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Old 11-07-2013, 06:02 PM
Status: "Will global warming make indianapolis the new death valley?" (set 5 days ago)
 
Location: 46060, Hardiness zone 5b/6a
2,174 posts, read 1,567,704 times
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Would like to know how far north in the U.S. can cold tolerant varieties of Southern Magnolias have been seen growing. I personally have seen a handful of cold tolerant varieties such as Edith Bogues and Brackens Browns Beauty growing with in the city of Indianapolis, Indiana, and this spring a few local nurseries were even selling them especially the Edith Bogue Southern Magnolia. So what is the farthest north you have seen them growing or have personally successfully cultivated/overwintered one?
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Old 11-07-2013, 07:26 PM
 
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FWIW, Guy Sternberg in his book "native trees for north American gardens" indicates that the variety "24 below" had survived in good shape for several seasons at least in central Illinois. there have been discussions about the tree doing well in sheltered spots near the coast in southern Massachusetts (even further north but with potentially somewhat more moderate temps than more interior areas from the oceanic influence). would imagine that in all cases, the tree (and any broadleaf evergreen tree) in cold winter areas would benefit from protection against cold winter winds by planting in wind protected areas, mulching around the base to protect the roots, and in certain cases providing some sort of "igloo" shelter during the coldest spells to completely cover young and newly planted trees. some people have used traditional incandescent Christmas tree lights to provide additional warmth at the same time!!!! additionally, selecting cold tolerant selections like the ones you mentioned is probably also a very good idea. hope this is of some interest and use.

Last edited by georgeinbandonoregon; 11-07-2013 at 07:43 PM.. Reason: punctuation changes.
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Old 11-11-2013, 01:22 PM
 
Location: Windsor Ontario
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We have a few growing here in Windsor, just across the river from Detroit. Some are more than 15ft tall, and do not defoliate at all in the winter, not sure which variety they are though. We are zone 6b. They also grow well in Niagara.
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Old 11-11-2013, 01:56 PM
 
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The whole State of Delaware has magnolia trees, which thrive. Magnolia, Delaware has many, many, coming and going through the town, which is in mid-Delaware.
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Old 11-11-2013, 02:24 PM
 
Location: Aiken, South Carolina, US of A
1,752 posts, read 3,619,409 times
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My daughter had a very big SOuthern magnolia tree (at least 20 ft), growing
in Warminster, PA. Zone 6. No protection right next to a very busy highway.
It was beautiful, don't know what kind it was, but definately southern. Evergreen.
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Old 01-05-2014, 06:18 PM
 
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Default southern magnolias far north

several decades ago remember seeing some big, beautiful southern magnolias in a house's yard located in Illinois, just a bit north and east of St. Louis. However, I never remember seeing them in St. Louis as I drove along the freeway, but they're probably here and there.
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Old 01-05-2014, 06:41 PM
 
Location: Long Island
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I know of two on Long Island (NY). One of my sellers had one well over 20 ft tall and another about 15 ft, which she said she started from a branch of the larger one; she was very proud of them and knew they were rare in our area. In fact, some garden guru told her there were no others anywhere nearby.
They do not drop their leaves and are magnificent to look at even without the beautiful flowers.
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Old 01-09-2014, 08:36 PM
 
Location: Northeast Tennessee
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I am not sure, but here in northeast Tennessee, we have Southern Magnolias that are at least 150-200 years old and have survived the winters here. Coldest ever recorded here was -21 in January of 1985, but it was very short-lived and it has been no where near that cold here since. Not sure how they would handle the long-term sub zero temps of the north.
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Old 01-12-2014, 04:19 PM
 
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Chicago we have star magnolias which survive nicely. The tulip magnolias (not sure if they are southern) are hit or miss. If you have an early warmth then a frost, all the buds form then freeze drop off. This occurs every 5 years or so.
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Old 01-12-2014, 09:42 PM
 
1,964 posts, read 2,381,785 times
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I don't doubt there are cultivars that live if not thrive in northern latitudes. however, I would be concerned how the long, low hanging limbs would fare in a heavy snowfall. In NC these happen occasionally the limbs have to be dusted off so they don't break. Although there seem to be many trees that have fared well despite these occasional snow/ice storms, mine included. I would also add I maintain the lower limbs on mine in the proper Southern fashion..

I would be sure to maintain a nice, strong central leader through strategic pruning if I were raising it from a sapling. I have seen some very old, magnificent S. magnolias with co-dominant leaders split right in two following snow storms or hurricanes.

Quote:
Chicago we have star magnolias which survive nicely. The tulip magnolias (not sure if they are southern) are hit or miss. If you have an early warmth then a frost, all the buds form then freeze drop off. This occurs every 5 years or so.
I believe what you are referring to are deciduous magnolias which are also quite attractive in the Spring. I have a great example down by a creek which was planted probably 50-60 years ago and produces nice, pink and white blooms in the spring. This thread is about Magnolia Grandiflora.
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