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Old 05-03-2014, 03:39 PM
 
7,022 posts, read 10,329,928 times
Reputation: 13797

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Quote:
Originally Posted by no kudzu View Post
I know no one past or present on this forum who has tried to pass themselves as experts in gardening.
I think that's wonderful. But as you have said, you are friends with some of the experts here, even visiting one. I choose not to admire people if they can't post without using dirty words, being a bragger, and being disrespectful to others. I did mention the date of that post on here, and there are many more. But, you have your opinion, and I have mine.

At any rate.....Carry On! I'm going to enjoy my garden club meeting with some down-in-the-dirt garden experts.
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Old 05-03-2014, 05:56 PM
 
Location: Former LI'er Now a Rehoboth Beach Bunny
7,249 posts, read 9,611,848 times
Reputation: 6923
No one person is an expert in all facets of any field. One might be a master gardener and reside in the desert of California and another a master gardener in Minnesota. Each may have core facts about gardening that apply to each but certainly each has it own particular set of problems and needs. Similarly, when I have a problem in my garden I usually go to a local garden center or Cooperative extension to get answers. I don't even go to the next state, which here in Rehoboth is not all that far away.

You are participants in a forum that you have to pick and choose the pearls that some offer and discard what doesn't apply.
There are experts in Interior Decorating, whose results in my mind are beyond awful, but they are recognized as experts because they have taken and passed courses in interior design and are members of a number of different professional Interior Design organizations. That said, it doesn't mean I will like their designs for my home.

RDLR.....started the hunt for the supertunias at the local nursery on Coastal Highway, will no doubt go to East Coast Nursery or at least call to see if if they will get them in. Can't wait getting itchy gloves to plant my pots.!!!!
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Old 05-03-2014, 07:00 PM
 
Location: CO
2,456 posts, read 2,441,770 times
Reputation: 5160
I almost wrecked my car when I saw a Mimosa tree in bloom in my semi-arid zone 5 neighborhood. It's the only one I've seen around here. It's so unusual that our local garden guys on talk radio always mention it. We think it's wonderful. But as I learned being a lifelong birder, "one person's trash bird is another's lifer." All depends on where you are and what is common to your area.
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Old 05-03-2014, 10:11 PM
 
Location: Seattle Area
1,716 posts, read 1,493,390 times
Reputation: 4114
Quote:
Originally Posted by nuts2uiam View Post
No one person is an expert in all facets of any field.
I am. There I said it.
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Old 05-04-2014, 08:05 AM
 
Location: Western Washington
8,004 posts, read 9,671,359 times
Reputation: 19409
Quote:
Originally Posted by no kudzu View Post
I've been on CD for several years and at least 4 times I've seen very generous and knowledgeable people run off by snarky comments. Glad to say I haven't seen it so far this growing season.

There was a man who managed a big box nursery department and he was so helpful. I like to look up his old posts. And he was mostly self taught. he was run off.

There was a man who knew so much about trees especially and he did a lot of volunteer work with ridding nuisance trees from land. He got into it about mimosa and sweet gum trees and got really mad at those who insisted they were pretty, and they would plant them no matter what harm they did. he gave up in disgust and took his considerable knowledge elsewhere.

There was a woman who took incredible time and energy to look up questions and post lots of links to back her posts. I marveled at her experience and willingness to share. Somebody on here called her a know it all and other snarky things. She has not been back in many months and i doubt she will ever be back,

So be sure to thank those who take the time and energy to share what they have learned either through formal education or experience. Many times we are getting information we should be paying big bucks for.

Outstanding post, NK. I agree! When it comes to gardening, let's face it, I've been doing it my entire life and did it professionally as well and there are STILL things to be learned! LOL For courageous, curous, willing gardeners, there is always going to be a plant that they've not suceeded with before, something they've never tried before, something they've struggled with before. Forums like this bring people from around the world, who have so much gardening experience to share. It's exciting!

Meanness though...that has no place in the gardener's world. Sh*t! We've got enough "bad" to deal with...with insects, weather, soil issues, water issues, diseases, family who thinks you're out of your mind, because you already HAVE enough garden space...you don't NEED another garden space. LOL

Gardening is supposed to bring us peace....not discord. It should be bringing us closer together, not pushing us apart. We have something in common.....our love for nature and her beauty.

As for bamboo? LOL I built my garden fence from my bamboo this year, as well as building several of my trellises out of it. In fact, doggone it, I thought I'd have enough to do ALL of my trellises with my "thinnings" this spring, but I won't. You see, in our part of the country, it doesn't go nuts. Oh, it runs a bit here and there, but only far enough to let me get a couple of new plants to pot up for "spot privacy" on occasion. When my bamboo privacy "wall" starts getting a little thick, it's time to borrow some for projects! Lemonade from lemons.
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Old 05-04-2014, 08:06 AM
 
Location: Dallas
5,463 posts, read 4,584,670 times
Reputation: 15593
There are gardeners who have been educated in the science behind gardening, and there are those who just naturally have a "green thumb". I think the problem lies when either type begin to insist their way is the only way. Make your point and then allow others to make theirs. Let the reader decide which one they will follow.

I appreciate expert advice, but I don't discount some of the old timers tips on growing things. My grandfather was an Italian immigrant who was a landscaper by trade. He probably didn't go past 6th grade, but his yard was like the garden of Eden. It was a magical place - rose arbors, grape arbors, fruit trees and flowers everywhere. His vegetable garden was filled to bursting each season. My visits to his home sparked my lifelong interest and love of gardening.

I admit I have a special fondness of old wives tales when it comes to gardening. I'll give them a try over the use of chemicals any day. But I do respect new scientific knowledge when presented, and will certainly give them my consideration. Just please don't try to shove your "facts" down my throat after you have made your point.
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Old 05-04-2014, 08:24 AM
 
Location: Western Washington
8,004 posts, read 9,671,359 times
Reputation: 19409
Quote:
Originally Posted by aquietpath View Post
There are gardeners who have been educated in the science behind gardening, and there are those who just naturally have a "green thumb". I think the problem lies when either type begin to insist their way is the only way. Make your point and then allow others to make theirs. Let the reader decide which one they will follow.

I appreciate expert advice, but I don't discount some of the old timers tips on growing things. My grandfather was an Italian immigrant who was a landscaper by trade. He probably didn't go past 6th grade, but his yard was like the garden of Eden. It was a magical place - rose arbors, grape arbors, fruit trees and flowers everywhere. His vegetable garden was filled to bursting each season. My visits to his home sparked my lifelong interest and love of gardening.

I admit I have a special fondness of old wives tales when it comes to gardening. I'll give them a try over the use of chemicals any day. But I do respect new scientific knowledge when presented, and will certainly give them my consideration. Just please don't try to shove your "facts" down my throat after you have made your point.

I love your second paragraph! Some people......and everyone probably knows someone like them....were clearly put on this earth to tend plants. The thing of it is, MANY people used to grow their own food and took great pride in their plants. Many of those plants were heirloom plants, starts from a family member's or friend's garden. Those plants truly MEANT something personal, to those folks. Rarely, did people ever take classes. Their teachers were their families, friends, neighbors, trial and error and gardening BOOKS.
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Old 05-04-2014, 09:16 AM
 
4,760 posts, read 8,388,889 times
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Aquietpath, I too, like beachmel ; appreciate your second paragraph. I think most of us, at some point in our lives, run into someone like your grandfather and it "clicks" in our heads about gardening.

I think for me, it was my grand parents as well. They had a simple backyard but they made wine out of the grapes & plums they harvested the old fashion way, in big barrels. My first taste of wine was in their kitchen. They told me it's only for adults so I snucked in when no one was there because I *had to* try it My mother was a big influence as well. When she gets up in the morning, she will wipe down every house plants, leaves by leaves, with a wet towel. I often joked with her that she treats her plants better than her son.

Our passions for gardening come from a life time of influences by our parents, families, and even strangers we've met like your grand father that made an impression on us. When I was younger living in big cities, I was too busy with life but after we moved to where we are, opportunity presented itself and I was drawn to it like a bug drawn to my fresh succulent lettuce in the garden. My garden is too small to serious reduce our food bills, but it is a passion, a hobby, and it satisfies my curiosity to experiment.

Good conversation.
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Old 05-04-2014, 09:51 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
31,214 posts, read 57,343,818 times
Reputation: 52067
Quote:
Originally Posted by aquietpath View Post
I appreciate expert advice, but I don't discount some of the old timers tips on growing things. My grandfather was an Italian immigrant who was a landscaper by trade. He probably didn't go past 6th grade, but his yard was like the garden of Eden. It was a magical place - rose arbors, grape arbors, fruit trees and flowers everywhere. His vegetable garden was filled to bursting each season. My visits to his home sparked my lifelong interest and love of gardening.
How lovely. My grandfather was an Italian immigrant as well; his vegetable garden encompassed his entire backyard and fed a family of 16, and he had Italian plum and cherry trees as well.

Some of my fondest childhood memories are of tottering around behind him as he tended his tomatoes, peppers, pole beans, and squash, and holding the big aluminum colander as he gathered the food for that night's dinner.

Many of the gardening tips and tricks I use in my own garden I learned from knowledge passed from him to my mom and my uncle, who took over the garden as my grandfather became older.
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Old 05-04-2014, 10:19 AM
 
5,541 posts, read 4,391,933 times
Reputation: 10862
Quote:
Originally Posted by aquietpath View Post
There are gardeners who have been educated in the science behind gardening, and there are those who just naturally have a "green thumb". I think the problem lies when either type begin to insist their way is the only way. Make your point and then allow others to make theirs. Let the reader decide which one they will follow.

I appreciate expert advice, but I don't discount some of the old timers tips on growing things. My grandfather was an Italian immigrant who was a landscaper by trade. He probably didn't go past 6th grade, but his yard was like the garden of Eden. It was a magical place - rose arbors, grape arbors, fruit trees and flowers everywhere. His vegetable garden was filled to bursting each season. My visits to his home sparked my lifelong interest and love of gardening.

I admit I have a special fondness of old wives tales when it comes to gardening. I'll give them a try over the use of chemicals any day. But I do respect new scientific knowledge when presented, and will certainly give them my consideration. Just please don't try to shove your "facts" down my throat after you have made your point.
My grandfather was like that also! I don't know if he ever stepped foot in a school room.

His yard was beautiful. Even here in dry south texas he could grow apple trees. This was way back in the 1960s and 70s before any of these hybrids were developed. He like to graft also. And topiary.

And all kinds of fruits and veggies. He did support himself as a labor foreman. He would take people all over the country to pick/process different crops. He loved going to Washington state. Maybe that is where he got his apple growing techniques.

My favorite was when he grew the popping type of corn.
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