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Old 05-15-2014, 09:47 AM
 
Location: Logan Township, Minnesota
15,419 posts, read 10,253,112 times
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My experiment with the Squash Plants killed them, Temp reached 26F at about 1AM last night and it stayed below freezing until about 8AM

I do not know what the actual low was but I believe it is safe to assume it was below 26F
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Old 05-15-2014, 10:22 AM
 
3,442 posts, read 3,709,866 times
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At the dairy farm in Minnesota, my son longs for springs of the past that were much warmer allowing crops to be seeded earlier and mature and dry down properly in the growing season.

Seems the last few years the springs have been colder and colder .

30 and 40 years ago were a lot warmer and earlier springs.

We were told the effects of global warming would be increased heat forcing crops to move farther north to escape it.

The last several years have seen the opposite.

We long for the warm, early springs of 30-40 years ago.

(yes, I am taking a pot shot at all the global warming advocates )
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Old 05-15-2014, 03:27 PM
 
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Frost warning again for tonight at the farm .
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Old 05-22-2014, 04:16 AM
 
Location: SWCT - close to coast
52,962 posts, read 35,367,654 times
Reputation: 7979
Quote:
Originally Posted by Teddy52 View Post
At the dairy farm in Minnesota, my son longs for springs of the past that were much warmer allowing crops to be seeded earlier and mature and dry down properly in the growing season.

Seems the last few years the springs have been colder and colder .

30 and 40 years ago were a lot warmer and earlier springs.

We were told the effects of global warming would be increased heat forcing crops to move farther north to escape it.

The last several years have seen the opposite.

We long for the warm, early springs of 30-40 years ago.

(yes, I am taking a pot shot at all the global warming advocates )
On your side 1000% but since it's Not the right place for it all I'll say is... the globe is a big area and they are only focusing on the warm parts. Also... April 2014 was tied for 2nd warmest for Earth... do you know why??????? Click my thread and you'll see... these are the things the general public is not aware of.

Back to topic.....

Ohio State tested these blankets for strawberries over winter:

"Visually, we've seen good results although we haven't started harvesting yet. But visually we can see how they overwintered, and the crops look pretty good."

--------------------

This Maine farm says late crops this year

"My greenhouse was a month behind in warming up, so I figure the ground will be a month behind, also," Marin said. "It's either been cold or it's been windy,"
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Old 05-22-2014, 07:13 AM
 
Location: SWCT - close to coast
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Released yesterday regarding the Grape crop damaged in Ohio. Not good when there is "trunk" damage.

The Climate Observer - May 2014

"Earlier this year many of us experienced the “polar vortex” wrath, one of the coldest Arctic outbreaks in two decades that plunged into the United States bringing bitterly cold temperatures to the Midwest, South, and East including Ohio. For us humans, the wind chill was even worse and life threatening, leading to closures of public institutions and businesses across the country in early January. So, how did this arctic blast impact grapes? Many vineyards in Ohio were affected, and vines sustained extensive bud and trunk damage depending on the location and the variety grown. Dr. Dami, State Viticulturist, and his team at the Ohio State University (OSU) conducted a survey to estimate the extent of crop loss. Growers reported 800 acres of grapes that experienced an average minimum temperature of -14F (see map, Fig. 1) and caused nearly $4 million of economic loss. Total losses to Ohio grape producers are expected to be much larger, considering that there are some 1,900 acres growing this crop in the state"


"OSU research vineyard in Wooster, -11F was recorded during the polar vortex event. The same temperature caused 50% bud damage to vinifera varieties in 2009, but this year it lasted much longer, and the day before, the temperature was 45F, leading to nearly 100 percent bud damage. The mild temperatures also melted the snow, which eliminated the extra insulating protection it provides to the trunks. Finally and adding insult to injury, growers who have wind machines, that help protect grapevines from extreme cold, could not use them this year because of the windy conditions that prevailed during the polar vortex."

"Despite that the minimum temperatures experienced in 2014 were not the coldest recorded in Ohio, crop damage was extensive and Dami attributes this disastrous outcome to a combination of factors. First, the coldest temperatures experienced in the state were frequent as a result of the polar vortex that descended into the United States. Second, extremely low temperatures that can kill buds and trunks usually only last a few minutes, while this year such temperatures lingered for hours. The most important factor however, was that vine cold hardiness became compromised this winter due to warm weather in December tricking vines that spring is around the corner"

"While these losses are substantial, the potential damage to grapevine trunks and vine death is more worrisome, as it would impact growers over a longer period of time. With bud damage, crop loss can be partial or total but for one season only. With trunk damage, it takes one year to retrain new trunks and another year to resume full production. However, if the whole vine dies, growers have to start from scratch, and it will take four years from replanting to have a full crop again. "
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Old 05-24-2014, 02:25 PM
 
Location: SWCT - close to coast
52,962 posts, read 35,367,654 times
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Hailstorm damages crop in NJ. Potatoes & Zucchinni damaged & even baby peaches were ripped off (Thanks to snj90 for link)

South Jersey farmers assess damage after hailstorm hits tri-county crops | NJ.com

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Old 05-25-2014, 12:37 PM
Status: "Pen Pineapple Apple Pen!" (set 29 days ago)
 
Location: Land of Free Johnson-Weld-2016
6,361 posts, read 11,871,563 times
Reputation: 6183
Actually my fear is that this awful and seemingly unseasonable cold IS thanks to global warming. You know...if you have ice melting nearby, it makes the air really cold. Maybe that's what is happening. Some ice melting...
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Old 07-13-2014, 04:54 AM
 
Location: SWCT - close to coast
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This farm is blaming the past winter for low yields but in the article they say near average. So that's not too bad if you had a harsh winter and still able to produce "near average" yields.

Obviously the more the better especially with population growth but at least it's not low or none.

I don't think we're hearing enough of the effects this past winter had on crops. Even down to the home gardeners. I don't even have a blush tomato yet its mid July!

Farmers blame harsh winter for low wheat yields - Wandtv.com, NewsCenter17, StormCenter17, Central Illinois News-
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Old 07-13-2014, 07:28 AM
 
Location: Mass
966 posts, read 996,518 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cambium View Post
I don't think we're hearing enough of the effects this past winter had on crops. Even down to the home gardeners. I don't even have a blush tomato yet its mid July!
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Wow. In our community garden, the plots haven't looked this good in years!

I picked my first little cherry toms before July 4th.

Other gardeners have some paste tomatoes ripening this week. Sun gold tomatoes abound. Some big ones are ripening - variet UNK.

CUKES and squashes are plentiful. Ugh. Even the lima beans look good. I hate Lima beans.

Fungi and diseases haven't reared their ugly heads. Flea beetles are a total nuisance along with some slugs, etc. to be expected.

Last two years, though? Sad, sad, sad all around. Many of us just ripped our plsnts out by Aug.

I wonder about the big disparity since you should be warmer in CT than Mass.?
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Old 07-13-2014, 09:56 AM
 
Location: SWCT - close to coast
52,962 posts, read 35,367,654 times
Reputation: 7979
Quote:
Originally Posted by flowbe202 View Post
Wow. In our community garden, the plots haven't looked this good in years!

I picked my first little cherry toms before July 4th.

Other gardeners have some paste tomatoes ripening this week. Sun gold tomatoes abound. Some big ones are ripening - variet UNK.

CUKES and squashes are plentiful. Ugh. Even the lima beans look good. I hate Lima beans.

Fungi and diseases haven't reared their ugly heads. Flea beetles are a total nuisance along with some slugs, etc. to be expected.

Last two years, though? Sad, sad, sad all around. Many of us just ripped our plsnts out by Aug.

I wonder about the big disparity since you should be warmer in CT than Mass.?
Consider yourself lucky...

Cukes yes. Cherrys are small so they ripen quicken and easier. Beans grow even with cool weather.

Everyone in the area including MA and Boston is a couple weeks late this year with stuff including tomatoes.

Dave Epstein(an Horticulturalist and professor whos name is "gardenwisdom") just got his "first" cherry tomato 2 days ago. Cherry...not regular. We're all feeling it. Some might not notice the 2 week lag though.

https://twitter.com/growingwisdom/st...889536/photo/1

I just harvested bunch of onions, radish and potatoes but the Tomatoes and Peppers are having a bad year. No blight or diseases at all though.

The start stunted them.

Maybe we can contribute the cold early spring waters that affected me.
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