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Old 05-04-2014, 11:47 AM
 
7,015 posts, read 10,319,686 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aquietpath View Post
I appreciate expert advice, but I don't discount some of the old timers tips on growing things. My grandfather was an Italian immigrant who was a landscaper by trade. He probably didn't go past 6th grade, but his yard was like the garden of Eden. It was a magical place - rose arbors, grape arbors, fruit trees and flowers everywhere. His vegetable garden was filled to bursting each season. My visits to his home sparked my lifelong interest and love of gardening.

I admit I have a special fondness of old wives tales when it comes to gardening. I'll give them a try over the use of chemicals any day. But I do respect new scientific knowledge when presented, and will certainly give them my consideration. Just please don't try to shove your "facts" down my throat after you have made your point.
Yes, Bravo! That is an excellent post, aquietpath!

I was raised with the Amish and learned about organic gardening, and hand-me-down tricks of the trade. I also remember the beautiful arbors, climbing roses on the sides of sheds, and flowers galore. Everything grew and bloomed with such ease. I don't think what was handed down to us should be discounted, and replaced with scientific jargon. Granted, science has changed some of our gardening techniques, but it has certainly not replaced them. By the way, I went on to gain some fancy-dancy education in agricultural science, but my dirt-under-the-fingernails techniques prevailed.
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Old 05-04-2014, 03:19 PM
 
23,902 posts, read 31,123,865 times
Reputation: 28539
Quote:
Originally Posted by SATX56 View Post
I take it you see them as a pest as many see Mountain Laurel and Esperanza's?





or Birds of Paradise....




They all do well in our semi desert conditions here.
Um, no? None of those plants are a problem as far as I am concerned (except mountain laurel is poisonous to livestock so it is never grown around here). They are nothing like mimosas - which sprout up like chickweed. Mimosas are a huge pest...and should never ever be planted.
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Old 05-04-2014, 04:38 PM
 
Location: South Central Texas
114,036 posts, read 52,353,828 times
Reputation: 161789
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChessieMom View Post
Um, no? None of those plants are a problem as far as I am concerned (except mountain laurel is poisonous to livestock so it is never grown around here). They are nothing like mimosas - which sprout up like chickweed. Mimosas are a huge pest...and should never ever be planted.
Um, well I'm not familiar with their growing habits. I have rooted some from seed though and will find out.
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Old 05-04-2014, 05:04 PM
 
Location: CO
2,456 posts, read 2,437,081 times
Reputation: 5155
Love all the remiscences about Italian grandfathers. I keep picturing the garden scene In Godfather II when Don Corleone meets his end. In the novel his last words were "life is so beautiful." No wonder - he died in a garden!

To further the OP's conversation, I agree that we can listen to both sides of an argument: do it this way - no, do it that way. Ultimately, it behooves us all to do a bit of research to determine what advice we'll listen to. And then do what we think best. I enjoy the give and take on this forum but it's human nature to be opinionated. Arguing a point to death wins no one over.
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Old 05-04-2014, 05:21 PM
 
5,536 posts, read 4,378,162 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lost Roses View Post
Love all the remiscences about Italian grandfathers. I keep picturing the garden scene In Godfather II when Don Corleone meets his end. In the novel his last words were "life is so beautiful." No wonder - he died in a garden!

To further the OP's conversation, I agree that we can listen to both sides of an argument: do it this way - no, do it that way. Ultimately, it behooves us all to do a bit of research to determine what advice we'll listen to. And then do what we think best. I enjoy the give and take on this forum but it's human nature to be opinionated. Arguing a point to death wins no one over.
yeah, but the tomato plants in that scene were all wilted looking. That is all I remember about it. I want to yell, water the tomatoes!
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Old 05-04-2014, 05:23 PM
 
5,536 posts, read 4,378,162 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SATX56 View Post
Um, well I'm not familiar with their growing habits. I have rooted some from seed though and will find out.
We had a mimosa tree planted too close to the house, so we took it out.

I have never seen any seedlings. Its been 15 years or more - nothing. Maybe it depends on the zone? Here in 7/8.
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Old 05-04-2014, 06:44 PM
 
Location: Western Washington
8,004 posts, read 9,651,862 times
Reputation: 19408
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clemencia53 View Post
yeah, but the tomato plants in that scene were all wilted looking. That is all I remember about it. I want to yell, water the tomatoes!

LOL....I am so glad I'm not the ONLY gardener who does that! Hahahaaa

You know, personally, I'm one of those gardeners who will try BOTH ways. The thing of it is, when you meet several people who are doing things differently, and they're ALL having successes, it means that there are several ways that "it works". Once you try all methods, you know what works for you, in your location.

I enjoy having options and truly appreciate the input. Frankly, the only people who irritate the heck out of me, whether it's gardening or other skills/hobbies, are the ones who insist that their way is the only way to do it and anyone who does it differently than they do....are fools.

Yep...everybody else? ... I'd love to have over for a bbq!
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Old 05-04-2014, 07:18 PM
 
23,902 posts, read 31,123,865 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Clemencia53 View Post
We had a mimosa tree planted too close to the house, so we took it out.

I have never seen any seedlings. Its been 15 years or more - nothing. Maybe it depends on the zone? Here in 7/8.
I'm in 7/8 as well. Every mimosa here is followed by little seedlings...it is very very invasive and is absolutely considered a pest and weed tree.

https://dnr.state.il.us/Stewardship/CD/eppc/mimosa.html
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Old 05-04-2014, 07:19 PM
 
23,902 posts, read 31,123,865 times
Reputation: 28539
Quote:
Originally Posted by SATX56 View Post
Um, well I'm not familiar with their growing habits. I have rooted some from seed though and will find out.
You'll find out pretty quickly.

Texas Invasives
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Old 05-04-2014, 08:03 PM
 
5,536 posts, read 4,378,162 times
Reputation: 10827
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChessieMom View Post
I'm in 7/8 as well. Every mimosa here is followed by little seedlings...it is very very invasive and is absolutely considered a pest and weed tree.

https://dnr.state.il.us/Stewardship/CD/eppc/mimosa.html
I guess we were lucky. But I think it's pretty, it was just too close. The people that lived some time ago owned part of a nursery. They planted all kinds of trees and some right next to the house! We took out all kinds of trees.
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