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Old 06-04-2014, 06:56 PM
 
Location: Windsor Ontario
1,455 posts, read 1,210,208 times
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Just checked the largest Southern Mag in the city here, and it's buds are swelling despite being almost completely defoliated. Just so happy it's alive and well!
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Old 06-04-2014, 08:01 PM
 
Location: Mass
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Not sure what this variety is - but, it was a showstopper this year!

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Old 06-05-2014, 10:29 AM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
14,174 posts, read 22,505,000 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by North 42 View Post
The ones here look terrible, mostly bare! I need to get a closer look to see if there are buds growing. I just walked by some big, older mimosas trees here today, and they also looked dead, but when i looked closer, i could see new shoots throughout the tree.

I know that there are Southern Mags growing in Niagara, which is further north than us, but also a 6b location.
I forgot about Mimosas. I've only seen one here in Denver, at the Botanic Gardens. I love them, but then can also be a nuisance, IIRC. I remeber my grandparents had one in their back yard and my grandfather would chop it to the ground, then it was back up by the end of the summer. In Kansas City, they'd get killed back every few years, then grow again.
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Old 06-06-2014, 09:08 AM
 
Location: CO
2,456 posts, read 2,440,121 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by denverian View Post
I just noticed yesterday that someone in my neighborhood planted a small southern Magnolia in their front yard. Maybe 4' high. I'm wondering where they bought it, and if they know it could be difficult to grow here, if not a very hardy variety.
I'd be very surprised if they could buy that Southern Magnolia anywhere in Denver, but who knows? It'll be interesting to watch anyway.

Quote:
Originally Posted by denverian View Post
I forgot about Mimosas. I've only seen one here in Denver, at the Botanic Gardens. I love them, but then can also be a nuisance, IIRC. I remeber my grandparents had one in their back yard and my grandfather would chop it to the ground, then it was back up by the end of the summer. In Kansas City, they'd get killed back every few years, then grow again.
There's a little-known one at E. Arapahoe Rd. and S. Franklin in Centennial. The garden guys on the radio (Keith and Jim) mention it every once in awhile. I've often wondered if the homeowners know what they have.
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Old 06-06-2014, 01:08 PM
 
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Not sure if this is relevant, but the Sweetbay Magnolia is native along the Atlantic Coastal Plain up to central New Jersey. I have seen them in numerous places around my area of Southern NJ and my parents have a ginormous one (at least 20 ft tall) that blooms beautifully and you can smell the fragrance all across the yard. I love these trees.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnolia_virginiana
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Old 06-06-2014, 01:54 PM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
14,174 posts, read 22,505,000 times
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Originally Posted by Lost Roses View Post
I'd be very surprised if they could buy that Southern Magnolia anywhere in Denver, but who knows? It'll be interesting to watch anyway.



There's a little-known one at E. Arapahoe Rd. and S. Franklin in Centennial. The garden guys on the radio (Keith and Jim) mention it every once in awhile. I've often wondered if the homeowners know what they have.

I just looked it up on Googlemaps and sure enough, there's a Mimosa at that corner, in full bloom. I'm sure it's been killed back though since it's more of a huge shrub than a tree.

There's a Magnolia guy down in Colorado Springs that grows and sells them, and he breeds them to be cold hardy. Maybe they got it there? I figured I'd check City Floral to see if they have any since they're the only place around here that sells odd plants. They had some nice Rhododendrums for sale a couple years ago, which are hard to grow here. But I know where a few are and they're looking nice, in full bloom right now. I'd get one if I had a place to put one!
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Old 06-12-2014, 08:06 AM
 
Location: Windsor Ontario
1,455 posts, read 1,210,208 times
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Just checked the Southern Mags here, and they're all growing lots of new leaves with very little if any dieback, so happy!
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Old 06-21-2014, 12:56 AM
Status: "Will global warming make indianapolis the new death valley?" (set 9 days ago)
 
Location: 46060, Hardiness zone 5b/6a
2,177 posts, read 1,571,793 times
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Just Checked out the Two Bracken's Brown Beauties near the restaurant here in Indianapolis,as of June 19th, and they both have and are still continuing to put on new leaves and growth, albeit both trees still have a somewhat sparse canopy of leaves; probably owes to the fact that they both lost almost all of their leaves earlier this year, approximately Mid April or so, I would venture to guess that they may not regain their full canopy of foliage, at least not this year; there are rumors going around that this next winter could be a warm winter in Indiana, so we shall see if this mild winter happens; perhaps by next summer these trees will have regained their full evergreen glossy canopy of leaves by the end of next summer. One of these saplings appears to have very little if any die-back on its branches and or only has a couple of dead branches which are well concealed because of being much smaller that the adjacent branches, the other sapling specimen has about 6 inches of die-back at the top of the tree as well as a couple of dead branches interspersed in a few random spots of this sapling; the 1st tree already had a several white flowers bloom and still has lots of flower buds which will soon be blooming; the other has a lot of flower buds also but had maybe two white blooming flowers so far as of June 19th. Also, I observed the status of an Edith Bogue Southern Magnolia just a bit further north of Indianapolis, in a northern suburban plant nursery, and this observation was taken about June 16th This tree was still apparently putting on new leaves and its leaves were still not completely unfurled as much as the Bracken's Brown Beauty Magnolias down in Indianapolis; the Edith Bogue had perhaps 6 to 8 inches of die back on portions of the top of that tree and Did NOT LOOK as Well off as the Bracken's Brown Beauty trees that I saw In Indianapolis, also to note, this tree has yet to produce any flowers as of the last week that I saw it, Also to note, a Local Nursery in Indianapolis(2 Different Nurseries in 2014 actually, are selling the Bracken's Brown Beauty Magnolia, and 1 Nursery is selling the Edith Bogue Magnolia in Indianapolis, Indiana, both cultivars managed to survive, even if with dieback or damage the 8th coldest winter in recorded history in Indianapolis and the coldest winter since 1978-79' as well as the snowiest winter on record in the city of Indianapolis, so I suppose these two cultivars of Southern Magnolia probably stand the best chance of surviving Indianapolis' winters

Last edited by Isleofpalms85; 06-21-2014 at 01:12 AM..
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Old 06-23-2014, 09:32 AM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
14,174 posts, read 22,505,000 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Isleofpalms85 View Post
Just Checked out the Two Bracken's Brown Beauties near the restaurant here in Indianapolis,as of June 19th, and they both have and are still continuing to put on new leaves and growth, albeit both trees still have a somewhat sparse canopy of leaves; probably owes to the fact that they both lost almost all of their leaves earlier this year, approximately Mid April or so, I would venture to guess that they may not regain their full canopy of foliage, at least not this year; there are rumors going around that this next winter could be a warm winter in Indiana, so we shall see if this mild winter happens; perhaps by next summer these trees will have regained their full evergreen glossy canopy of leaves by the end of next summer. One of these saplings appears to have very little if any die-back on its branches and or only has a couple of dead branches which are well concealed because of being much smaller that the adjacent branches, the other sapling specimen has about 6 inches of die-back at the top of the tree as well as a couple of dead branches interspersed in a few random spots of this sapling; the 1st tree already had a several white flowers bloom and still has lots of flower buds which will soon be blooming; the other has a lot of flower buds also but had maybe two white blooming flowers so far as of June 19th. Also, I observed the status of an Edith Bogue Southern Magnolia just a bit further north of Indianapolis, in a northern suburban plant nursery, and this observation was taken about June 16th This tree was still apparently putting on new leaves and its leaves were still not completely unfurled as much as the Bracken's Brown Beauty Magnolias down in Indianapolis; the Edith Bogue had perhaps 6 to 8 inches of die back on portions of the top of that tree and Did NOT LOOK as Well off as the Bracken's Brown Beauty trees that I saw In Indianapolis, also to note, this tree has yet to produce any flowers as of the last week that I saw it, Also to note, a Local Nursery in Indianapolis(2 Different Nurseries in 2014 actually, are selling the Bracken's Brown Beauty Magnolia, and 1 Nursery is selling the Edith Bogue Magnolia in Indianapolis, Indiana, both cultivars managed to survive, even if with dieback or damage the 8th coldest winter in recorded history in Indianapolis and the coldest winter since 1978-79' as well as the snowiest winter on record in the city of Indianapolis, so I suppose these two cultivars of Southern Magnolia probably stand the best chance of surviving Indianapolis' winters
I still need to swing by the one I know of here in Denver and see how it's doing. I'm sure it's growing leaves, but wondering if any branches were killed. As I posted above, someone in my neighborhood planted a small Magnolia recently, so I'm wondering if they even know what they have.

It sounds like they're expecting a very strong "El Nino" this winter, which should give most of the country a break after last winter.
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Old 06-23-2014, 11:06 AM
 
Location: SC
2,967 posts, read 3,957,990 times
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There is a small town in NE Ohio called "Magnolia" Ohio. Lots of magnolias grow along the streets in that town. Ohio is about as far north as you can get before landing in Canada.
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