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Old 08-11-2014, 06:29 AM
B87
 
Location: Norwich, UK
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Outside of the US, they grow well here at 51N.
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Old 08-11-2014, 12:08 PM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Isleofpalms85 View Post
I suppose all that heavy snow must have not had an insulating effect, either that or this past winter was more severe than it was in the Denver areaany who, I know of perhaps a few tiny practically seedling magnolia trees that died during the past winter in Indianapolis, meaning they were dug up for dying off completely, you seem to be right on the money on the larger and older, the hardier they become because I know of a large Edith Bogue that got through this past winter with perhaps roughly 60 percent leaf burn and leaf drop- a lot less than the two still relatively young Bracken's Brown Beauties mentioned near a local restaurant that I have been keeping track of since April 2011.
Denver was west of all the arctic air most of the winter, other than two "outbreaks" where it backed into Colorado. But both times it was pretty bad. I have some bamboo that was killed back almost to the ground, but it's doing ok now. Rose bushes had a lot of damage too. But all my Boxwood did just fine. I guess Boxwood is extremely hardy, for a broadleafe evergreen.
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Old 09-03-2014, 09:26 PM
Status: "Will global warming make indianapolis the new death valley?" (set 9 days ago)
 
Location: 46060, Hardiness zone 5b/6a
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Ok, well it appears that the new leaf production has pretty much ceased for the season on the two Brackens Brown Beauties near that restaurant, I just discovered two more southern magnolias within the city limits of indianapolis, one had winter sun and wind and was receiving extra water through a sprinkler system and was well mulched while the other southern magnolia appeared to just left in the ground with no mulch or additional water other than natural rainfall and it was situated in an exposed location other than perhaps some if not limited protection from winter sun and no protection from winter winds, these two magnolias appeared to be relatively mature, I dont know what cultivar they are but I suspect that the southern magnolia with the extra water, mulch and siting near the north side of a Hotel building is a less hardy cultivar than the two brackens near a restaurant a few miles away, I suspect it might be a D.D. Blanchards southern magnolia, anyway, it is in MUCH poorer shape than the other three southern magnolias in indianapolis I would say easily 6 to 10 inches twig die back on some branches while other branches appeared to be completely dead unlike all of the either edith bogues or brackens brown beauties, this southern magnolia appears it didnt flower at all this season and it appears it only put on a few inches of new terminal twig and branch growth all season long in addition to having a very sparse leaf canopy, so I could definitely tell that this southern magnolia was definitely of the less hardy variety here In indianapolis.
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Old 11-17-2014, 09:34 AM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
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For your interest, I just returned from Kansas City and I saw many healthy, green southern Magnolias around the city. Looks like the cold winter last year didn't bother them a bit in KC.

It's interesting to see old Magnolias I remember as a child that were rather small. Now they're shade trees!
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Old 11-17-2014, 10:48 AM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
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denverian, well this month's ice cold weather in Denver will probably put the final nails in the coffin of the Denver magnolias.

I tried growing a photinia bush in the ground when I lived in Chicago. It didn't make the winter...
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Old 11-17-2014, 11:35 AM
Status: "Will global warming make indianapolis the new death valley?" (set 9 days ago)
 
Location: 46060, Hardiness zone 5b/6a
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DougStark View Post
denverian, well this month's ice cold weather in Denver will probably put the final nails in the coffin of the Denver magnolias.

I tried growing a photinia bush in the ground when I lived in Chicago. It didn't make the winter...
Photinias will not survive in temperatures below zero, cold hardy cultivars of southern magnolias can and do survive sub zero temperatures.
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Old 11-19-2014, 04:45 PM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
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The furthest north I've ever seen Southern magnolias is St. Louis. Very nice, full trees. The post re: seeing them in Kansas City surprised me.

We can grow them here in hot Phoenix, but the biggest problem growing them here is chlorosis/ nutritional problems due to the alkaline soil/water here.
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Old 11-24-2014, 10:25 AM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DougStark View Post
denverian, well this month's ice cold weather in Denver will probably put the final nails in the coffin of the Denver magnolias.

I tried growing a photinia bush in the ground when I lived in Chicago. It didn't make the winter...
If we have any more extreme cold in Denver, you're probably right. One of my neighbors planted one last Spring and I'd say it's only about 3' tall. It still has leaves, but they looked a little burned. Makes me wonder if they even know how sensitive it is because they could have easily dumped leaves on it and covered it with a trash can for the coldest day/night we had last week. I was out of town, so not sure how bad the cold was. I see a little leaf burn on my Holly tree that's about 5' tall. It'll be ok though.

The tallest Magnolia near my home in Denver took a bad hit last winter and while it's still alive and had new growth over the summer, it wasn't as full as it used to be.
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Old 11-24-2014, 10:30 AM
 
Location: Denver, Colorado U.S.A.
14,174 posts, read 22,505,000 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DougStark View Post
The furthest north I've ever seen Southern magnolias is St. Louis. Very nice, full trees. The post re: seeing them in Kansas City surprised me.

We can grow them here in hot Phoenix, but the biggest problem growing them here is chlorosis/ nutritional problems due to the alkaline soil/water here.
I'm surprised they do well in KC too, but there are many around the metro area. They are typically planted in somewhat protected areas like courtyards or near houses.

Below link is an example of what you'll find around the KC area:

https://www.google.com/maps/@38.9567...PeNK_SMf-Q!2e0

Notice that it's in a corner of this building and somewhat sheltered, but still has grown quite tall. I remember this tree in the '80s and it was half as tall back then.
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Old 11-24-2014, 11:14 AM
 
Location: Floribama
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I don't think I'd want one growing up against my foundation like that, their roots can get huge.
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