprise to see in colder climates where all the other trees are bare in winter. I don't find deciduous Magnolia varieties to be very interesting since they look like any other tree in winter and the leaves aren't very different from other deciduous trees.
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Old 04-12-2014, 05:43 AM
 
Location: Copenhagen, Denmark
9,864 posts, read 8,000,104 times
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The Magnolia trees in Denmark are just starting to blossom!
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Old 04-18-2014, 07:48 PM
 
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Isleofpalms85, I also live in Indianapolis and have a Southern Magnolia. Mine is an unknown cultivar bought in TN 11 yrs ago; it is about 18 ft tall and has bloomed the past two summers. It was about 70% defoliated maybe 5 winters ago, but this year is 95% gone, with only a few greenish leaves left near the top of the tree. IIRC, the magnolias that went through the -20 temps in TN in '85 did not come out until well into May, but all those I was familiar with survived. I only know of 3 others in the Indy area; one on S. Meridian, one on Washington Blvd, and another in Carmel. Where are some others? Also, I found this forum while trying to find where a large magnolia is in Greenfield - heard about it last fall.
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Old 04-18-2014, 08:36 PM
Status: "Will global warming make indianapolis the new death valley?" (set 6 days ago)
 
Location: 46060, Hardiness zone 5b/6a
2,174 posts, read 1,567,704 times
Reputation: 710
Quote:
Originally Posted by IndTenn View Post
Isleofpalms85, I also live in Indianapolis and have a Southern Magnolia. Mine is an unknown cultivar bought in TN 11 yrs ago; it is about 18 ft tall and has bloomed the past two summers. It was about 70% defoliated maybe 5 winters ago, but this year is 95% gone, with only a few greenish leaves left near the top of the tree. IIRC, the magnolias that went through the -20 temps in TN in '85 did not come out until well into May, but all those I was familiar with survived. I only know of 3 others in the Indy area; one on S. Meridian, one on Washington Blvd, and another in Carmel. Where are some others? Also, I found this forum while trying to find where a large magnolia is in Greenfield - heard about it last fall.
There are two young southern magnolias near little maggiano's bar and grill at keystone at the crossing, these are maybe 10 to 12 feet tall, and then there are a couple more off of or not far from the intersections of 56th street and kessler and grandview blvd on the city's northwest side, there are 3 fairly large trees(probably about 15 feet tall) at the Indianapolis Museum of Art, I have seen isolated and very sporadic cases of new trees being planted within the city limits of Indianapolis the last several years at least since around 2010 or 2011. IndTenn, Thank You for the useful information in regard to actually expect these trees to come out of it.

Last edited by Isleofpalms85; 04-18-2014 at 08:58 PM..
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Old 04-29-2014, 07:27 PM
 
3 posts, read 13,515 times
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I live just east of Indianapolis and have several magnolias. DD Blanchard, Little Gem,Edith Bouge, Brackins BB and Teddy Bear. Also two unknown variety. Oldest has been in ground 15 years. All received major bronzing and are nearly deciduous. Have to wait a few more weeks to know damage or die back. Hopeful but realistic, have not been through a winter even close to this one
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Old 05-01-2014, 04:28 AM
Status: "Will global warming make indianapolis the new death valley?" (set 6 days ago)
 
Location: 46060, Hardiness zone 5b/6a
2,174 posts, read 1,567,704 times
Reputation: 710
Quote:
Originally Posted by indybryan View Post
I live just east of Indianapolis and have several magnolias. DD Blanchard, Little Gem,Edith Bouge, Brackins BB and Teddy Bear. Also two unknown variety. Oldest has been in ground 15 years. All received major bronzing and are nearly deciduous. Have to wait a few more weeks to know damage or die back. Hopeful but realistic, have not been through a winter even close to this one
whoa, those are a lot of different types you've got there of the southern magnolia cultivars, the only cultivars that I have seen sold at local the local nursery has been the edith bogue, brackens brown beauty, and the d.d. blanchard, please P.M. me or reply to this thread to let me know which cultivars died and which weathered the winter the best as soon as you know the extent of the damage.
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