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Old 05-09-2014, 09:30 AM
 
Location: Dallas
5,461 posts, read 4,577,627 times
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I'm originally from CT, and mountain laurel is our state flower. In the springtime, there are vast expanses of them in bloom. So beautiful!
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Old 05-09-2014, 10:26 AM
 
Location: Logan Township, Minnesota
15,511 posts, read 12,506,822 times
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Originally Posted by aquietpath View Post
I'm originally from CT, and mountain laurel is our state flower. In the springtime, there are vast expanses of them in bloom. So beautiful!
I pretty much grew up in the Simsbury, Granby, Hartland area. I remember the woods being filled with them in the spring time.
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Old 05-09-2014, 10:53 AM
 
4,748 posts, read 6,146,270 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Woodrow LI View Post
I'll trade you 2 Blizzards for one Bradford pear.
Ah, no thanks, I'll keep the Bradford pears.

It's true we don't have much trouble with them splitting from ice or snow here (although we have had a couple of small ice storms and one huge snowfall since we've been here....well, huge for us....it was about 6-8 inches).. Mine are pretty old and don't have that icky round ball shape that most do. The only thing is that the person who planted them planted 4 in a square....and one died. You can see this if you look closely at the picture I posted.

They are also getting some fire blight. Hopefully I'll be out of this big old house before they have to be cut down!

That picture was taken after an afternoon rainstorm, when the sun came out and "glowed" on them from the west. It was a lovely sight, and translated pretty well to the photo.
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Old 05-09-2014, 11:23 AM
 
Location: South Central Texas
114,037 posts, read 52,362,745 times
Reputation: 161819
Quote:
Originally Posted by no kudzu View Post
Wow not the mountain laurel I'm familiar with. Since it is poisonous I haven't ever grown it.

Kalmia latifolia
It appears both plants we're speaking of are poisonous.
Quote:
Originally Posted by no kudzu View Post
I certainly wasn't directing this post to anybody in particular. I'm just constantly being reminded of how different terms are used in different parts of the country.
I understood that and agree with you.
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Old 05-09-2014, 11:42 AM
 
Location: South Central Texas
114,037 posts, read 52,362,745 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beachmel View Post
I love it! Yes, it's hard...once you start growing plants from seeds, to not try EVERYTHING! Over the years, there aren't too many things I haven't started from seed (or tried), taken cuttings from, tried transplanting, etc. Sometimes you win, sometimes.....not so much!

You mark everything...and even that's not a guarantee, because yes....permanent markers are not always permanent. Last year, my grandson (WHY? lol) "gathered" my plant labels from a couple of the flats of seedlings for me. Bless-his-heart. "Gramma....look, I got these for you." Oh dear heavens. LOL Thank goodness they were plants which WERE simple to identify from each other.

It's easy to do. I mean...it's not like we don't have anything else taking up space in our heads, right?
LOL! Yes, yes, plus we have the two grand girls living with us for a period of time. Mom and Dad are looking for a house. Then there's the Catahoula Leopard dog we've taken as our own. Known for eating houses. It's true!

I understand peoples concerns (over invasives) but under our drought conditions... I don't see anything being too prolific here.
Texas Mountain Laurels do scatter seedlings everywhere around them. I've not seen that with Mimosa's here maybe it's too dry. I have grapefruit and orange seeds to plant and may try avocado again. I have wildflower seed as well. Veggie seeds will go unplanted until i have a raised garden. Too many things to do and too little time. I've lost one of my cutting and plant donators. But, I'm generous with cuttings and full plants so are others here.
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Old 05-09-2014, 04:47 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
31,165 posts, read 57,288,199 times
Reputation: 52030
Quote:
Originally Posted by Woodrow LI View Post
Until I read this thread and discovered what a pest they are.
It's a shame they're so fragile, because they're beautiful trees.

Quote:
I'll trade you 2 Blizzards for one Bradford pear.
Hmmm ... Cleanup is probably about the same hassle ...
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Old 05-09-2014, 06:30 PM
 
Location: Western Washington
8,004 posts, read 9,653,945 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SATX56 View Post
LOL! Yes, yes, plus we have the two grand girls living with us for a period of time. Mom and Dad are looking for a house. Then there's the Catahoula Leopard dog we've taken as our own. Known for eating houses. It's true!

I understand peoples concerns (over invasives) but under our drought conditions... I don't see anything being too prolific here.
Texas Mountain Laurels do scatter seedlings everywhere around them. I've not seen that with Mimosa's here maybe it's too dry. I have grapefruit and orange seeds to plant and may try avocado again. I have wildflower seed as well. Veggie seeds will go unplanted until i have a raised garden. Too many things to do and too little time. I've lost one of my cutting and plant donators. But, I'm generous with cuttings and full plants so are others here.

LOL..... SEE!!?? This is why we gardeners have to be NICE to each other. Just look at all the malarky we go through! Yes, dear grandson lives with us as well and he IS getting much, much better.....as is the 4-legged child, who is 1-1/2 yrs old. Last year, he enjoyed more strawberries than us 2-legged kids! Hopefully, since I have 5x as many plants this year...either he'll leave them alone, or there'll be enough for ALL of us.

Running out of room quickly here, both in the greenhouse and in the gardens and thinking the rototiller is definitely going to have to come out to play. Momma needa a couple of new raised beds, sure am glad I have wiped out the compost piles yet. I've still got a dozen pumpkin plants to put in, 10 summer squash, 24 Delicata, at least 24 toms that need homes still, both Rutgers and Bushsteaks, lots of cauliflower and cukes to get in still....as well as lots of Nasturtiums, a couple of flats of trailing mixed lobelia, black swan poppies and a whole mess of cammomile and calendula plants. Gotsta grow a few of the drying herbs.

Looks like I'll be hunting down some neighbors and workmates who need some starts!
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Old 05-09-2014, 11:05 PM
 
23,903 posts, read 31,130,282 times
Reputation: 28539
Quote:
Originally Posted by Woodrow LI View Post
Odd, I was under the impression that Bradford pears were sterile and non fruiting.

Until I read this thread and discovered what a pest they are.


I think ND is one of the few States they don't grow well in. They are hardy in Zones 5-8 most of ND is 2 and 3 Warmest spots are 4

I'll trade you 2 Blizzards for one Bradford pear.
You really don't want this tree. It is the most likely tree to get taken out by wind. Never mind the smell and the babies.

I Just Hate Bradford Pears! | Your Hub for Southern Culture

Growing The Home Garden: Why You Shouldn't Plant a Bradford Pear Tree But Some People Do Anyway

Bradford Pear Tree (To plant or not to plant)

OUTDOORS: Bradford pear not as pretty as it seems | Albany Herald



The same branch structure that makes that rounded canopy shape so pleasing, with branches angled sharply upward from the trunk (called a narrow or tight crotch angle), is simply not as strong as it would be if those branches were closer to horizontal. This structural weakness makes the trees very susceptible to storm damage, whether from wind or from ice, and the damage often causes large limbs to rip down one side of the trunk, leaving the homeowner with a lopsided tree that destroys their carefully cultivated symmetry.

Structural weakness is not the only drawback associated with Bradford pears, though. Originally bred to be sterile, this ornamental pear tree was never intended to produce fruit. In reality, though, it is often pollinated by newer Callery pear cultivars (“Aristocrat,” ‘Chanticleer,” “Cleveland Select,” and “Redspire”) that were developed to overcome some of the Bradford’s structural issues. This cross-pollination can lead to viable seeds, and that’s where the real trouble starts. The offspring of those well-mannered ornamental pears are, to put it nicely, aggressive thugs. They spread rapidly with the help of birds dropping their seeds, and the resulting plants are thorny invaders, choking out native wildlife habitat wherever the seedlings take hold. The problem is severe enough that many localities have banned the Bradford pear altogether in certain settings.

If all this weren’t discouraging enough, Bradford pears just don’t live a long time, as trees go. Starting around the age of 20, the trees simply begin to decline, with few of them living past the age of 30.
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Old 05-10-2014, 12:05 AM
 
Location: South Central Texas
114,037 posts, read 52,362,745 times
Reputation: 161819
Quote:
Originally Posted by beachmel View Post
LOL..... SEE!!?? This is why we gardeners have to be NICE to each other. Just look at all the malarky we go through! Yes, dear grandson lives with us as well and he IS getting much, much better.....as is the 4-legged child, who is 1-1/2 yrs old. Last year, he enjoyed more strawberries than us 2-legged kids! Hopefully, since I have 5x as many plants this year...either he'll leave them alone, or there'll be enough for ALL of us.

Running out of room quickly here, both in the greenhouse and in the gardens and thinking the rototiller is definitely going to have to come out to play. Momma needa a couple of new raised beds, sure am glad I have wiped out the compost piles yet. I've still got a dozen pumpkin plants to put in, 10 summer squash, 24 Delicata, at least 24 toms that need homes still, both Rutgers and Bushsteaks, lots of cauliflower and cukes to get in still....as well as lots of Nasturtiums, a couple of flats of trailing mixed lobelia, black swan poppies and a whole mess of cammomile and calendula plants. Gotsta grow a few of the drying herbs.

Looks like I'll be hunting down some neighbors and workmates who need some starts!
Sharing information is what it's all about. Plants too sometimes. I'm afraid my little operation has to make do with commercial amendments. I can hardly find time or a place for my mostly portable plants as it is. My Catahoula Leopard which i love is as bad as the kids old black lab. My backyard has been turned into a barren wasteland in a few short months. Bomb craters to boot. My crates of seedlings were attacked early on before I found shelter for them. I generally grow lots of starts so i can share.
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Old 05-10-2014, 08:09 AM
 
Location: Logan Township, Minnesota
15,511 posts, read 12,506,822 times
Reputation: 7377
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChessieMom View Post
You really don't want this tree. It is the most likely tree to get taken out by wind. Never mind the smell and the babies.

I Just Hate Bradford Pears! | Your Hub for Southern Culture

Growing The Home Garden: Why You Shouldn't Plant a Bradford Pear Tree But Some People Do Anyway

Bradford Pear Tree (To plant or not to plant)

OUTDOORS: Bradford pear not as pretty as it seems | Albany Herald



The same branch structure that makes that rounded canopy shape so pleasing, with branches angled sharply upward from the trunk (called a narrow or tight crotch angle), is simply not as strong as it would be if those branches were closer to horizontal. This structural weakness makes the trees very susceptible to storm damage, whether from wind or from ice, and the damage often causes large limbs to rip down one side of the trunk, leaving the homeowner with a lopsided tree that destroys their carefully cultivated symmetry.

Structural weakness is not the only drawback associated with Bradford pears, though. Originally bred to be sterile, this ornamental pear tree was never intended to produce fruit. In reality, though, it is often pollinated by newer Callery pear cultivars (“Aristocrat,” ‘Chanticleer,” “Cleveland Select,” and “Redspire”) that were developed to overcome some of the Bradford’s structural issues. This cross-pollination can lead to viable seeds, and that’s where the real trouble starts. The offspring of those well-mannered ornamental pears are, to put it nicely, aggressive thugs. They spread rapidly with the help of birds dropping their seeds, and the resulting plants are thorny invaders, choking out native wildlife habitat wherever the seedlings take hold. The problem is severe enough that many localities have banned the Bradford pear altogether in certain settings.

If all this weren’t discouraging enough, Bradford pears just don’t live a long time, as trees go. Starting around the age of 20, the trees simply begin to decline, with few of them living past the age of 30.
I don't think a Bradford pear would last long in ND. First Blizzard with 50MPH winds and temps of 20-30 F below zero would pretty much do them in the first year.
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