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Old 06-07-2014, 06:10 PM
 
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I Was Wondering If Anyone Would Know:
After Removing 11 Large Over-Grown Arborvitae That We Had Planted, Can We Just Go in And Plant Some Completely Different Kind Of Shrubs, Or, Do We Have To Do Anything To The Soil? Neutralize It, For Instance? Thanks For Your Time...
Any & All Advice Would Be So Welcome!
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Old 06-07-2014, 07:27 PM
 
Location: Former LI'er Now a Rehoboth Beach Bunny
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Quote:
Originally Posted by suzeeque22 View Post
I Was Wondering If Anyone Would Know:
After Removing 11 Large Over-Grown Arborvitae That We Had Planted, Can We Just Go in And Plant Some Completely Different Kind Of Shrubs, Or, Do We Have To Do Anything To The Soil? Neutralize It, For Instance? Thanks For Your Time...
Any & All Advice Would Be So Welcome!
I removed several different shrubs including abborvite and simply amended the soil with compost. Topsoil and then watered in the new shrubs very, very well. I did not add fertilizer when planting but did add root blaster to the hole before putting the new shrubs in.
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Old 06-07-2014, 07:52 PM
 
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No, you don't need to do anything, except get a soil test done at your county extension office, just so you know the pH, at least. If it is abnormally low or high, you should take steps to adust it, and the instructions for doing that will come with your soil test results.
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Old 06-07-2014, 08:02 PM
 
Location: Mass
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Like Tina mentioned above, a Ph test will help you adjust the soil depending on the shrubs you're putting in... Rhodies, hydrangeas and azaleas will love current conditions, but shrubs like syringas will want a more alkaline soil than you probably have.
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Old 06-08-2014, 03:49 PM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
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I third that. Obviously till and break up or remove any roots in that row/area. Trees may have sucked up any nutrients in there so get a soil test done. Then see what kind of soil your new shrubs/trees/plants like and fix soil accordingly if it needs fixing.
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